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Classic cocktails making a comeback

holymadness

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The industry has seen a resurgence of drinks that hark back to the prewar eras of Prohibition and the Great Depression, such as the Sidecar, the Old Fashioned and the Manhattan.

[...]

"You're seeing a lot of darker flavours - honeys, blackberries and raspberries, versus things like pomegranate and papaya," Cohen said. "When times are tough we want to go to things that are comfortable ... that are part of our history."


http://www.nationalpost.com/life/story.html?id=1123769

Wouldn't mind trying a Hemingway.
 

samblau

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Originally Posted by holymadness
The industry has seen a resurgence of drinks that hark back to the prewar eras of Prohibition and the Great Depression, such as the Sidecar, the Old Fashioned and the Manhattan.

[...]

"You're seeing a lot of darker flavours - honeys, blackberries and raspberries, versus things like pomegranate and papaya," Cohen said. "When times are tough we want to go to things that are comfortable ... that are part of our history."


http://www.nationalpost.com/life/story.html?id=1123769

Wouldn't mind trying a Hemingway.


White Star in lower Manhattan by Chinatown. Only bar I know of with classic absinthe service. They make the Hemingway as well as many other great cocktails at reasonable (for NYC prices) $10 or so.
 

Huntsman

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The hardcore classic cocktail scene has been a phenomenon that's been "in the wild" for about 5-7 years, and a quieter sensation amongst devotees for over a decade.

A problem, however, with many of these classics is that they are made without the tradition they seemingly espouse -- a whisky sour with sour mix or some such is a travesty. As is a sidecar with some generic Triple Sec. Even now it is hard to find classic cocktails that are authentic and worthy of the name.

~ H
 

rdawson808

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Originally Posted by Huntsman
A problem, however, with many of these classics is that they are made without the tradition they seemingly espouse -- a whisky sour with sour mix or some such is a travesty. As is a sidecar with some generic Triple Sec. Even now it is hard to find classic cocktails that are authentic and worthy of the name.

~ H


Hell, I find the bigger problem is finding a bartender who knows how to make anything other than a Cosmo or a glass full of vodka. Don't they train these idiots?

Typical exchange:

Me: I'd like a Rob Roy.
Bartender: Sure thing....what's that exactly?
Me: <Sigh>...

Or worse yet, they make it with dry vermouth. Ugh.
 

Gus

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On the plus side, there are more, great tasting affordable brands of liquor. I can't believe the good bourbons available for $15-$25 a bottle, perfect straight or with good ingredients for a tasty cocktail.
 

Johnny_5

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Originally Posted by rdawson808
Hell, I find the bigger problem is finding a bartender who knows how to make anything other than a Cosmo or a glass full of vodka. Don't they train these idiots?

Typical exchange:

Me: I'd like a Rob Roy.
Bartender: Sure thing....what's that exactly?
Me: <Sigh>...

Or worse yet, they make it with dry vermouth. Ugh.


That would be a dry rob roy...duh.

I also hate how everythig is related to the state of the economy. That shit is so lame. Maybe people realize that certain things are classic for reason; because they're good.
 

Huntsman

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Originally Posted by rdawson808
Hell, I find the bigger problem is finding a bartender who knows how to make anything other than a Cosmo or a glass full of vodka. Don't they train these idiots? Typical exchange: Me: I'd like a Rob Roy. Bartender: Sure thing....what's that exactly? Me: <Sigh>... Or worse yet, they make it with dry vermouth. Ugh.
Yeah, but the training is to meet the demands of the customer, and by and large that does not mean an education in the classics. My favorite Rob Roy story is when I walked into a bar, and noticed a bottle of sweet vermouth. I'm now really happy to have a Rob Roy to start. I say to the barkeep, "That bottle of vermouth tells me I can get a Rob Roy here, can do?" The barman assents, and I add "make it with Jameson's, up, thanks." It has a....funny color. Well, I don't use M&R vermouth, so it's probably that. I taste, and what the....? I apparently couldn't keep it off my face, and the I asked the concerned-looking bartender what was in it -- it was 2:1 Jameson's to maraschino cherry juice. You might enjoy this: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...IG3CI3E761.DTL Both sides have some value. As a patron, I will lay off a complicated drink in a packed house, but then again on the other side it seems that many barkeeps never want the challenge of a Manhattan, not that they're really that annoying. ~H
 

Milhouse

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I often make manhattans myself as they are my favorite drink. They seem really easy to make. However, they must be incredibly difficult to make as I've only had a few done well at bars and restaurants.

That article said manhattans have too many ingredients...3 ingredients plus a cherry. How about all those girly drinks that have like 5 ingredients? What about a long island ice tea???
 

Flambeur

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Luckily there are more than a couple of local places famous for their old-fashioned and manhattan. I've been doing that for a while now.
 

rdawson808

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Originally Posted by Johnny_5
That would be a dry rob roy...duh.

Which I've never ordered. I always order a Rob Roy, which in every bartending book I've seen is made with sweet vermouth. With dry vermouth it's called a Dry Rob Roy and with both sweet and dry it's called a Perfect Rob Roy.

b
 

rdawson808

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And as to this idea that some drinks are too hard too make because of too many ingredients, like the Manhattan, and I suppose the Rob Roy which is just a variation: that's just pitiful. A straight up Manhattan is easy to make.

However, if you're the picky customer who wants it just that way, tell the bartender beforehand and tip accordingly.

b
 

Johnny Amiga

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I'm still having nightmares over an old-fashioned I got at one local place. The glass was topped with soda. If the place hadn't been so crowded (and I hadn't been so drunk and thirsty), I would've gone back to complain to the bartender about how the drink he served me was no old-fashioned.

Luckily the drink in question is real easy to make at home and is tasty even with cheaper bourbons. Def my favorite drink these days, along with Ward8.
 

Douglas

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Originally Posted by Huntsman
My favorite Rob Roy story is when I walked into a bar, and noticed a bottle of sweet vermouth. I'm now really happy to have a Rob Roy to start. I say to the barkeep, "That bottle of vermouth tells me I can get a Rob Roy here, can do?" The barman assents, and I add "make it with Jameson's, up, thanks."

I'll preface this by saying that although I have long enjoyed old fashioneds, I'm not a conoisseur of these things. However, Huntsman, as you seem to be something of a snob, I'll ask this question.

Asking for a Rob Roy with Irish whisky kind of destroys the whole concept, doesn't it? Having some Scottish blood, I'm actually inclined to be offended.
 

King Francis

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I've been up all night and could go for a Brandy Alexander right now.
 

Huntsman

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Originally Posted by Douglas
I'll preface this by saying that although I have long enjoyed old fashioneds, I'm not a conoisseur of these things. However, Huntsman, as you seem to be something of a snob, I'll ask this question. Asking for a Rob Roy with Irish whisky kind of destroys the whole concept, doesn't it? Having some Scottish blood, I'm actually inclined to be offended.
I'd hoped I didn't come across as a snob, at least in that I don't think I speak poorly of people who just don't know any better. As for the Rob Roy, well I don't know. I make them with Johnnie Black, but I didn't see any there. I really like Jameson, much more than.....I guess it was Dewar's that I saw, which I really dislike. I like to think that when you have some respect for how things are supposed to be that is the time when one can alter the 'rules' to suit one's taste, and perhaps, the circumstances. Begging your pardon all the same.
Originally Posted by King Francis
I've been up all night and could go for a Brandy Alexander right now.
Supposedly the original Alexander was made with gin, which is why the Brandy Alexander is the Brandy Alexander. I've done it with Plymouth. Odd. Eminently drinkable, though. I like them both. ~ H
 

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