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Champagne

drizzt3117

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I would agree that it's more common for Champagne to be had before the meal, and I think you'd have to have something fairly insubstantial to drink Champagne throughout, as I can't imagine it standing up to say, lamb, or filet mignon.
 

Styleman

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(Styleman @ Jan. 17 2005,17:22) I understood what you were saying about the champagne with the foie gras, and scallops. As I thought, wine is better, but quite often with the company I am with, wine does not meet their tastes.
Here are suggestions, taken from a French website. Â I think it's pretty self-explanatory, or does it need translation? Pour les entrÃ
es : poissons, crustacÃ
s, jambon un champagne très sec, un BRUT. Par exemple : GASTON CHIQUET tradition Brut, DEVAUX cuvÃ
e D, PIPER-HEIDSIECK cuvÃ
e rare. Pour le foie gras, un demi-sec, plus rond s'impose : VEUVE CLIQUOT 1/2 sec, pour les plats à base de truffes, plus aromatisÃ
e, un Brut millÃ
simÃ
d'au moins 10 ans. Pour les plats : poissons, crustacÃ
s chauds, un champagne jeune 92-93 MUMM CORDON ROUGE, NICOLAS FEUILLATTE cuvÃ
e Palmes d'Or, FLEURY cuvÃ
e Fleur de l'Europe. Pour les gibiers à plumes : un champagne fruitÃ
, puissant, millÃ
simÃ
: RENE GEOFFROY cuvÃ
e SÃ
lection, BOLLINGER grande annÃ
e de 90. Pour la volaille et viande blanche : champagne Brut millÃ
simÃ
de 85 Ã 93. Fromages : le champagne se marie bien avec POMMERY WINTERTIME Desserts : c'est plus dÃ
licat. Il vaut mieux Ã
viter le champagne et le servir après le repas. A ce moment-là , on choisit du sublime KRUGG 88, DON PERIGNON rosÃ
90, BOLLINGER R.D 81, POMMERY cuvÃ
e Louise 88, etc... Autres choix : Avec du saumon lÃ
gèrement fumÃ
: une VEUVE CLIQUOT RosÃ
. Avec une viande comme l'agneau, une poularde ou du gibier à plumes, une VEUVE PONSARDIN RosÃ
.
A few words please: crustacÃ
s très sec, un BRUT à base de truffes, plus aromatisÃ
e, crustacÃ
s chauds les gibiers à plumes puissant, millÃ
simÃ
gèrement viande comme l'agneau
 

Fabienne

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Although I do not wish to be disrespectful, and I would say though the finest cuisine is indeed French, etiquette is a British, and even more so a Swiss forte.
Britain and Switzerland can do whatever they wish with French champagne, but France is allowed continue with its own traditions and etiquette.
 

Styleman

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(Styleman @ Jan. 17 2005,17:33) Although I do not wish to be disrespectful, and I would say though the finest cuisine is indeed French, etiquette is a British, and even more so a Swiss forte.
Britain and Switzerland can do whatever they wish with French champagne, but France is allowed continue with its own traditions and etiquette. Â

I know its very stupid that we take your drink, and drink it in a different way.
 

Fabienne

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crustacÃ
s = any of those little critters from the sea covered with a hard shell.
très sec, un BRUT = Very dry
à base de truffes, plus aromatisÃ
e, = dishes with truffles (I suppose any variety of black or white), whose aroma is very pungent
crustacÃ
s chauds = above critters served hot
les gibiers à plumes = game with feathers. :O))
puissant, millÃ
simÃ
= powerful, vintage year
gèrement = slightly, lightly
viande comme l'agneau = meats such as lamb
 

Fabienne

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(Fabienne @ Jan. 17 2005,22:42)
Originally Posted by Styleman,Jan. 17 2005,17:33
Although I do not wish to be disrespectful, and I would say though the finest cuisine is indeed French, etiquette is a British, and even more so a Swiss forte.
Britain and Switzerland can do whatever they wish with French champagne, but France is allowed continue with its own traditions and etiquette. Â

I know its very stupid that we take your drink, and drink it in a different way.
No, it's not, it's beautiful. Make it yours, enjoy it.
 

