• I'm happy to introduce the Styleforum Happy Hour, our brand new podcast featuring lively discussion about menswear and the fashion industry. In the inaugural edition, a discussion of what's going on in retail today. Please check it out on the Journal. All episodes will be also be available soon on your favorite podcast platform.

  • Styleforum Gives - Holiday Charity Auction 8: Cuir de Russie card case from Equus Leather

    We are very proud to present this year's edition of the Styleforum Holiday Charity Auctions, this year in support of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Spokane (www.rmhcspokane.org). Each Auction lasts 24 hours. Please follow and bid on all the auctions.

    The 8th auction is for a Cuir de Russie card case from Equus Leather. Please bid often and generously here

    Fok and the Styleforum Team.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Call for a job interview?

Davidko19

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
2,411
Reaction score
5
Being recently laid off Im now on the job and need some advice:

Lets say you were a hiring manager and put a resume on Monster, careerbuilder, whatever, you probably got hundreds of replies. If someone did some basic detective work and called you on the phone and said "Hey, I saw your posting online and wanted to introduce myself and see when we can set up an interview" would this be overbearing or showing the proper initiative?

I dont want to call and piss anyone off, but I also dont want to be just another sheet of paper. *hoping* to get picked. Does anyone have any experience in doing this, either as a job seeker or as a hiring manager? If so, what did you say that made it sound smooth and not desperate?

Thanks!
 

jkennett

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
750
Reaction score
2
Originally Posted by Davidko19
Being recently laid off Im now on the job and need some advice: Lets say you were a hiring manager and put a resume on Monster, careerbuilder, whatever, you probably got hundreds of replies. If someone did some basic detective work and called you on the phone and said "Hey, I saw your posting online and wanted to introduce myself and see when we can set up an interview" would this be overbearing or showing the proper initiative? I dont want to call and piss anyone off, but I also dont want to be just another sheet of paper. *hoping* to get picked. Does anyone have any experience in doing this, either as a job seeker or as a hiring manager? If so, what did you say that made it sound smooth and not desperate? Thanks!
I would definitely call the appropriate person if you can find their name and number with some "detective work". That is unless it specifically states not to call about this position. Check out the book "What color is your parachute?" if you get a chance. The library might have a copy, and I found the statistics and advice to be quite helpful. And, I'm not one for "self-help" books. "Bolles explains every job search method we have heard of out there today (and even some we have not). He gives very eye-opening statistics about which methods are most effective and which are not. Do you know what the single most ineffective strategy for job searching is according to Bolles’ research? It is posting your resume on a job board like Monster or Career Builder. That is only effective 4%-10% of the time. How many of many people use this as their only technique and expect good results? Too many. Just understanding that fact and what techniques produce the best results will make this read invaluable. Here’s a suggestion. Get started on building your network and never stop. More on the networking buzz word once you read through the book." -ripped from some random blog. (http://www.tech.horizonsoftech.com/?page_id=53)
 

Davidko19

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
2,411
Reaction score
5
Just went across the street to the library to get that book. Ill read it this weekend. Anyone else have insights? I dont want to look like a pest if I keep calling.

Also, what is a good script to use when talking with them?
 

globetrotter

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
20,607
Reaction score
400
Originally Posted by Davidko19
Just went across the street to the library to get that book. Ill read it this weekend. Anyone else have insights? I dont want to look like a pest if I keep calling.

Also, what is a good script to use when talking with them?


good luck.

what you want is to be able to show why you would be able to bring benifits to the company and the hiring manager. frankly, I have tried this several times without success, it really isn't easy.

good luck
 

Davidko19

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
2,411
Reaction score
5
anyone else?
 

justsayno

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2008
Messages
1,823
Reaction score
94
Assuming that you have the Hiring manager's number. Don't ask for an interview in the conversation. Instead, call and then ask about the position. Show interest by asking the right questions (after research). Maybe the hiring manager will be impressed by your initiative and then he will offer you an interview.
 

bmulford

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
2,994
Reaction score
24
Originally Posted by jkennett

Check out the book "What color is your parachute?" if you get a chance. The library might have a copy, and I found the statistics and advice to be quite helpful. And, I'm not one for "self-help" books.


Get the book. job boards/etc are for filtering people out - if you target the companies you're interested in, and contact the person you'd be working for you'll stand a much greater chance of getting an interview.

Calling them out of the blue will be hard the first few times but you'll get over your fear after a while. Or you can direct emails / letters directly to the person instead of calling.
 

forsbergacct2000

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
807
Reaction score
3
'when I'm hiring, especially during employment slumps, I use blind ads so I don't get those calls.

Hiring managers have a lot of responsibilities besides hiring the person. No unexpected phone call is a really good thing usually (unless it involves a sale.) You can really irritate me, anyways, if you interrupt me when I'm working on something else. Besides, it's probably best not to look to desparate.

That's just me, I guess, for what it's worth. Others may think differently.
 

binge

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2008
Messages
5,210
Reaction score
148
To the OP,

What industry are you in? What level position are you targeting? What size companies are you targeting? Etc.

With more specific info, you can get more specific advice.
 

Bradford

Current Events Moderator
Joined
Mar 19, 2002
Messages
6,714
Reaction score
163
Have you considered checking out LinkedIn to see if you have any sort of connection to the hiring manager?

That way, you can get your resume passed to them by someone who can say good things about you - or at least by a friend of a friend.
 

Davidko19

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
2,411
Reaction score
5
Originally Posted by forsbergacct2000
'when I'm hiring, especially during employment slumps, I use blind ads so I don't get those calls.

Hiring managers have a lot of responsibilities besides hiring the person. No unexpected phone call is a really good thing usually (unless it involves a sale.) You can really irritate me, anyways, if you interrupt me when I'm working on something else. Besides, it's probably best not to look to desparate.

