Collaring the angles on shirts and suits

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by quill, Jul 29, 2004.

  1. quill

    quill Senior member

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    This may have been a topic done to death, but if not, I'd be curious to see how you guys pick your shirt collars, and how they work with your suit collars/lapels.

    The basics seem obvious; spread collars for thinner faces, etc. But when it comes to suits with a narrow or wide lapel sweep, does that influence what shirt collars you'll wear in accompaniment? Are all these angles noticeable, or not worth worrying about? Does the theory of relativity come into play here, or is geometry getting in the way of just enjoying putting on a shirt and suitcoat?

    Thanks for whatever advice you have, and I'll take my answers off the air. (Oh wait...this isn't radio...)
     
  2. regularjoe

    regularjoe Senior member

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    I only wear spread collar shirts and I try to make sure the collar points are long enough that they are covered by the suit. In terms of spread severity, it factors more into the type of knot I tie my tie in.

    Point = Four in hand (I never use this though as I have almost no point collar shirts left)
    Spread = Half windsor to full windsor, maybe four in hand if tie is really thick
    Wide spreat/cutaway = Half windsor to full windsor
     
  3. TomW

    TomW Senior member

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    As I have a more square face and a rather short neck, I only wear point collars and the occassional semi-spread with fairly long points. I think fit is the most important item - nothing looks worse than a too tight or too loose collar - adding a tie only exacerbates the issue. As none of my suits or sport coats is too extreme in lapel width, I don't worry about it at all.

    My $0.02
     
  4. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    I wear a spread collar shirt with suits (end-on-end broadcloth) and a long-point buttondown collar with sport jackets (royal oxford), and tie a four-in-hand with both collars. I agree with Joe G that the spread collar should fit under the jacket. Here's an Alan Flusser discussion on shirt collars, circa 1984. Both his more recent books as well as Roetzel's "Gentleman" discuss this subject, but much hasn't changed. http://<a href="http://www.fashionma...7part2.htm</a>
     
  5. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I believe that, for most faces, the occassion has more to do with the appropriate collar than the face.

    For the city, I wear spread or tab collars and smoother textured shirtings. In the country, straight collars and more texture.

    Will
     
  6. TomW

    TomW Senior member

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    I respectfully disagree - I look ridiculous in a full spread collar at anytime. My short neck is emphasised by the breadth of collar making it even shorter. I do agree with you on texture - more polished for city wear more textured for country.
     
  7. Brian SD

    Brian SD Moderator

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    Generally I always wear spread collars with very short length. Seems to work best on me (long neck, medium-width face).
     
  8. quill

    quill Senior member

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    Thank you gents.

    You all make very valid...er...&quot;points&quot; (couldn't resist).
     

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