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CG's Artisan & Farmstead Cheese Threak

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Cary Grant, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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  2. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Bonus cheese... Marieke Gouda Six-Year
    Earlier I reviewed Marieke's Gouda which is aged 9-12 months. Here's the first cheese she ever made then put away for six years. Outstanding and one-of-a-kind.

    For comparison again, here is the 9-12mo.
    [​IMG]

    And here after aging six years.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    What knife do you use for which cheese? And how do you cut (press down or "saw")?
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
  4. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Generally, always press, never saw. You want clean cuts, straight down.

    Cheese knives for consumers, IMO, break into two categories:

    • personal preference
    • practical


    There are myriad handle and blade shapes and for the most part it's personal preference. Because they are often presented on a cheese board at parties, etc. there's more reason to consider the "art" of them rather than simply utility. Artisan cheese is an "affordable luxury" so many people want a knife that reflects that will still being functional. Truth be told - I've seen too many that err on the side of art and are not fun to actually use.
    The practical comes in with:

    How hard is the cheese? How "sticky" is it when cutting. You need heft for the first and less surface area for the second.

    Somebody gave me these and I find I use the two on the right quite often. The hard cheese knife is handy for breaking very hard cheeses. The other does a decent job with softer, stickier/gripper cheeses.

    [​IMG]

    The better knife for sticky cheese is something like Global's with as little surface area as possible.

    [​IMG]

    For the softest cheeses, at least for photography I actually just use a sturdy piece of fishing line.

    Having a chisel/spade is handy for breaking big chunks of parm, gouda and the like:

    [​IMG]
    You can use ordinary heavy knives as I did in the pic above- but if the cheese cleaves, down goes your knife tip into the slate.

    On the commercial/practical side, for larger/whole cheeses, there's one cutter you could use for just about everything and that's a commercial cheese wire cutter from Handee. Takes a little practice but once you get the hang of it it's the best way for breaking wheels, slicing quarters etc. But 99% of consumers don't need this.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
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  5. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    that six year gouda looks sick!! I take it it's not for sale?
     
  6. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Only what she had at the shop in Madison I believe.
    She ages a gouda 18mo's plus under the category "super" but it's nothing like this.

    Roomano is a little similar- aged 3-4 years. Murray's has it.
     
  7. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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  8. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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  9. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Some of you will appreciate this thoughtful article on the growing extinction of France's heritage cheeses. Artisans are challenged at every turn to compete with the mass-produced and public whim.
    Not to mention nonsensical challenges to raw milk.


    Fromage under fire: Why French cheese faces extinction



    [​IMG]
    Image [​IMG] Rachel Bajada
     
  10. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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  11. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Day #26: Dunbarton Blue - Wisconsin
    A cheddar-blue like the Red Rock above

    [​IMG]
     
  12. apack

    apack Senior member

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    Nonetheless, Kerrygold makes good cheese. To my mind it is the best of the large commercial cheesemakers. Relatively inexpensive, and it lasts a long time, so we usually have some of their aged cheddar around the house for when we run out of fresh cheese.
     
  13. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Yup- nothing wrong with Kerrygold in terms of quality of product.
     
  14. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012
  15. apack

    apack Senior member

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    Inspired by this thread, I'm going to take my daughter down to Pastoral today and get a selection of nice cheeses. So many good choices...

    They have the Ossau-Iraty and Pleasant Ridge Reserve, so we'll give those a try based on the recommendations here since we like those styles of cheese.

    They also have Sar Vecchio, and we could use some parmigiano (style) cheese, but I didn't know that there was any good US production of this type of cheese. Is the Sar Vecchio good?

    Also, what about a blue? They have the Stichelton, but I usually prefer blues that are creamier, like Cashel and Roaring Forties. They have a couple of new (to me) American Cheeses for Cheese Month -- how about Point Reyes Blue or Cave Man Blue?
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012
  16. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    All the blues you mention are very good. Pt. Reyes might be the creamier of the bunch. They should have Rogue River now... it's a very limited cheese and more $$$ but it's outstanding.

    They have "Up in Smoke" a goat cheese wrapped in maple leaves and smoked that's getting a lot of notice lately but I have yet to have it:

    Sar vecchio- many people like it but I'd rather have the Italian like Cravero.
     
  17. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    I can get cypress grove truffle tremor, purple haze, cowgirls mt tam, jasper hill Harbison. What to get?
     
  18. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Pt. Reyes Blue is so common here that it is easy to forget what a good cheese it is.
     
  19. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Rogue River is a delicious cheese. Easily my favorite domestic blue.

    Lately, I've been getting very nice Vacherin Mont d'Or.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012
  20. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Purple Haze is the rare cheese "with something on it/in it" I really like. It's fresh chevre dusted in lavender and fennel pollen. Great for crackers. Prefer it over the truffled cheese.

    Mt. Tam is a solid triple cream. Straight-forward & rich. As long as it isn't too firm or verging on turning to a squishy mess- it's good.

    Harbison- I've yet to have one that wowed me- overrated in my opinion.
     

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