Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by HansderHund, Jul 27, 2012.

  1. PJShep

    PJShep Active Member

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    I agree. I don't sell on ebay much but I do on Craigslist. So I know the challenges of being a seller with people asking stupid questions and/or not reading the posting. I don't think I was angry with the seller,,,but definitely frustrated...especially after her ignoring me for 4 days because she was "away". But I really wanted the item and tried to "play nice", not very successfully, apparently. And, no, none of the questions I asked were answered in the description. I suppose I could have "asked" for the shipping method rather than "telling".
     
  2. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Senior member

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    Concerning the shipping method, buyers will sometimes make demands about shipping method and declared value. Both of those things affect the amount of risk for the seller. If the package gets lost, stolen, or even delivered but the buyer says he did not get it, then it is the seller who has a problem. Seller's risk = seller's decision.
     
  3. PJShep

    PJShep Active Member

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    Makes sense. However, I didn't mention the part where she replied to my request (or demand or whatever you want to call it) about shipping and she said she would ship any way I wanted. This is the thing...everything seemed to be running smoothly once she finally replied...and then bam! No soup for you!
     
  4. Fueco

    Fueco Senior member

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  5. Evil Abed

    Evil Abed Senior member

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    Looks like I'll be shipping out this corduroy jacket pretty soon... Any pointers on avoiding creasing/screwing up the cords when packing into a box? I usually fold sport coats inside out (note, not with the arms inside out... I think you get it) and then fold over and wrap in a dry-cleaner plastic cover before placing it in the box.
     
  6. k4lnamja

    k4lnamja Senior member

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    THIS. Got a NWT Isaia blue corduroy suit I want to package but don't know how
     
  7. HansderHund

    HansderHund Senior member

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    This is really solid advice everyone should read.
     
  8. dreamspace

    dreamspace Senior member

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    Would it really be low-balling if you know what the seller paid for the item he's selling?

    Sometimes you see various buyers snag up items at one-tenth of their selling price, and still get fired up when someone bids 2-3 times of what they actually paid, scoffing it off as a "ridiculous low-balling".

    Not sure if the bidder is low-balling, or the seller is asking too much/greedy.
    (This is probably a sore spot for the guys that base their Ebay shops on thrift-shop items...)
     
  9. HansderHund

    HansderHund Senior member

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    Yes, that's still low-balling. Don't take the price that the seller paid into consideration into your decision on what an item is actually worth. No one looks at major department stores and makes a decision on what they will pay based on the store's cost.

    Make your decision on what the item is worth to you. If you're asking significantly below market value for no reason other than your speculation on the seller's profit margin, you're low-balling.

    If I have a new item listed at €400, the market says that the item sells reliably at €390-410 and someone offers me €200, they're low-balling. While I do respond to messages with offers even though I don't use the "best offer" option, I don't really take these people serious. I normally respond with something like "My prices are firm, but thanks for your offer." If I'm willing to accept a lower price to move something, I'm upfront about it and say "I can't go to €200, but I can do a firm €380 with free shipping."
     
  10. Fueco

    Fueco Senior member

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    What I paid for an item has no bearing whatsoever on what I will sell it for. I generally go off what other similar items have sold for and are currently going for. If there's nothing else like it on the market, I aim high and see if I get nibbles (I have a 1940s suit coat that I really have no idea what it's worth -it's priced high and collecting watchers).

    The market doesn't care whether I paid $5 or $15 or $200 for a shirt, the market is dictated by what people are paying.

    Like Hansderhund (it took me forever to notice the dog in the name!) said above, people don't go into a department store and base your buying price on the cost they paid for the shirt!

    That being said, I do occasionally entertain offers that are unsolicited. But only if they are politely worded. Let's say I have a Patagonia Snap-T listed for $75 (true story!), a potential buyer writing, "i have $40 for the jacket" will get nowhere with me. Writing "I really like this Snap-T, and I love the color, but I feel the price is a bit high given current market prices. Would you take $50?" will likely get a response from me saying, "I understand what you're coming from. Check back in a couple of weeks... If the jacket hasn't sold by then, I might be willing to negotiate the price then."
     
  11. k4lnamja

    k4lnamja Senior member

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    EXACTLY! This is why I DO NOT deal with people on here in terms of B&S or the t/c thread. I only deal with certain people because people mainly on SF constantly undervalues an item b/c of 1. high supply of the item or 2. knowing what the other person paid (less than normal)

    It's like, if someone bought a car from a friend for $1K but the car is worth $5K and you decided to trade it in then would you trade in your $5K car for a $1K one b/c that's what you paid?

    Anyways, #rantover
     
  12. k4lnamja

    k4lnamja Senior member

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    Steve, I agree with everything you've written. :nodding: YOU and I can def. do business together.
     
  13. HansderHund

    HansderHund Senior member

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    Ha, yes, "Hans the dog" is a bit lost in my name.


    Agree completely. I've never quite understood the logic of basing my price on someone else's cost. I feel the same way when someone balks at the price of a mass-produced object and says "€300 for a pair of glasses?! It probably only cost them €XXX to make!" I always ask "Oh, what's it cost you to make a pair of glasses?"


    +1!
     
  14. dreamspace

    dreamspace Senior member

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    I think used clothes are a very difficult area to calculate, mainly because the price variance is very large. You can for example see the same suits routinely go for 150$ and 600$ on ebay, difference is that when they go for 100$ they move very fast, and when they go for 600$ they can be listed for many, many months.

    Should the buyer (or seller for that matter) use the high priced, slow selling items as basis for "average market price", or should he take both into account? I know many ebay flippers will always use the former, no mater what kind of items are being sold.

    Low-balling is also very relative: I regularly follow around 8-10 sellers that all sell the same type of items(at high speeds), at MUCH lower prices than their counterpart. Difference is that the items usually don't last long enough to be properly "seen" on ebay main pages, and thus people don't seem to base the average price on those. (Again, a lot of sellers have a funny way of making average price based on items that hang around for a long time on Ebay)
     
  15. txwoodworker

    txwoodworker Senior member

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    Arrrgh CHARGEBACK! On an item sold almost a month ago, received and positive feedback left on the 11th. The person has disputed the charge through their CC. Anyone had to deal with it, what was your outcome? It was on my largest single item sale to date, I'm so pissed right now. No communication from eBay, just the chargeback on PayPal. Funny thing, if the GD thing fit me, I would have never sold it! AUCTION
    Someone here was bragging how they could get any buyer out of any charges for any reason in this thread a couple hundred pages ago, who was that and WTF!

    Edit- found the part of the thread, was from back in July. Couldn't find where I remember someone mentioning that they could get any seller out of paying for anything. Maybe I imagined that? Good to notice that the people that talked about having chargebacks, won the case. Hopefully that happens to me, anyone LOST a chargeback? I imagine with the lack of communication and with the item being shipped to Canada, it appears I also may never see the item again since the person is not requesting a return.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2013

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