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Conspicious consumption

LabelKing

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What are all of your opinions of conspicious consumption? What I mean are logo laden clothing and flamboyant displays of things like gold pens, Hermes scarves Louis Vuitton luggage, and such. Just a thought.
 

Greg Weinstein

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i like products that are a little more flashy and eye-catching. For example the Gucci Big G Belt, which in my opinion isnt conspicious but more noticable than other belts. How are people suspose to know what name brand you are wearing unless it cleary has the logo n e ways?
??
 

pstoller

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I like products that are a little more flashy and eye-catching...How are people supposed to know what name brand you are wearing unless it clearly has the logo n e ways?
I like things that are eye-catching, as well. (Sometimes painfully so.) However, there's more than one way for a personal item to catch someone's eye. To me, the main point of buying something by a given designer is the quality of the design, not the name-brand recognition. The cut and fit of an item, its construction, the hand, pattern and color of the material...those are the things to which I respond. It just so happens that many "name" designers make such things. If, after that, a logo also figures into the design, that's cool. If the logo is essentially the whole design, that's not.

People aren't supposed to know what brand I'm wearing, necessarily. If they do, fine, but I don't need my clothes to scream, "Prada. Gucci. Fendi." That's like keeping the price tag on so people can see how much I spent. Besides, if I'm going to be a walking billboard, the company should pay me for the ad space, not the other way around.

Ask yourself this: would you rather people who check you out conclude, "he looks great," or, "he wears Versace"? The former requires style; the latter just takes money.
 

Greg Weinstein

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To me, the main point of buying something by a given designer is the quality of the design, not the name-brand recognition.
for me its the exact opposite.......i look for the name brand recognition. In my opinion if it is a name brand and is expensive it has good quality. I also do have some cheaper no name clothes, but i prefer to stick to the brand names.

Ask yourself this: would you rather people who check you out conclude, "he looks great," or, "he wears Versace"?
i rather someone say "he wears Versace" because it conveys an image of money and style.
 

ulf

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I don't think there's anything wrong with logos if you can carry them off with style. Not flaunt them, basically. Wearing logos in order to make sure others know what brands you're wearing is simply tacky, I'm sorry.

Coco Chanel said something like "Luxury should be treated like trash and trash like luxury." A great philosophy IMO.
 

Renwick

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i rather someone say "he wears Versace" because it conveys an image of money and style.
Then there really is no point in buying Versace at all if ALL you want is the label. Just buy knock-offs and people will think it's Versace anyway. I'd rather have a good piece of clothing from an unknown label than a poorly made suit that has a nice label. Although I really do like the Versace medusa logo belts and my Gucci G watch just because I like the design. I also but prada shoes because I know that they last and can take a beating.
 

pstoller

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I look for the name brand recognition. In my opinion if it is a name brand and is expensive it has good quality. I also do have some cheaper no name clothes, but I prefer to stick to the brand names.
You can spend gobs of money on a big-name designer item and get poor quality. People here have noted, for example, that much of what is produced by Prada and Prada Group labels, or by Armani in the bridge lines, is not very well made. This is not to say that you might as well wear "no-name" clothes"”although some are as good as designer items selling for exponentially more"”but rather that you can get far better quality for the same money from designers who are not as well known. There are also some great things from Prada and Armani, but you have to shop for the item, rather than just the label, to find them.
would you rather people who check you out conclude, "he looks great," or, "he wears Versace"?
I'd rather someone say "he wears Versace" because it conveys an image of money and style.
To an extent, it's true that a designer label can convey an image of wealth, and even style. Some people pull it off great. When someone notes primarily what label(s) you wear, however, the clothes are overshadowing the man. Then, you don't look rich"”you look like your credit is overextended.
 

DSKent

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What I think is the most tacky is the logowear that makes fun of logowear, specifically the Dolce and Gabbana stuff ("I am wearing a FAKE Dolce and Gabbana Shirt", spray-painted "X" over D&G logo, etc.). Do people who wear this think it's clever? Well, it's not. And at $125 for a t-shirt, I think these sort of items do nothing except show the wearer's lack of both originality and taste.
 

pstoller

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What I think is the most tacky is the logowear that makes fun of logowear, specifically the Dolce and Gabbana stuff ("I am wearing a FAKE Dolce and Gabbana Shirt", spray-painted "X" over D&G logo, etc.). Do people who wear this think it's clever? Well, it's not. And at $125 for a t-shirt, I think these sort of items do nothing except show the wearer's lack of both originality and taste.
I sort of like those, although I prefer that the joke be just a tad more sophisticated (such as the Stussy riffs on the Louis Vuitton logo). I have to agree, though, that, at $125 a tee-shirt, the joke is on the guy who bought it.
 

