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Caviar

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Aristocrat, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. Aristocrat

    Aristocrat Senior member

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    Hi, I'm a big fan of caviar and my question is just what brand and type of caviar you most like?

    My favourite is Tsar Nicoulai, black beluga or sevruga, lets call it a tie [​IMG] .
     
  2. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Honestly, I prefer salmon roe to caviar.
     
  3. Aristocrat

    Aristocrat Senior member

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    No way man! It's to bitter.
     
  4. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    I've never had that problem. I find caviar too salty -- though I still love it, just not as much as salmon roe. I like the mouthfeel of bursting each single salmon egg. Briny and rich, like tasting the ocean.
     
  5. Aristocrat

    Aristocrat Senior member

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    Haha yeah it does taste like ocean, though i think the berluga is more smooth and sweeter to eat.
     
  6. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    trout love it! [​IMG]
     
  7. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Melon caviar from El Bulli. [​IMG]
     
  8. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  9. pejsek

    pejsek Senior member

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    Sadly, I'm afraid the glory days of caviar eating are behind us. As an exchange student in the old Soviet Union (circa 1984) I consumed perhaps a lifetime's worth of caviar (ditto with the vodka washing it down). Now it may have just been the hunger talking, but I don't think so. (It was a kind of feast or famine existence: you were either forcing down a bowl of cabbage soup with lard in the cafeteria or you were out on the town trying to spend those non-convertible rubles on taxis and elaborate multi-course restaurant meals, often, quite naturally, starting with caviar.) I recall the caviar tasting as the purest essence of the sea. The caviar I've tasted since then has never failed to disappoint and I'm sure capitalism is to blame. Back in the day, caviar was a source of hard currency for the Soviet regime. Quality control was high and stocks were carefully guarded (after all, only a fool would have been caught poaching or cheating; one of Brezhnev's cronies was actually executed for his role in a con by which caviar was smuggled abroad in herring tins). After the fall of the Soviet regime it seems that everyone in the vicinity of the Caspian Sea with a rowboat tried to get themselves at least a couple of sturgeon. The last time I bought caviar was a tin of osetra in Prague in the mid 1990s and (though purchased from a reputable source) it was a foul concoction--fishy, oily, overly salted. I prefer to just live with the memories, I guess (esp. here in San Francisco where dungeness crab with a bottle of Corton-Charlemagne--if you aren't buying caviar you can splurge just a little on the wine--and a nice sourdough baguette seems a fair trade-off). I've heard good things about Iranian caviar. I believe Petrossian's top offering is now Iranian. And that makes sense to me since it's probably just as silly to f with the Iranian govt as it was to do the same with the old Soviet authorities.
     
  10. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    I once saw in an episode of Carmen Sandiego: The Animated Series that the Soviets were swimming in so much caviar that they were feeding the low-grade stuff to their cats -- Russian blues, natch.
     
  11. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    During the Soviet days, furs and caviar were their only source of hard currency-along with selling the old Czarist art objects.

    Despite its elitist reputation, caviar was or is a very commonplace food in Russia. Of course, there are different grades to be expected.

    Iranian caviar is believed to be superior to Russian caviar apparently.
     
  12. pejsek

    pejsek Senior member

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  13. DM.ru

    DM.ru Well-Known Member

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    I, as the Russian, prefer red cariar...and not only because of the $$$... what can be better of so-called ""pyatiminutka" fresh red caviar saulted for half an hour ?
     
  14. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    During the Soviet days, furs and caviar were their only source of hard currency-along with selling the old Czarist art objects.

    Despite its elitist reputation, caviar was or is a very commonplace food in Russia. Of course, there are different grades to be expected.

    Iranian caviar is believed to be superior to Russian caviar apparently.



    I respectfully disagree. Caviar was never a commonplace food, at least during the Socialist era. Anything that could be reliably exported by the state was not to be sold to the locals. There were special stores in the big cities that sold "Export-only" goods including caviar that only accepted hard currency of the Western Block. Kind of ironic, since the Soviet ruble was officially pegged as 1:1 to USD. The problem was the state would not exchange any rubles for you. It ended up as with everything else in USSR the people who had caviar had to get it on the black market or through "connecitons."
     
  15. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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  16. pejsek

    pejsek Senior member

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  17. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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  18. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    We have this little Russian store that sells different grades of red caviar in bulk. I much prefer red caviar to anything else. I have a small circle of Russian friends, and they too seem to favor red caviar.
     
  19. Aus_MD

    Aus_MD Senior member

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    Best caviar: Almas

    Other fish roe that are much better value: flying fish roe (try it in any sea food soup); sea urchin (an acquired taste).
     
  20. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    flying fish roe (try it in any sea food soup)
    Do you just sprinkle a bit on top immediately before serving?
     

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