Can someone please explain khakis?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by linux_pro, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    The ones I have (from 3 years ago) are all wool cavalry twill-very heavy with a pronounced twill. Full cut, deep pockets, too heavy to ever wrinkle, can't wear in spring or in fall. They were "limited edition" purchased from the website (but no longer shown as available on the website). The sport utilities will be much lighter, but I don't have experience with them. Good luck on your auction.
     


  2. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    McCollough wrote some pretty cool books besides those two as well, including a book about the Panama Canal and ones bout Barbarians in the ancient world. He's one of my favorite writers.
     


  3. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    Have you ever seen the bar tab for the delegates at that convention?

    I saw it once and it was amazing. They went through an ungodly amount of whiskey, brandy, wine and beer. I mean a mind-boggling amount.
     


  4. bryce330

    bryce330 Senior member

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    I like how this has thread has suddenly switched from khakis to the founding fathers, but I have to disagree with your characterizations of Franklin and Adams.

    I admire Franklin, but his most important accomplishments were his inventions and his writing on character and virtue, rather than his political views or accomplishments. Yes, he did negotiate a very important treaty with France, but most of his time in France was devoted to philandering and living it up.

    As for Adams, he didn't have Franklin's charisma and he could be a stubborn bastard but he certainly wasn't "stupid as hell." The characterization of him as anti-French is also inaccurate; although he didn't care for the extravagance of French society during the so-called "Age of Enlightenment", he certainly recognized the vital importance of an alliance with France.

    Also, he didn't volunteer to go to France because he thought Franklin was just partying and he "wouldn't shut up about it." He was appointed ambassador by Congress in place of Silas Dean, who had been recalled, and was hesitant to accept the commission because he didn't want to leave his family. When he got there he found that Franklin had indeed spent most of his time carousing and had not even been keeping records of how much was being spent.

    True, Adams' time in France was sort of a disaster, but let's not forget his numerous accomplishments. His diplomatic efforts in Amsterdam led to the Dutch recognizing American independence and the Dutch bankers extending credit to America. The Dutch alliance was every bit as important as the French alliance to the economic recovery of the country after the end of the war.

    Adams' writings and activities in the period leading up to the Revolution were also more important than Franklin's in shaping the political thinking of the time. He also gave the key speech in July of 1776, in response to John Dickinson's speech against independence, that moved Congress to vote in favor of independence.

    Finally, Payne is not typically considered one of the "founding fathers." The term is generally used to mean Washington, Hamilton, Jefferson, Madison, Adams, and Franklin. Adams was certainly more important than Payne and I would suspect he is also better known to most Americans.
     


  5. Alias

    Alias Senior member

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    Another cool thing about khakis is that they don't fade. Dark cotton trousers do. And khakis, by very nature of their color, tend to resist dirt a bit better than lighter-colored cotton trousers do.

    I'd go for Bill's, but the good doctor said they're kind of overpriced for what they are.

    ps. I'm more familiar with Samuel Adams than John Adams
     


  6. linux_pro

    linux_pro Senior member

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    I agree, Bryce. Touche. My statements were definitely overgeneralized.

    However, I definitely view Payne as one of the founding "minds" of America. The guy's writing, while being highly controversial (he was an avowed atheist) was absolutely central to many of the ideas put forward, for the first time in Western history, in American government - such as the distinct separation of church and state. He was the biggest proponent of completely secular government, and his arguments were influential enough to inspire the 1st Ammendment (that is a very long and highly debatable topic). Of course, he also inspired the Declaration of Independence and the Revolutionary War. Outside of America, and especially in France, he was seen as one of the great writers of the Age of Enlightenment.
     


  7. linux_pro

    linux_pro Senior member

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    BTW - I posted a pic taken about 15 minutes ago in the pictures section. As you can see, my style is more influenced by Victorian style, very formal. I see khakis as very boring and plain. If it doesn't have flair, I don't really care for it.

    Thank god I have the money to support my habits. If I ruin a pair of $300 wool trousers, I could really care less, I just buy another pair and if they don't fit right, I take them to my tailor (I just found a great one here in Seattle - Mario's, on 3rd and Stewart, wonderful Italian lady that really knows what she's doing). I'd rather waste $300 on a pair of trousers that look sharp, than some pair of khaki chinos or whatever, that look, IMHO, totally boring and middle class. F**k the burbs, and everyone who lives there. I live and love the city, baby, and khakis (and all that they stand for) is anathema to urban culture. I guess it's that little bit of punk rawk left in my blood that keeps me from ever donning a pair, although I doubt I will wear them even when I am 65.

    I like what Chuck has posted on his website - "Cary Grant never went business casual." Oh so true.
     


  8. linux_pro

    linux_pro Senior member

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    Stu - I would give my left... uhm... foot, to have just an hour with that group of guys. Can you imaging swilling beer with Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Madison and the rest? Hamilton and Jefferson arguing in the corner, calling each other names. I'd have to butt in and tell Hamilton he's on the right track, no offense to Jefferson, but uhm... the proof is in the pudding, babe.
     


  9. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Hamilton should have spent a little less time swilling beer and a little more time practicing his marksmanship though...
     


  10. Steve B.

    Steve B. Go Spurs Go

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    Rule Breaker...

    God is this making me itch to make political comments. Damned gag mmph mmmph.

    Of course we all like Truman, he was a haberdasherer before...
     


  11. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    black trousers to work
    Rule Breaker...
    damn straight... who needs rules [​IMG] <ducking>
     


  12. bryce330

    bryce330 Senior member

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    I don't think historical analysis would violate your self-imposed ban on political commentary...
     


  13. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    Your armed services used to wear them.

    Though I haven't been in Oz for a while, I remember them or variations on them being ubiquitous in Sydney and Melbourne.

    Now, maybe things have changed, and you being a young pup (I presume) will know best.
     


  14. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    This is the reason I like them. To me though, they are strictly informal. I like one or two bland elements in an ensemble. Wait, what am I talking about, I like all the elements bland.

    FYI: And I'm just a few years younger than you.
     


  15. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    Care to discuss the relative merits of the M1 v. m2?
     


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