• Hi, I am the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earns a commission for the forum and allows us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear.
  • This site contains affiliate links for which Styleforum may be compensated.
  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

    Styleforum is supported in part by commission earning affiliate links sitewide. Please support us by using them. You may learn more here.

Cancer Cure?

Charley

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Messages
2,605
Reaction score
6
Seems to be a legit study. Report in New Scientist.
Sure hope this one works out. Smoke Cigars without guilt maybe? Even in New York?

Cheap, safe drug kills most cancers

It sounds almost too good to be true: a cheap and simple drug that kills almost all cancers by switching off their "immortality". The drug, dichloroacetate (DCA), has already been used for years to treat rare metabolic disorders and so is known to be relatively safe.

It also has no patent, meaning it could be manufactured for a fraction of the cost of newly developed drugs.

Evangelos Michelakis of the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and his colleagues tested DCA on human cells cultured outside the body and found that it killed lung, breast and brain cancer cells, but not healthy cells. Tumours in rats deliberately infected with human cancer also shrank drastically when they were fed DCA-laced water for several weeks.
 

Stazy

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Messages
7,025
Reaction score
432
An excellent start to 2007!

Cancer runs on my mom's side of the family, so I'm happy to hear about this.
 

Stazy

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Messages
7,025
Reaction score
432
Originally Posted by whodini
At this point I'm sure cancer runs in everyone's family. My own included.

That may be true, but from what I know, no one on my dad's side has gotten cancer. Perhaps it is only a matter of time.
 

tiecollector

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2006
Messages
6,790
Reaction score
25
sounds quite nice if it works. I read last year that someone was trying to take nano tubes and inject them into cancer cells then run some radiation that will heat them up and kill the cancer DNA.
 

brimley

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2006
Messages
791
Reaction score
9
Unsurprisingly overstated article. Cancer cells evade apoptosis (programmed cell death) through a variety of means. While a mutation may stop the abnormal cell from signalling for cell death, which DCA supposedly treats, it may also change the cell in a way that it doesn't respond to the signals. Then you may run into a problem of switching on dormant, oxygen-starved cells, which could spark cell growth.

There are plenty of treatments that work in a mouse or a petri dish and have failed in clinical trials. Still, it could be a good therapy, perhaps in combination with antivascular drugs in development.

I'm not sure we'll ever find a cure for cancer. However, if we can develop a cheap, sensitive screening method for early detection, it should be very treatable.
 

Matt

ex-m@Triate
Joined
Jan 14, 2005
Messages
10,765
Reaction score
275
Ok I am a business man and a pragmatist, so of course I get it, but I do hate this:

These may have to be funded by charities, universities and governments: pharmaceutical companies are unlikely to pay because they can’t make money on unpatented medicines.
 

tiecollector

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2006
Messages
6,790
Reaction score
25
Originally Posted by nyf
Unsurprisingly overstated article. Cancer cells evade apoptosis (programmed cell death) through a variety of means. While a mutation may stop the abnormal cell from signalling for cell death, which DCA supposedly treats, it may also change the cell in a way that it doesn't respond to the signals. Then you may run into a problem of switching on dormant, oxygen-starved cells, which could spark cell growth.

There are plenty of treatments that work in a mouse or a petri dish and have failed in clinical trials. Still, it could be a good therapy, perhaps in combination with antivascular drugs in development.

I'm not sure we'll ever find a cure for cancer. However, if we can develop a cheap, sensitive screening method for early detection, it should be very treatable.


I'm skeptical too and would be surprised if it worked effectively in practice. I read studies all the time and they are always on the effects of a treatment on a one legged albino amazon dingo during heat 3 days after the vernal equinox. Until I see studies in vitro on humans I'll try not to get too excited.

In my estimation, finding a way to prevent cancer in the first place is the best cure.
 

Charley

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Messages
2,605
Reaction score
6
Possibly cancer will turn out to be as treatable as stomach ulcers.

I doubt that there will be something to really prevent it from occuring. The general increase in the incidence of cancer is attributed to people living longer. So that it is somewhat understood to be a "natural" happening when cells develope so many times. Finding a way to turn off the bad ones would be pretty remarkable.
 

johnapril

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
5,600
Reaction score
11
Originally Posted by tiecollector
Until I see studies in vitro on humans I'll try not to get too excited.
.


That's in vivo. And there's no reason to modify "on humans" with it.
 

Featured Sponsor

Do You Consider Sustainability When Purchasing Clothes?

  • Always - Sustainability is a top priority in all my clothing purchases.

  • Often - I frequently consider sustainability, but it isn't the main factor in my decisions.

  • Rarely - I seldom consider sustainability when purchasing clothes.

  • Never - Sustainability is not a factor I consider in my clothing choices.


Results are only viewable after voting.

Forum statistics

Threads
510,337
Messages
10,619,131
Members
225,210
Latest member
eddykenzo389
Top