That's just me, I guess, for what it's worth. Others may think differently.


This is what I was afraid of. If I was busy Id be pretty annoyed to get a call. Then again Ive never been on that side of hiring, so who knows?


What industry are you in? What level position are you targeting? What size companies are you targeting? Etc.

With more specific info, you can get more specific advice.
Ive been working in marketing. So I was looking for a marketing coordinator/manager position. Ive been targeting fortune 500 companies in the Los Angeles area - southbay/long beach to be exact. I dont want to kill myself driving up to downtown everyday. Eventually Ill expand my search further. I dont want to work at small time places anymore. I want stock options!



Have you considered checking out LinkedIn to see if you have any sort of connection to the hiring manager?
Just got on there but havent fooled around on it much. Want to be my friend?
 

dtmt

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2006
Messages
2,323
Reaction score
43
I've been involved in hiring, having to search through resumes and decide which candidates to call up for an interviews, etc.

It would have to be a pretty tiny company if you're able to find the hiring manager's contact info as an external candidate. At my company (and probably most others), at most you might be able to contact someone in recruiting/HR, and even then probably no one on the actual team you are applying for would have any idea that you called.

If I were the hiring manager and you somehow managed to get through to me it wouldn't have any negative effects as long as you weren't obnoxious. I would write down your name so I could remember the conversation just in case we did end up interviewing you, but I would ignore it when selecting resumes.
 

Joffrey

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Jun 18, 2006
Messages
12,052
Reaction score
867
Originally Posted by Davidko19
Being recently laid off Im now on the job and need some advice:

Lets say you were a hiring manager and put a resume on Monster, careerbuilder, whatever, you probably got hundreds of replies. If someone did some basic detective work and called you on the phone and said "Hey, I saw your posting online and wanted to introduce myself and see when we can set up an interview" would this be overbearing or showing the proper initiative?

I dont want to call and piss anyone off, but I also dont want to be just another sheet of paper. *hoping* to get picked. Does anyone have any experience in doing this, either as a job seeker or as a hiring manager? If so, what did you say that made it sound smooth and not desperate?

Thanks!


The best would be to send a direct (as in to their particular email address and not some generic [email protected] address) email following up with the hiring manager. Reiterate the date you sent the initial application, reiterate your interests and say if you don't hear anything within a certain date (let's say a week) you will call them. Don't forget to re-attach your resume.

The company ought to be impressed with your perseverance and should respond favorably if they are impressed with your credentials.

However, don't be surprised if it still doesn't work. But it's not a bad way to try to follow up on resumes you send out (plus most applicants won't go to such lengths).
 

Davidko19

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
2,411
Reaction score
5
Originally Posted by Jodum5
The best would be to send a direct (as in to their particular email address and not some generic [email protected] address) email following up with the hiring manager. Reiterate the date you sent the initial application, reiterate your interests and say if you don't hear anything within a certain date (let's say a week) you will call them. Don't forget to re-attach your resume.

The company ought to be impressed with your perseverance and should respond favorably if they are impressed with your credentials.

However, don't be surprised if it still doesn't work. But it's not a bad way to try to follow up on resumes you send out (plus most applicants won't go to such lengths).


I hae been doing this lately. Most companies however wont hand out the hiring managers email address so Ive had to do some sleuthing to figure it out.

What would you think if I also sent a hard copy directly to the hiring manager by mail with a nice letter saying, "I emailed you last monday but never heard back...I wanted to make sure this went directly into your hands" etc. Is that too much/too old fashioned or just a waste of time? Would a phone call as a follow up be better than impersonal resumes?
 

mikeber

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2005
Messages
228
Reaction score
1
Originally Posted by Davidko19
I hae been doing this lately. Most companies however wont hand out the hiring managers email address so Ive had to do some sleuthing to figure it out.

What would you think if I also sent a hard copy directly to the hiring manager by mail with a nice letter saying, "I emailed you last monday but never heard back...I wanted to make sure this went directly into your hands" etc. Is that too much/too old fashioned or just a waste of time? Would a phone call as a follow up be better than impersonal resumes?


You can try this approach and it could work. 20 or 30 years ago, this would had definitely give you an edge, and in most cases a response letter. Today, in most cases, the hiring manager would forward the letter to HR for further processing, and you will end up at square one.

As the current atmosphere in corporate America is like on the verge of a nervous breakdown, most advice on "how to" about job searches does not work. Try sending e-mails, letters, sometimes even call, but first ask the manager if that is a good time to talk, before you start telling him your life story.
And don't assume anything. The fact that someone is nice to you on the phone does not mean you got an interview, neither when someone is rude. Rude by the way, is the norm, so don't get discouraged.

Another approach that sometimes worked in the past was showing up dressed neatly and asking to see the HR or the hiring manager and handing them an envelope with your resume. Forget about it today. Most lobbies are empty without a front desk.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

How many pairs of shoes do you own?

  • 1 - 4

    Votes: 30 3.6%
  • 5 - 10

    Votes: 143 17.3%
  • 11 - 20

    Votes: 272 32.9%
  • 21 - 30

    Votes: 130 15.7%
  • 31 - 40

    Votes: 71 8.6%
  • 41 - 50

    Votes: 49 5.9%
  • 51 - 60

    Votes: 25 3.0%
  • 61 - 70

    Votes: 22 2.7%
  • 71 - 80

    Votes: 17 2.1%
  • 81 - 90

    Votes: 7 0.8%
  • 91 - 100

    Votes: 9 1.1%
  • 100+

    Votes: 53 6.4%

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
429,128
Messages
9,229,594
Members
193,741
Latest member
peaureame
Top