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Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions

Sartoriamo

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Photography experts: I could use some advice about lighting. I have continued to "upgrade" my lighting (lol for some of you), but I'm not happy with it, as I think it may actually be too bright. This is largely because of the massive increases in power now available at low cost. After years of using fluorescents, I have been using the Harbor Freight LED shop lights, one above the mannequin, and one on each side, positioned vertically (actually hung from IV poles). Another hangs above the flat table. But they are super bright, and with 4 of them running, I have 20K lumens in the room, even though they do not produce much heat.

However, I recently sold a z-rack to a professional photographer who also designs fancy wedding dresses, and when I went to deliver it, I saw he had a setup from the rapidly growing Chinese brand, Neewer, that he said was super cheap and very good. He further said that the light was less harsh than I'd get from shop lights, especially since they came with soft boxes, and both the intensity and the color temperature could be adjusted to suit on each unit. He also claimed that the CRI was really good.

However, when I went to look online, it seemed like there were dozens of different options, and so I wonder whether any of you have experience with these? Or particular recommendations of which setups would best suit our particular activity? I know that quite a number of you have shown setups with strobes, which are big bucks and require a camera that will energize them, but I prefer fixed lighting. I don't consider myself a "photographer" – it's just something that comes along with flipping – although I like to try for the best images I can muster. I use a Canon S120 P&S with manual control, but have become concerned that my images are less good than they were with fluorescent tubes and an older P&S. Any thoughts on the latest lighting kits? Thanks!
 

capnwes

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
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Photography experts: I could use some advice about lighting. I have continued to "upgrade" my lighting (lol for some of you), but I'm not happy with it, as I think it may actually be too bright. This is largely because of the massive increases in power now available at low cost. After years of using fluorescents, I have been using the Harbor Freight LED shop lights, one above the mannequin, and one on each side, positioned vertically (actually hung from IV poles). Another hangs above the flat table. But they are super bright, and with 4 of them running, I have 20K lumens in the room, even though they do not produce much heat.

However, I recently sold a z-rack to a professional photographer who also designs fancy wedding dresses, and when I went to deliver it, I saw he had a setup from the rapidly growing Chinese brand, Neewer, that he said was super cheap and very good. He further said that the light was less harsh than I'd get from shop lights, especially since they came with soft boxes, and both the intensity and the color temperature could be adjusted to suit on each unit. He also claimed that the CRI was really good.

However, when I went to look online, it seemed like there were dozens of different options, and so I wonder whether any of you have experience with these? Or particular recommendations of which setups would best suit our particular activity? I know that quite a number of you have shown setups with strobes, which are big bucks and require a camera that will energize them, but I prefer fixed lighting. I don't consider myself a "photographer" – it's just something that comes along with flipping – although I like to try for the best images I can muster. I use a Canon S120 P&S with manual control, but have become concerned that my images are less good than they were with fluorescent tubes and an older P&S. Any thoughts on the latest lighting kits? Thanks!
Not a photography expert, but I did work for a lighting designer at my last "real job". I'd venture to say it's an issue with the kelvin color of the shop lights. I don't see it shown on their spec sheet either. You would want to find something in the 5000K-5500K Range, for daylight rendering.

Also, what's your mounting distance on the shop lights? You could be too close. The 5000 lumens are probably measured at a mounting height of 5 or 6 feet above the work surface.
 
Last edited:

Fueco

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Not a photography expert, but I did work for a lighting designer at my last "real job". I'd venture to say it's an issue with the kelvin color of the shop lights. I don't see it shown on their spec sheet either. You would want to find something in the 5000K-5500K Range, for daylight rendering.
For sure. Swapping out the bulbs for daylight balanced ones would be worth a shot before buying a new setup.

@Sartoriamo

Could you post an example shot?
 

