CG's Artisan & Farmstead Cheese Threak

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Cary Grant, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    The wild and the pure.
    

    Had it again last night and it was awful. Either they need more consistency or the window for eating is very short.
     
  2. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Day #21: Teahive & Seahive - Utah
    Basically the same cheese, two different rubs. Neither particularly interesting.

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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2012
  3. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    I reposted an article about them a littlw while back- here it is at Culture.

    They're only been making a few months.

    Is Bollie's a soft-rpiened? I know it's a sheep/goat blend. Guessing it should be fairly lactic/citric? What was different between them?
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2012
  4. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Ah- I see: Bollies Mollies

    I might guess the bad one was bitter/ammonia? or was it just flat?
     
  5. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Wisconsin originals from Friday- all cheeses are relatively new/recent in the American movement:

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  6. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    The first one had a very nice acidity which was perfect for quite a hot day. The texture was slightly crumbly and the rind had a bit of a mushroom scent. The second was, to me, dead in flavor and aroma, and was a bit waxy in texture. My wife found it soapy.
     
  7. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Day #22: Rupert -Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont
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    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  8. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Hey Ed- how was the cheddar??
     
  9. edmorel

    edmorel Quality Seller!! Dubiously Honored

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    I can't guote your post CG, I've been having problems with that, the PM and the "like" functions. Anyway, I just had a nibble as I was eating a raw milk Parmigiano all weekened (Eataly's house brand 36 month aged, I love it but it always upsets my stomach :lookaround:) . The nibble I had tasted creamy and mild, relative to the irish supermarket cheddar that I always get (Kerry's I think?, They also do a butter). It didn't taste as "industrialized" if that makes any sense. I plan on eating it tonight so will let you know my full thoughts.
     
  10. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Cool- That cheddar was probably "Kerrygold".

    Trivia: Kerrygold is the umbrella brand now for marketing Irish dairy products globally- BIG company... the Irish Dairy Board. They recently purchased DPI Foods here in the US which is also an enormous company/distributor here with tens of thousands of products.

    A little larger than James Montgomery's handmade operation ;)
     
  11. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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  12. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Bonus cheese... Marieke Gouda Six-Year
    Earlier I reviewed Marieke's Gouda which is aged 9-12 months. Here's the first cheese she ever made then put away for six years. Outstanding and one-of-a-kind.

    For comparison again, here is the 9-12mo.
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    And here after aging six years.
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  13. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    What knife do you use for which cheese? And how do you cut (press down or "saw")?
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
  14. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Generally, always press, never saw. You want clean cuts, straight down.

    Cheese knives for consumers, IMO, break into two categories:

    • personal preference
    • practical


    There are myriad handle and blade shapes and for the most part it's personal preference. Because they are often presented on a cheese board at parties, etc. there's more reason to consider the "art" of them rather than simply utility. Artisan cheese is an "affordable luxury" so many people want a knife that reflects that will still being functional. Truth be told - I've seen too many that err on the side of art and are not fun to actually use.
    The practical comes in with:

    How hard is the cheese? How "sticky" is it when cutting. You need heft for the first and less surface area for the second.

    Somebody gave me these and I find I use the two on the right quite often. The hard cheese knife is handy for breaking very hard cheeses. The other does a decent job with softer, stickier/gripper cheeses.

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    The better knife for sticky cheese is something like Global's with as little surface area as possible.

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    For the softest cheeses, at least for photography I actually just use a sturdy piece of fishing line.

    Having a chisel/spade is handy for breaking big chunks of parm, gouda and the like:

    [​IMG]
    You can use ordinary heavy knives as I did in the pic above- but if the cheese cleaves, down goes your knife tip into the slate.

    On the commercial/practical side, for larger/whole cheeses, there's one cutter you could use for just about everything and that's a commercial cheese wire cutter from Handee. Takes a little practice but once you get the hang of it it's the best way for breaking wheels, slicing quarters etc. But 99% of consumers don't need this.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012

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