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Clear definition of 100s, 120s, etc.

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by cdelsolar, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. cdelsolar

    cdelsolar Member

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    I'm sorry about this question since it has probably been addressed before but I haven't been able to find a clear definition as to the methodology used.

    I know that the higher the number, the thinner or finer the thread is but how is the number derived?

    I once heard that the number is the length in meters of 1kg. worth of thread.

    Is this correct?[​IMG]

    Thank you for your help!
     

  2. Jovan

    Jovan Banned for Good

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    I forget exactly what it's from...

    What I do know is that it's a good idea to stay in the 100s-120s for suitings. They wear better over time, and there are some really luxurious suitings made in that grade despite the concept that "more/bigger is better" for a lot of things.
     

  3. scnupe7

    scnupe7 Distinguished Member

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    I'm sorry about this question since it has probably been addressed before but I haven't been able to find a clear definition as to the methodology used.

    I know that the higher the number, the thinner or finer the thread is but how is the number derived?

    I once heard that the number is the length in meters of 1kg. worth of thread.

    Is this correct?[​IMG]

    Thank you for your help!



    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I think it is the thread count per square inch.
     

  4. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    It's a code for maximum fiber diameter

    Originally, the # refers to the length in centimeters one woolen yarn can be stretched. Hence, Super 100's yarn is stretched to 100 centimeters, Super 120's to 120 cm and so on... but the use of these terms and their measurement is more precisely codified and set by fiber diameter range (see below)

     

  5. ezboy1000

    ezboy1000 Senior Member

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    I love the geek on this board. All the topics I can't talk to my buds about without having them stare incredulously at me are welcome here. Not only do you get your ostensible answer, but you get the minutiae that only SF members can provide.
     

  6. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Originally, the # refers to the length in centimeters one woolen yarn can be stretched. Hence, Super 100's yarn is stretched to 100 centimeters.
    Not exactly.

    The number refers to what the Yorkshire wool mechants call "count." Raw wool is brought to market in bales, weighed by the pound. The fibers are then spun into yarn in units called "hanks." One hank is a spool totallying 560 yards of yarn. (Spun yard makes up the threads that are woven into cloth.) "Count" refers to how many hanks you can spin out of one pound of raw wool. 80s count yields 80 hanks, and so on. The finer the raw wool fibers, the more hanks that can be spun from one pound of raw wool and the finer and smoother the resulting cloth will feel.

    However, the micronage reference list you posted is correct.
     

  7. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Not exactly.

    The number refers to what the Yorkshire wool mechants call "count." Raw wool is brought to market in bales, weighed by the pound. The fibers are then spun into yarn in units called "hanks." One hank is a spool totallying 560 yards of yarn. (Spun yard makes up the threads that are woven into cloth.) "Count" refers to how many hanks you can spin out of one pound of raw wool. 80s count yields 80 hanks, and so on. The finer the raw wool fibers, the more hanks that can be spun from one pound of raw wool and the finer and smoother the resulting cloth will feel.

    However, the micronage reference list you posted is correct.

    Looks like I may have vehiculated wrong information until now... I stand corrected

    Vive le metric system !!
     

  8. malloppa1

    malloppa1 New Member

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    I also have read a bout the # was measured on how many centimeters a yarn could be stretched before breakage hence a yarn that could be stretched 120cm before breaking was called s120.
    but what Manton posted also makes sense, maybe its a combination of the 2.
     

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