JackFlash

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Feb 22, 2012
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I did some lighting research recently to make a better videoconference setup for myself. This Neewer set is often recommended and likely what the person had.
 

goatamous II

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2020
Messages
174
Reaction score
431
Morality question
sold a pair of eyeglass frames
got a message from the buyer, basically saying "my optician said these are the worst condition they've ever seen. my 20 year old glasses are better than these. it's been a while since I've been burned on ebay"

[FWIW - i'm no expert, but they seemed fine to me. 🤷‍♂️ ]

I haven't responded to the message yet, but just noticed that the buyer gave me positive feedback
I offer returns, so the only possible outcome I can see occurring is that I take the item back and refund the buyer

Would any of you even engage at this point or just move on?
 

haloitsme

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2017
Messages
503
Reaction score
283
Photography experts: I could use some advice about lighting. I have continued to "upgrade" my lighting (lol for some of you), but I'm not happy with it, as I think it may actually be too bright. This is largely because of the massive increases in power now available at low cost. After years of using fluorescents, I have been using the Harbor Freight LED shop lights, one above the mannequin, and one on each side, positioned vertically (actually hung from IV poles). Another hangs above the flat table. But they are super bright, and with 4 of them running, I have 20K lumens in the room, even though they do not produce much heat.

However, I recently sold a z-rack to a professional photographer who also designs fancy wedding dresses, and when I went to deliver it, I saw he had a setup from the rapidly growing Chinese brand, Neewer, that he said was super cheap and very good. He further said that the light was less harsh than I'd get from shop lights, especially since they came with soft boxes, and both the intensity and the color temperature could be adjusted to suit on each unit. He also claimed that the CRI was really good.

However, when I went to look online, it seemed like there were dozens of different options, and so I wonder whether any of you have experience with these? Or particular recommendations of which setups would best suit our particular activity? I know that quite a number of you have shown setups with strobes, which are big bucks and require a camera that will energize them, but I prefer fixed lighting. I don't consider myself a "photographer" – it's just something that comes along with flipping – although I like to try for the best images I can muster. I use a Canon S120 P&S with manual control, but have become concerned that my images are less good than they were with fluorescent tubes and an older P&S. Any thoughts on the latest lighting kits? Thanks!
I would use strobes over continuous light everyday, you get much „sharper“ picture.
Regarding color and K does not matter, as you shoot in RAW and do the settings afterwords.
I did a job for a professional e-commerce agency only uses Styleshoots now. They used to have strobes the most power and massive softboxes in a massive room. They told me light needs space to fully wrap the items and make artistic content but also e-commerce standard content with ghost manequins.

Honestly it depends on budget, they used very expensive eq. One of their lenses const more than my setup.
 

haloitsme

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2017
Messages
503
Reaction score
283
Morality question
sold a pair of eyeglass frames
got a message from the buyer, basically saying "my optician said these are the worst condition they've ever seen. my 20 year old glasses are better than these. it's been a while since I've been burned on ebay"

[FWIW - i'm no expert, but they seemed fine to me. 🤷‍♂️ ]

I haven't responded to the message yet, but just noticed that the buyer gave me positive feedback
I offer returns, so the only possible outcome I can see occurring is that I take the item back and refund the buyer

Would any of you even engage at this point or just move on?
Depends on $$$.
If it’s low dollar item give him a partial store credit.
High ticket up to you.
 

div25sec9

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
902
Reaction score
767
Morality question
sold a pair of eyeglass frames
got a message from the buyer, basically saying "my optician said these are the worst condition they've ever seen. my 20 year old glasses are better than these. it's been a while since I've been burned on ebay"

[FWIW - i'm no expert, but they seemed fine to me. 🤷‍♂️ ]

I haven't responded to the message yet, but just noticed that the buyer gave me positive feedback
I offer returns, so the only possible outcome I can see occurring is that I take the item back and refund the buyer

Would any of you even engage at this point or just move on?
I would lean to just ignoring and moving on. You thought they were fine, and he thought they were great and left you positive feedback, so I think this is just a case of buyer's remorse. The idea that his optician discovered this unnoticed terrible condition is hard to believe. You will see from many instances on here where an un-named third-party expert supposedly weighs in.
 

notdos

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2015
Messages
365
Reaction score
475
Morality question
sold a pair of eyeglass frames
got a message from the buyer, basically saying "my optician said these are the worst condition they've ever seen. my 20 year old glasses are better than these. it's been a while since I've been burned on ebay"

[FWIW - i'm no expert, but they seemed fine to me. 🤷‍♂️ ]

I haven't responded to the message yet, but just noticed that the buyer gave me positive feedback
I offer returns, so the only possible outcome I can see occurring is that I take the item back and refund the buyer

Would any of you even engage at this point or just move on?
His optician just wants to sell him frames.
 

goatamous II

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2020
Messages
174
Reaction score
431
Thanks all
I was leaning that way but wanted to make sure I wasn't being a complete asshole (apparently i care?)
Happy Friday!
 

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