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Cell Phone Etiquette (Big Deal or Not?)

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by singhstyle, Mar 6, 2009.

  1. auto90403

    auto90403 Senior member

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    Using a cell at the table, texting, whatever, is inconsiderate if the people you're with object. Or if they're likely to object.

    What other people do at neighboring tables is their business.

    The gray area is when you can hear a person at another table on his cell chattering away. This seems to be more offensive than two people having a face to face convo you can overhear. Circumstances will determine if cell phoner is inconsiderate.

    Not sure rude is the right word in these situations, however. Rude implies something deliberate.
     
  2. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member

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    Funny how when cellphones first came out in the 80's you were considered a big-timer by having one.

    Now it's the exact opposite. the Big-timers make it hard for you to reach him, while the small-time wanna bes are constantly chatting on the phone.



    12 years ago in HK, I was amused to sit in a decent-ish restaurant for lunch and watch teenage couples on dates carefully place glitzy his'n'hers cellphones on the table next to their cutlery. The more advanced might refer to that gesture as a tribal marking, perhaps.
     
  3. Souper

    Souper Senior member

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    12 years ago in HK, I was amused to sit in a decent-ish restaurant for lunch and watch teenage couples on dates carefully place glitzy his'n'hers cellphones on the table next to their cutlery. The more advanced might refer to that gesture as a tribal marking, perhaps.

    I'm in college. I still do this at lunch, as do a few of my friends. We go to some pretty good places for lunch. I have a free phone, its not about displaying status at all; really just about convenience and the fact that there's a lot of stuff going on for me around lunch time, and I'm usually rushing around trying to get things done and meet up with different people. It's not noticable at all really, it just sits there next to my water unless something comes up.
     
  4. TGPlastic

    TGPlastic Senior member

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  5. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    12 years ago in HK, I was amused to sit in a decent-ish restaurant for lunch and watch teenage couples on dates carefully place glitzy his'n'hers cellphones on the table next to their cutlery. The more advanced might refer to that gesture as a tribal marking, perhaps.

    Sitting down with a cell phone (a bulky one from 12 years ago if I may add) is not comfortable. If I'm not wearing a jacket I almost always place my cell phone on a table. However, it will be off, if having a meal or serious discussion.
     
  6. chucklehead

    chucklehead Member

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    many people text / email / or otherwise use their phone to disconnect from what ever group they are in because they are afraid to connect with the group they are in. sometimes in boils down to insecurity. that doesn't make them bad, rude perhaps.

    unless he's sexting someone, that would be very rude.
     
  7. rdawson808

    rdawson808 Senior member

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    12 years ago in HK, I was amused to sit in a decent-ish restaurant for lunch and watch teenage couples on dates carefully place glitzy his'n'hers cellphones on the table next to their cutlery. The more advanced might refer to that gesture as a tribal marking, perhaps.

    On a related note, there is an interesting article by some economists in Liverpool (if memory serves) explaining how men and women use their cell phones differently in public and concluded that the phone was used as a lekking device by the men. That is, like peacock feathers, the males used them as a means of attracting the opposite sex by showing off their importance (constant need to check for messages) or wealth (fancy phone).

    They likened this, amusingly, to teenage girls who used their cellphones (and the phonebooks in them) to develop social status by showing how popular they are.

    So perhaps these people we see at dinner tables using their cellphones are, in their minds at least, not being rude, but are trying to attract a mate or build their social network. Of course, the rest of us can still think it's rude.

    b
     
  8. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

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    It's inexcusable to talk on the phone while at the table with another diner. Ringers should be on silence during that time as well while dining.

    The two above things should be absolute. I find it irritating and inconsiderate to fellow humans to be on a phone, amongst a group of strangers or acquaintances, and talk in a normal or loud voice.

    I'm just afraid that we become more and more complacent with this type of behavior and that it just becomes the norm.
     
  9. KenN

    KenN Senior member

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    I keep my cellphone on silent all the time. I think all ring tones should be abolished on cellphones.
     
  10. constant struggle

    constant struggle Senior member

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    I need to keep my cell phone on 24/7 to be available for work, I can't keep it on silent either.
     
  11. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    On a related note, there is an interesting article by some economists in Liverpool (if memory serves) explaining how men and women use their cell phones differently in public and concluded that the phone was used as a lekking device by the men. That is, like peacock feathers, the males used them as a means of attracting the opposite sex by showing off their importance (constant need to check for messages) or wealth (fancy phone).


    b



    brits = [​IMG]
     
  12. Cordwinder

    Cordwinder Senior member

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    went clubbing with friends a while back when a friend get a phone call in his cell and starts talking really loud to make up for the loud music in the club. I went up to him and said if he needed to take the call, to go outside and talk normally so the other person doesnt hurt their ears listening to you.

    The next few times we went out together, he would bring it up, making me the wrong in the situation. With the cellphones with caller id (mine can id international calls too), it would be easier to yell once, "I will call back in a minute", hang up, find a quiet place to call back and have the conversation.

    I stopped hanging with him (total loser, left the country) but with other friends, we dont mind short calls. We all run our own businesses and customers sometimes forget the time and call us in odd times.
     
  13. jagmqt

    jagmqt Senior member

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    I need to keep my cell phone on 24/7 to be available for work, I can't keep it on silent either.


    So when it rings, do you answer it in front of your guests and carry on a conversation, or do you excuse yourself and take the call privately?

    I think anyone would understand a work requirement if the phone rings, I don't think that excuses poor manners to have a conversation in front of everyone.


    jag
     
  14. rdawson808

    rdawson808 Senior member

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    I need to keep my cell phone on 24/7 to be available for work, I can't keep it on silent either.

    That deserves some explanation. Are you an ER surgeon? Do you have a client on death row? I'm afraid far too many peopel think their phone calls are that important. Defend yourself man! [​IMG]

    b
     
  15. why

    why Senior member

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    That deserves some explanation. Are you an ER surgeon? Do you have a client on death row?

    No, but when a client needs something it's always a more pressing matter than my burger and fries.
     
  16. otc

    otc Senior member

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    mobile phone + dinner table = no

    If there is something you need to take (I think someone mentioned making evening plans with friends where the communication really needs to happen around dinner time and calling back in an hour won't work) just excuse yourself from the table.
     
  17. rdawson808

    rdawson808 Senior member

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    No, but when a client needs something it's always a more pressing matter than my burger and fries.

    Is it more pressing than being polite to your dinner companions?

    b
     
  18. Connemara

    Connemara Senior member

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    I have seen people in a restaurant texting away and paying no attention to each other. Pathetic!
     
  19. Master-Classter

    Master-Classter Senior member

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    But one area that I think should, and probably will become very taboo, is engaging in some kind of transaction with someone (retail POS or service desk...bank, etc) while trying to carry on a cell phone conversation. That's right up their with spitting in someone's face afaic. I'm seeing a lot of "no cell phones" signs at POS counters now, so I don't think I'm out to lunch on that one.

    Why is this such a big deal... I don't know the person at the counter, I've picked out soemthing and they're ringing it up for me. There's no need to interact, and they're performing some basic function. and I'm saying this as a guy who's worked behind the counter. As long as it doesn't interfere with my ability to hand them the item and my credit card, why is it an issue?
    (I'm not being defensive, aggressive, etc. Just genuinely curious - it strikes me as more rude to talk on the phone for a while during a 1on1 date while the other person is literally just waiting for you to get off the phone)
     
  20. Neo_Version 7

    Neo_Version 7 Senior member

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    I don't own a cellphone.
     

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