Career Quandary - Take and Wait?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by FtRoyalty, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. FtRoyalty

    FtRoyalty Senior member

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    I received an offer from a school in GA for the upcoming academic year (starts in August). Pros included higher salary (slightly, it is teaching after all), head coach and a better working enviornment than where I am currently.

    However, I have a final interview on Wednesday for a position in D.C. If offered, I would much prefer this position as I will have a much higher salary, the opportunity to diversify my resume, and not relocate ten hours away. This position is in the field of education, but I won't be teaching. Plus, this company will pay for grad school. Note: I applied to GMU but have not heard back yet.

    I don't want to drag my feet with the GA job and risk it slipping away, but I'd like to avoid committing and then backing out. I'll probably ask for the some time to "talk it over", but I can't be expected to hold out indefinitely. If I accept the GA job and later take the D.C. job, would I burn a bridge? My initial thought is accept the GA position and back out later if I get the DC job. Thoughts?
     


  2. dflyer7

    dflyer7 Member

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    If your "final" interview is on Wed. then I'll assume you have had more than one interview. If that is true, chances are good that you will be extended an offer from the DC job. Let the GA job contact know that there are some personal reasons why it may be difficult for you to make a decision before next week, and will that be a problem? If GA made an offer it means they like you. Also, they have probably spent a few months looking for you; they will probably wait another week. If they pressure you, maybe you go with your plan B, accept and then possibly decline. If they pressure you it may tell you something more about the GA job. If you have to execute plan B, they should at least understand that you tried to handle it in an ethical manner by asking for time. Ultimately you have to act in your own interests just as an employer acts in theirs.
     


  3. FtRoyalty

    FtRoyalty Senior member

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    The interview is actually about three hours long. I have to take an hour-long test in addition to meeting with four groups of people, one of whom is the hiring manager. I went through a phone screening with HR and a "30 minute interivew" with the hiring manager that lasted about 15 minutes before he said he would recommend that I come in.
     


  4. dflyer7

    dflyer7 Member

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    If the hiring manager is moving the process forward then it's probably just yours to lose.

    I'd say go for what you want while making a best effort to respect others.
     


  5. scientific

    scientific Senior member

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    of course the bridge will be burnt. who cares? do you think they would hesitate to fire you if needed? just delay accepting to the extent you can and make clear to the other interview afterwards that you need to know soon because you have other offers.
     


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