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Can I steam iron a silk tie?

jmatt

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Can I freshen up a tie by using a steam iron on it? No pressure, and maybe not even any physical contact. I'm just wondering if steam will work GREAT on a silk tie, or would it kill the tie?

I know not to PRESS the tie. My iron will steam in the vertical position. I was thinking of just running the steam iron down the length of a hanging tie.

Good idea? Terrible idea?

Thanks.
 

thinman

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Recall reading on the forum that steam with no physical contact is the thing to do, but I have no first-hand experience.
 

EL72

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Originally Posted by jmatt
Can I freshen up a tie by using a steam iron on it? No pressure, and maybe not even any physical contact. I'm just wondering if steam will work GREAT on a silk tie, or would it kill the tie?

I know not to PRESS the tie. My iron will steam in the vertical position. I was thinking of just running the steam iron down the length of a hanging tie.

Good idea? Terrible idea?

Thanks.


If the tie is wrinkled then yes, steaming it is fine and won't hurt.
 

j

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There have been a few good threads on this (so you might do a search), but basically: put something (like a cheap cotton handkerchief) between the iron and tie so you don't accidentally get a water spot on the tie, place the tie facedown on the ironing board, and pump steam through the tie without putting any pressure on. This should take care of 95% of wrinkles.
 

jmatt

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Originally Posted by j
There have been a few good threads on this (so you might do a search), but basically: put something (like a cheap cotton handkerchief) between the iron and tie so you don't accidentally get a water spot on the tie, place the tie facedown on the ironing board, and pump steam through the tie without putting any pressure on. This should take care of 95% of wrinkles.
My bad for failure to do a search first. I wrongly assumed the search engine wouldn't search for 3 letter words (tie).
 

j

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Originally Posted by jmatt
My bad for failure to do a search first. I wrongly assumed the search engine wouldn't search for 3 letter words (tie).
No problem. Yes, I changed the minimum search length to 3 chars for just such an occasion.
 

Drinkwaters

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I WOULD BEWARE OF STEAMING! Most often, to much moisture enters the fabric and will cause greater harm to the overall look of the construction.
The method I use to remove wrinkles is to coil the tie from the small end and allow it to rest for a few days. You will be pleased with the outcome.
Additionally, Pressing neckwear is not a good idea, as it will remove the roll from the edges of the tie and your ties will be flat and lack any body.

Gary
 

le_presidente

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Hi folks, I am new here.
I found this forum searching Google for steam+iron+tie, and I must say, that I am glad I did!
My method is exactly the same as the resident Maynard G. Krebs fellow here.
I just thought maybe a steam ironing would be better?
I'll try the steam method on a couple of throw-away ties. Recently, I have wrinkled more and more ties, as I tighten the knot. This is because, I reckon, due to my ever shrinking neck (I am very lean, and might have hit the leanest neck ever, 14", at least for myself.).
The solution is to practice the Windsor knot, or an alternative to the usual method.
Wish me luck, and thanks for the great forum!
 

TheIdler

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Welcome, and good luck!

I'm not quite sure I understand, though: are you saying that because your neck is thinner, you have to make your tie knot tighter? I would be wary of over-tight knots, as they're not good for the tie and tend to look strained. If you're concerned about a skinny neck looking unbalanced against a fat knot, try skinnier ties, maybe, and definitely stay away from Windsors.
 

Roger

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Originally Posted by drink8648
I WOULD BEWARE OF STEAMING! Most often, to much moisture enters the fabric and will cause greater harm to the overall look of the construction.
The method I use to remove wrinkles is to coil the tie from the small end and allow it to rest for a few days. You will be pleased with the outcome.
Additionally, Pressing neckwear is not a good idea, as it will remove the roll from the edges of the tie and your ties will be flat and lack any body.

Gary

Gary, can you elaborate just a little on your technique? I'd heard of coiling and tried doing that with a tie that had become wrinkled because of being shipped in a padded envelope, with no success whatsover in removing the wrinkles. Do you coil it fairly tightly around a cylindrical object?
 

JamesT

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Originally Posted by Roger
Gary, can you elaborate just a little on your technique? I'd heard of coiling and tried doing that with a tie that had become wrinkled because of being shipped in a padded envelope, with no success whatsover in removing the wrinkles. Do you coil it fairly tightly around a cylindrical object?

Wrap it loosely around your hand and leave it on a desk.
 

nmoraitis

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Originally Posted by drink8648
I WOULD BEWARE OF STEAMING! Most often, to much moisture enters the fabric and will cause greater harm to the overall look of the construction.
The method I use to remove wrinkles is to coil the tie from the small end and allow it to rest for a few days. You will be pleased with the outcome.
Additionally, Pressing neckwear is not a good idea, as it will remove the roll from the edges of the tie and your ties will be flat and lack any body.

Gary


I don't mean any offence, but you don't know what you are talking about. By using the steaming technique, I am able to get rid of almost 100% of the creases on my ties. The iron should never touch the tie, but steaming it for a good five minutes or more and than padding the tie with your hand will remove even the most stubborn crease.

The sheen and the rolled edges of the tie look the exact same. I have used this technique on all sorts of ties (silk, wool, cashmere, cotton, and blends of wool and silk/cashmere and silk/silk and cotton) and all have come out looking perfect with absolutely no harm done to the tie.

While the coil technique you mention will get rid of some creases (i used to store a few ties this way), its effect will only be minimal.
 

le_presidente

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Originally Posted by TheIdler
Welcome, and good luck!

I'm not quite sure I understand, though: are you saying that because your neck is thinner, you have to make your tie knot tighter? I would be wary of over-tight knots, as they're not good for the tie and tend to look strained. If you're concerned about a skinny neck looking unbalanced against a fat knot, try skinnier ties, maybe, and definitely stay away from Windsors.


Well, I don't have a skinny neck, in proportion to my body and head, my neck is perfectly fine.
But are you saying one with a 14" neck should find skinnier ties? I don't like skinny ties and the ties I wear look fine on me, just that I have to tighten the knot, maybe because my tying method needs to be tweaked. Any favourite knot you prefer, TheIdeler? I appreciate your advice.
 

Roger

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Originally Posted by nmoraitis
I don't mean any offence, but you don't know what you are talking about.
Now that's offensive!
 

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