Styleman

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On Saturday evening I had This menu which consisted of a palet clensing dish of lentils followed by seared Foie Gras, followed by scallops, followed by Venison, followed by Red Mullet, followed by Prune and Amarac soufle, finishing with a cheese board. We began with Martini dry at a nearby bar, followed by a bottle of Dom Perignon 95, and then a Krug Grand Curvee 88, and then Alain Thienot NV, and then Paradis Cognac. What are the views? Perhaps too heavy a meal for just Champagne (Similar style dishes)
 

Styleman

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crustacÃ
s = any of those little critters from the sea covered with a hard shell.
très sec, un BRUT = Very dry
à base de truffes, plus aromatisÃ
e, = dishes with truffles (I suppose any variety of black or white), whose aroma is very pungent
crustacÃ
s chauds = above critters served hot
les gibiers à plumes = game with feathers.  :O))
puissant, millÃ
simÃ
= powerful, vintage year
gèrement = slightly, lightly
viande comme l'agneau  = meats such as lamb
Thank you.
 

drizzt3117

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In my opinion, that's too heavy a meal to serve with Champagne, but if you enjoyed it, that's all that matters. I would have served a nice bordeaux or cab with the venison.
 

Fabienne

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On Saturday evening I had This menu which consisted of a palet clensing dish of lentils followed by seared Foie Gras, followed by scallops, followed by Venison, followed by Red Mullet, followed by Prune and Amarac soufle, finishing with a cheese board. We began with Martini dry at a nearby bar, followed by a bottle of Dom Perignon 95, and then a Krug Grand Curvee 88, and then Alain Thienot NV, and then Paradis Cognac. What are the views? Perhaps too heavy a meal for just Champagne (Similar style dishes)
Why not? I wouldn't, but that's only because of my lack of appreciation for champagne. It was a prune and armagnac souffle, wasn't it? Prune as in liqueur de prune, or prune as in plum? They served cheese last?.
 

Styleman

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Originally Posted by Styleman,Jan. 17 2005,17:58
On Saturday evening I had This menu which consisted of a palet clensing dish of lentils followed by seared Foie Gras, followed by scallops, followed by Venison, followed by Red Mullet, followed by Prune and Amarac soufle, finishing with a cheese board. We began with Martini dry at a nearby bar, followed by a bottle of Dom Perignon 95, and then a Krug Grand Curvee 88, and then Alain Thienot NV, and then Paradis Cognac. What are the views? Perhaps too heavy a meal for just Champagne (Similar style dishes) Why not? Â I wouldn't, but that's only because of my lack of appreciation for champagne. It was a prune and armagnac souffle, wasn't it? Â Prune as in liqueur de prune, or prune as in plum? They served cheese last?.
Yes, prune and armagnac souffle, prune as in plum. No cheese was before the desert, sorry for the error. What are your views on seared Foie Gras, personaly I find it a horrible way to serve it, I much prefer it spread on melba toast from the musolin with a knife diped in warm water.
 

drizzt3117

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I really like seared foie gras, especially with the right wine pairing. It is nice served country style as well, when I was at restaurant "Alsace" in Paris, they served it country style with baguettes and it was surprisingly good.
 

Styleman

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I really like seared foie gras, especially with the right wine pairing.  It is nice served country style as well, when I was at restaurant "Alsace" in Paris, they served it country style with baguettes and it was surprisingly good.
How do you preffer it?
 

drizzt3117

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seared with a port wine reduction, served with a nice Sauternes. I had this exact combination at Prime several months ago, looking forward to something similar at Bouchon this weekend.
 

Fabienne

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I might order a raw one through D'artagnan, invite a full table of friends, and see how it goes over. I've never had foie gras other than in the traditional jar presentation. It's good enough for me, and I'm a little apprehensive about cooking a raw one.
 

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