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Cool for Brits to speak American - How about the reverse?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Lear, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. dusty

    dusty Senior member

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    ohio
    we say uber a lot ..

    [​IMG]
     
  2. JustinW

    JustinW Senior member

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    The only person in America who actually tries to look or sound British is Jetblast. I think that answers your question.

    I have spent many years cultivating my online Australian persona [​IMG]
     
  3. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    I have spent many years cultivating my online Australian persona [​IMG]

    In case you were wondering, M@t definitely sounds Australian. Very very Australian.
     
  4. cimabue

    cimabue Senior member

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    Thought.
    "At the end of the day."

    "shuttered" for shut.

    "cheers"

    "bloody"

    "shite"

    ending a declarative sentence with "yeah?"

    "wank/wanker"

    "bollocks"

    "snarky"

    "smarmy"

    These are strong gainers Stateside.

    I'm sure there are more, "for fuck's sake".
     
  5. Mark it 8

    Mark it 8 Senior member

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    Years ago I had a prick roommate in LA who insisted on calling me his "flatmate" and referring to our shitbox apartment as his "flat." Soon after he began dating a Jewish girl, he started to greet everyone with "Shalom." [​IMG]
     
  6. clotheshorse69

    clotheshorse69 Senior member

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    Feb 2, 2010
  7. tagutcow

    tagutcow Senior member

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    I actually use "summat" and "Bob's your uncle" in written and spoken language respectively. I also use little syntactical quirks like "the gift that was given me". I don't use them because they're British, I use them because I like them.
     
  8. Big Pun

    Big Pun Senior member

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    امریکا
  9. tagutcow

    tagutcow Senior member

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  10. closetmess

    closetmess Senior member

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    Not sure about the US, but my part of Canada "Cheers" is the go to salutation for "hip/cool" kids.

    Speak for yourself. I shudder every time someone says that. I even found it in my lexicon a few years back and had to undergo Clockwork Orange style "learning" to rid myself of it.
     
  11. KitAkira

    KitAkira Senior member

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    I've always wanted to walk around asking "'ave you seen our 'ouse?"
     
  12. willpower

    willpower Senior member

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    This is how we roll on the West Coast

    IMPORTANT NOTICE: No media files are hosted on these forums. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website. We can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. If the video does not play, wait a minute or try again later. I AGREE

    TIP: to embed Youtube clips, put only the encoded part of the Youtube URL, e.g. eBGIQ7ZuuiU between the tags.
     
  13. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    In case you were wondering, M@t definitely sounds Australian. Very very Australian.
    ya think?

    Mostly people find my accent non-descript...guessing Australian and occasionally southern British at a stretch. It is very rounded out, since I have lived like two thirds of my adult life out of the country.

    Anyhow, ok, cool...I still sound Australian. This is a good thing. Kinda.
     
  14. Vintage Gent

    Vintage Gent Senior member

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    Speak for yourself. I shudder every time someone says that. I even found it in my lexicon a few years back and had to undergo Clockwork Orange style "learning" to rid myself of it.

    You like it the Ludivico Method?
     
  15. frenchy

    frenchy Senior member

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    "Cunt" as a casual swear word, which has been popular in the UK for many years, has recently become more popular in the US. For the longest time it was extraordinarily taboo here. It was tantamount to the n-word and other racial slurs in terms of the most vicious words available in the American lexicon.

    These days, unless the word is directed at a woman, it's become pretty widespread. I don't know whether to credit the UK with that influence, but I do imagine it has something to do with all the Guy Ritchie films and whatnot that brought UK swear words over here.


    i love "cunt"
     
  16. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    Location:
    Grand Forks, ND, USA
    "At the end of the day."

    "shuttered" for shut.

    "cheers"

    "bloody"

    "shite"

    ending a declarative sentence with "yeah?"

    "wank/wanker"

    "bollocks"

    "snarky"

    "smarmy"

    These are strong gainers Stateside.

    I'm sure there are more, "for fuck's sake".


    Not where I live.
     
  17. AntiHero84

    AntiHero84 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,425
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    Long Island
    I actually use "summat" and "Bob's your uncle" in written and spoken language respectively. I also use little syntactical quirks like "the gift that was given me". I don't use them because they're British, I use them because I like them.

    Sounds like someone is trying to hide their uniball.
     
  18. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    Nov 30, 2004
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    NYC
    No, but it seems like girls love British accents in general.

    The only person in America who actually tries to look or sound British is Jetblast. I think that answers your question.

    Didn't Madonna (and Gwenyth?[​IMG]) start speaking w/ British accents?

    * I may adopt words/phrase (but not spellings!), but refuse to do the accent
     
  19. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    People who are into soccer sometimes call it a "pitch" around here and refer to the footwear as "boots."
     
  20. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    NYC
    I use the word dodgy to describe dodgy places. I took it from the Brits I work with and like it far more than "sketchy".

    And I say zebra with a short E simply because I have heard Bear Grylls say zebra countless times more than any American. And it's the least I can do after watching him eat a random zebra (short E) carcus he found on some adventure. He didn't wince at the dodgy situation.
     

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