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Cashmere Sweater Hierarchy

fabricateurialist

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Sorry, can't understand this sentence.

Shorthand
short·hand
noun
  • a short and simple way of expressing or referring to something.
    "poetry for him is simply a shorthand for literature that has aesthetic value"


    brands are a shorthand for (levels of) quality, respectively
 

DorianGreen

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Shorthand
short·hand
noun
  • a short and simple way of expressing or referring to something.
    "poetry for him is simply a shorthand for literature that has aesthetic value"


    brands are a shorthand for (levels of) quality, respectively

You mean, William Lockie (for example) is a shorthand for a certain level of quality. I think it could be somehow subjective and controversial, and of course prone to temporal fluctuations.
 

HotDilf

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Johnston's of Elgin where I got to see and actually touch/feel different qualities made for different brands side-by-side
Loro Piana and Zegna, their cloth qualities cover a wide range of qualities from the ones used for their own brand, cloth books for tailors, and yarns and fabrics provided to brands

For instance, Hermès blankets made by JoE are better quality (i.e. use better materials) than JoE-branded blankets?

Similarly, are you suggesting that LP- and Zegna-branded jumpers uses the best materials for their own house, and supplies the rest (yarn or fabric of inferior quality) to tailors and other brands?
 

fabricateurialist

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For instance, Hermès blankets made by JoE are better quality (i.e. use better materials) than JoE-branded blankets?

Similarly, are you suggesting that LP- and Zegna-branded jumpers uses the best materials for their own house, and supplies the rest (yarn or fabric of inferior quality) to tailors and other brands?

I am literally saying that they process different qualities based on customer specifications

also, seeing the H blankets piled sky-high in a corner of the warehouse certainly removes any myths surrounding luxury 😂
 

HotDilf

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@happydayz1 & @Zc94, thank you for your input. I was curious about the moisture/sweat-wicking properties of merino wool compared to cashmere. It seems merino is the best option when it comes to this feature: outdoor wear brands use it religiously for hiking, for instance.

Usually I’d just wear a cotton t shirt underneath the mid layer.

P.S. I’m in the north east US, it’s usually very very hot in the buildings in the winter.

Zc, I completely agree - modern buildings are over-heated. In a previous post I mentioned that at my home, the heat is never turned on (I sweat easily and prefer the cold), so I rely on my jumpers to stay comfortable.

Like you, I often wear a cotton t-shirt as a base and a jumper as a mid-layer, but I am increasingly finding cotton to be an awful choice: it is not at all moisture-wicking. I just bought a couple of modal t-shirts to try out as a base layer, and for now I will use my 1-ply cashmere crewnecks as a base layer until they wear out, then it's time to move on to merino.

Regarding washing, I recently watched this video "Can you machine wash cashmere" from the YouTube channel "Nearly New Cashmere" and decided to stop babying my jumpers. For thin cashmere jumpers especially, once they've been worn 4 or 5 times (usually directly against the skin so they've absorbed sweat), I machine wash them bulk in a laundry mesh bag - cold wash, delicate cycle, shampoo - then lay flat to dry. Haven't noticed or experienced pilling, loss of shape or knit breakage from this method.

For drying or after wearing a knit, I leave it in direct sunlight for bit to kill bacteria and rid of body odors. It is supposed to help with killing moths as well - not sure how scientific this step is.

I reckon the whole ordeal about handwashing using specialty cashmere shampoo and pH neutral spring water, dry away from the sun to avoid UV damage, no perfume or cologne use, to be rather excessive. In the end, clothing is just clothing, it is meant to be worn. I think of cashmere as just like our hair, which we wash using shampoo and expose to the sun or scents. All of the babying of our treasured knits can be tiresome.
 

msimon

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Heating plays havoc with my skin during winter. We spent over 5 quid just yesterday on heating and electric, slow cooker was on all day as well. I allways say buy a wool jumper and shut up about being cold when I'm sat there enjoying my supreme warmth of the shawl cardigan.
 

Zc94

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Regarding washing, I recently watched this video "Can you machine wash cashmere" from the YouTube channel "Nearly New Cashmere" and decided to stop babying my jumpers. For thin cashmere jumpers especially, once they've been worn 4 or 5 times (usually directly against the skin so they've absorbed sweat), I machine wash them bulk in a laundry mesh bag - cold wash, delicate cycle, shampoo - then lay flat to dry. Haven't noticed or experienced pilling, loss
@happydayz1 & @Zc94, thank you for your input. I was curious about the moisture/sweat-wicking properties of merino wool compared to cashmere. It seems merino is the best option when it comes to this feature: outdoor wear brands use it religiously for hiking, for instance.



Zc, I completely agree - modern buildings are over-heated. In a previous post I mentioned that at my home, the heat is never turned on (I sweat easily and prefer the cold), so I rely on my jumpers to stay comfortable.

