Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by gdl203, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Concrete is underused in kitchens without a doubt. If only he was looking for a new kitchen work space and not a dining room table.

    Thomas, two things come to mind. I'm having dinner at a friend's this weekend who had a beautiful table made out of a raw piece of walnut and bronze legs. Not exactly inexpensive, but I think you can do the look for less. I'd love to rip this idea off, but we're too close. Maybe keep your eye out for a great piece of used marble and go from there. I'll take a few pics when I'm there.

    If you would consider rustic I am probably selling a 100-year-old round pedestal table from the Philippines. Seats eight. Maybe too rustic but it really does stand out and round tables are great for dinner conversation.

    lefty
     
  2. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    There is a place near me that does the 'live edge' wood tables called Willard Bros. if it ends up coming to a table in that spectrum I would give them a call. They have quite a bit of experience in that style of table, and have a huge inventory of slabs.
     
  3. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    The slab table has been a little overused lately, but done well it is very beautiful. The key is dark hand-rubbed finish that draws the eye in and a very high-end leg.

    Kind of like an expensive hooker.

    lefty
     
  4. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    LOL!

    The master woodworker of that shop is Ru Amagasu, who is a very talented craftsman in his own right, and also happens to be George Nakashima's grandson. Hard to find a better apprenticeship in the realm of live edge wood tables.

    Not sure if it's where the discussion was going, but it's a choice that would fit the look of the house well, in my opinion.
     
  5. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    It might fit my needs as well. I've decided that to maximize my space I'm going to do away with the bar seating area of the island and built a table for 8 coming out from under the counter where the stools would normally sit. This will allow me to keep the food/eating area visually separated from the living/seating area and allow for a few seating options in the living space. I have a harvest table that I will slip into the space and live with for a while.

    Either that or buy the apt next door and put in a proper dining room.

    lefty
     
  6. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    And very "on trend".

    You can most likely "DIY" it, get a walnut, wenge etc. slab and have someone make the frame in steel and get it copper coated, I don't think bronze is that expensive if you can get it wholesale.


    Speaking of "raw" wood www.hudsonfurnitureinc.com
     
  7. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    @Lefty, I'm apartment hunting at the moment and I decided a while back, that I wanted a round dining table and I have actually been looking at a Tulipan, Platner or the new Tom Dixon with the marble top as options, with some nice contemporary chairs and a Persian rug.
     
  8. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    I agree that a "live edge" table (I had no idea that was the term) would harmonize nicely in my space but my folks are Nakashima collectors of sorts, owning two dining tables, a desk, and a coffee table (the coffee table is "original" George Nakashima, the rest are from his continuing studio operation). My wife and I have widely varying tastes, and it's hard enough hammering out a compromise as it is. The last thing I need is to hear "you just want that because you want the house to look like your parents' house!" I once retorted "it's not my fault I was raised with parents with good taste" but that didn't end well for me.

    Anyways, our house is already so staid I have sort of been enjoying the idea of breaking the mold a little with something a bit more daring anyways.
     
  9. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Lol, I'm engaged and live with my fiancé, so i completely understand.
     
  10. twistoffat

    twistoffat Senior member

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    Be careful, never accuse your wife of having poor taste, afterall she chose you ;)
     
  11. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    pretty much QED
     
  12. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    A round table is a good thing. I will miss this one. My problem is that a lot of my bigger furniture won't fit into my new NYC life. There are a few things I'm loathe to sell like my Jens Risom desk. But at 6' x 3' it's hard to justify the space for it, so it's in storage in NJ until someone makes me a reasonable offer for it (looking at you, SG) or I haul it out to Rago and auction it off.

    Pics of your parent's furniture/house would be cool. I bet they loved your place when they saw it.

    By the way, your house is anything but "staid." It's the most compelling place I've seen on here.

    lefty
     
  13. nootje

    nootje Senior member

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    I'm so glad my gf and I have pretty similar tastes.
    I grew up in a house full of antiques, which is something I will probably never want to live in again. She grew up in a house full of nicknacks, thus preferring a more cleaned up look.

    Combined you get a more modern cleaned up look. Its one discussion we never have.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2013
  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    There is a very large overlap between modern and antiques, since many modern pieces 'of the era' are in fact antiques. That is if you are using modern to represent a body of work and not as a replacement for contemporary.

    Furniture or interior aesthetics seem to flip flop with each generation, the stuff I like is more consistent with what my grandparents liked than what my parents Like. I suspect when I have kids they will hate modern after 20 years or so.
     
  15. nootje

    nootje Senior member

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    I know, but when i said antique I meant the luxury 1890 look. This included paintings from the hague school like Verveer, Mesdag etc. The house basically was a live in museum.

    My own apartment has more elements from eames, rohe and an overdose of walnut bookcases. I call it relatively modern, but I'm sure it can be called something else more precisely.
     

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