LA Guy

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DSKent

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I sort of like those, although I prefer that the joke be just a tad more sophisticated (such as the Stussy riffs on the Louis Vuitton logo). I have to agree, though, that, at $125 a tee-shirt, the joke is on the guy who bought it.
Don't get me wrong here. I think the shirts are funny and it's nice that D&G has a sense of humor, but those who actually wear these shirts thinking they're 'fashionable' are rather pathetic.
 

Greg Weinstein

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In my opinion, clothes really do make the man. In a world of first impressions (at least where I'm from), the intial thing someones sees is what you look like and what you are wearing. Now what would a person think if they seen you wearing designer brands? They would think that you must be succesfull therefore have good money. I believe that by wearing such clothes that clearly display the brand logo, you are saying that not only do you have money, but you also have style. This is just me, but I like standing out in a crowd (in a good way of course), and by wearing designer clothes that are a little more flashy than regular clothes, I think it works.
 

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Timothy

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I would like to add another factor to this equation, and that would be the environment in which one lives. Personally I live in the Harrisburg Lancaster area of PA. Here most people may know of Gucci and Prada, but very few wear those labels let alone more discreet designers like Jil Sanders and ilk. If you're talking about logowear here it's the style G.H.A.P of Gap, Hilfiger, Abercrombie, and Polo. For the most part I don't care about having a huge tag emblazoned on my chest, but there are a few times I dress in a "conspicuous consumption" manner for fun. This is two parts, first to indulge in my skill at finding designer clothes cheap (like for example a logoed Versace t-shirt for $25, what I'm sure most pay retail for their dime-a-dozen shirts), and also to set myself apart from all the "˜clones' wearing those same shirts from the local mall. My fashion philosophy as of right now is that if I'm going to spend any considerable amount of money on (more) clothes (I don't need) I want it to look like it. This doesn't mean a big logo on it though, but it should have some flare (subtle or garish) to it to set it apart and give it some style. In the end this is not just an issue about flaunting a logo, but also an issue of access for me. Now if I lived in an area where everybody had equal access to the same clothes then I'm sure my shopping habits would be different, or then again more so the same with me either buying clothes from lesser known designers of other countries or just designing my own. There is also the factor of age, or better yet maturity, involved in this. In truth one dominant motivation for buying such items is that it's easier to catch the eye of a young lady in a club, and then seduce her (or at least make an attempt to
). The thing around here is that I have yet to find anyone who even knows what Zegna, or Canali, or any other similar label is. People seem not to appreciate the finer aspects of anything around these parts, whether it's fashion, or fine dining, or whatever so the effort is wasted. Case in point is that I have a pair of Tod's Ferrari driving loafers, but rarely wear them since sadly people have no understanding of what Tod's is (that and the fact that they're also suede on the bottom, so I want them to last for a while). I've met a local gal that had the same complaint when it came to her Tiffany bracelet. At least she appreciated the Tod's. One last note is that you don't need a logo on the front for it to be "conspicuous consumption" item, just look at the Burberry plaid fad. Even the argument against wearing a Kiton suit to an interview is also on a similar tangent of flaunting the image of prosperity through fashion. Fashion by its very nature is conspicuous. Now style, that's a bigger issue. . .
 

happydog

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I personally find the idea of logo clothing rather cynical: designers exact a premium for the goods, which in turn serve as roaming advertisements so they can sell more goods to more people at more premiums. It's a marketing scam that often preys on peoples' insecurities or designer-created wants. (No offense meant to anyone on this forum -- that's a general statement and not a comment on any particular poster.) I saw a quotation somewhere attributed to Beau Brummel that seems pertinent:  "If you noticed me, I was not well dressed."  Some might consider this an old-fashioned theory of dressing, but I think it's valuable.  In business, or in certain social circles, one is better off not calling attention directly to one's clothes (the point of the whole Kiton-suit-to-interviews debate).  That does not mean that one cannot seek or attain style in such settings, but style then becomes a question of (1) choosing and wearing elegant clothing that works more subliminally to convey one's taste, and (2) within those limits, finding more subtle ways to be individual, especially with carefuly chosen accessories.   Relying on logos to convey style is often a sign of consumer-culture pathology.
 

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