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Canvas in shirt collars

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Fashionslave, Oct 14, 2004.

  1. Fashionslave

    Fashionslave Senior member

    Messages:
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    Oct 4, 2004
    We all know the benefit of a canvas front constructed suit jacket,and I presume the same is desireable in shirt collars.Therefore,which manufacturers still use canvas in their shirt collars? Borrelli? Hilditch? Are there any less expensive brands that use canvas collar interlinings?
     
  2. banksmiranda

    banksmiranda Senior member

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    Sep 19, 2003
    High-quality shirt interlinings are generally 100% cotton, while high-quality suit interlinings(depending on the area of the suit) are made from various blends of wool, linen, cotton and horsehair. The only real variable in shirt interlinings is whether the interlining is fusible or non-fusible/sew-in. There are high-quality fusibles and non-fusibles. Fusibles will be somewhat easier to iron and always appear smooth, while non-fusibles may require somewhat more meticulous ironing.
     
  3. Fashionslave

    Fashionslave Senior member

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    Oct 4, 2004
    Yes,you're right-cotton-that's what I meant-of course there wouldn't be horsehair in a shirt collar...D-uh.Thanks,Banks.
     
  4. banksmiranda

    banksmiranda Senior member

    Messages:
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    Sep 19, 2003
    There are also the variables of weight and stiffness/softness. There are heavy, stiff interlinings, light, soft interlinings, heavy, soft interlinings, light, stiff interlinings etc. T&A, Hilditch and Charvet use non-fusible interlinings, while most Italian makers tend to use fusible interlinings. Lorenzini uses fusible interlinings for some shirts, non-fusible interlinings for other shirts.
     

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