Like you, I often wear a cotton t-shirt as a base and a jumper as a mid-layer, but I am increasingly finding cotton to be an awful choice: it is not at all moisture-wicking. I just bought a couple of modal t-shirts to try out as a base layer, and for now I will use my 1-ply cashmere crewnecks as a base layer until they wear out, then it's time to move on to merino.

Regarding washing, I recently watched this video "Can you machine wash cashmere" from the YouTube channel "Nearly New Cashmere" and decided to stop babying my jumpers. For thin cashmere jumpers especially, once they've been worn 4 or 5 times (usually directly against the skin so they've absorbed sweat), I machine wash them bulk in a laundry mesh bag - cold wash, delicate cycle, shampoo - then lay flat to dry. Haven't noticed or experienced pilling, loss of shape or knit breakage from this method.

For drying or after wearing a knit, I leave it in direct sunlight for bit to kill bacteria and rid of body odors. It is supposed to help with killing moths as well - not sure how scientific this step is.

I reckon the whole ordeal about handwashing using specialty cashmere shampoo and pH neutral spring water, dry away from the sun to avoid UV damage, no perfume or cologne use, to be rather excessive. In the end, clothing is just clothing, it is meant to be worn. I think of cashmere as just like our hair, which we wash using shampoo and expose to the sun or scents. All of the babying of our treasured knits can be tiresome.

In that case I would also say merino is the best option.

Many athletic wear and outdoor brands have their most expensive versions of t shirts and sweatshirts with some % of merino in it, for that matter I think.
 

Bespoke DJP

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Similarly, are you suggesting that LP- and Zegna-branded jumpers uses the best materials for their own house, and supplies the rest (yarn or fabric of inferior quality) to tailors and other brands?
I am literally saying that they process different qualities based on customer specifications


Dear Gentlemen,

Since you've cited those two groups, let me offer you something that it was posted in a different way some time ago in another Thread of this Forum:

My cloth merchants in Greece are the official representatives of the above two Italian groups for Greece as far as their respective fabric divisions are concerned. Having a longer-term relationship with the Zegna group, the representative himself makes regular monthly visits to the lanificio in trivero to discuss various issues, and also to buy cloth that may be available for sale. The provenance of certain fabrics may be from the RTW line including the top-shelf articles, therefore I just cannot call them "leftovers". These fabrics were never offered to the "external" tailors as the group wanted to keep its clientele segregated; I find it correct as the Zegna boutiques have their own bespoke program, so by definition the customer has to have a choice among exclusive-to-the-program fabrics, and not ones that everyone has access to via his tailor.

FWIW, he once find only one trouser's length from the above-mentioned program, perhaps a bolt-end which measures 1.25m and - as such - it was not considered proper to be offered as a fabric choice to clients. It is part of my unfunded liabilities, it is an ultra lightweight flannel at 180glm and its composition is 92%cashmere, 8%silk; this did never, ever appear in any bunch, seasonal collection (Anteprima) or other fabrics' book offered to tailors around the globe. Certainly, other fabrics were excellent choices as well, albeit different, c'est tout!


Best,

Dimitris
 
Last edited:

msimon

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In that case I would also say merino is the best option.

Many athletic wear and outdoor brands have their most expensive versions of t shirts and sweatshirts with some % of merino in it, for that matter I think.
Finally sat down now and can give my answer.

I have worn merino during summer and was surprised by the amount of moisture it can absorb. I have washed merino in the washing machine with no detrimental effects to the jumper, merino is just less fussy unlike other wools but still handwash my other pieces once a year like the cardigans and roll necks as washing every 4 to 5 days is silly.
 

Bespoke DJP

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Is this a lighter shade of grey of the flannel? Being new to WL affairs, I have never seen this shade until now. Either a Black Friday insta-kop or not, it is great my friend, and at the same time different in many aspects from your Dalmo; enjoy it in health!

May we have measurements please?


Cheers,

Dimitris
 

fabricateurialist

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Is this a lighter shade of grey of the flannel? Being new to WL affairs, I have never seen this shade until now. Either a Black Friday insta-kop or not, it is great my friend, and at the same time different in many aspects from your Dalmo; enjoy it in health!

May we have measurements please?


Cheers,

Dimitris

going out on a limb here and saying it is the one below

also, computational photography is evidently messing with fabric close-ups

 

HotDilf

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Certainly, other fabrics were excellent choices as well, albeit different, c'est tout!

If I understand correctly, essentially, the yarn or fabric LP or Zegna uses for their own products are of the same, consistent quality of those supplied to other brands?

Of course with some exceptions, I reckon LP keeps the supposedly trademarked baby cashmere for their own line to prevent any competition, although this doesn't stop other brands from offering similar products: James Perse baby cashmere, Quince baby cashmere, Colombo kid cashmere...
 

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