1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Business Administration Major--Useless?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Another New Yorker, May 14, 2011.

  1. kxk

    kxk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2011
    If you're than interested in a particular subject, find a syllabus online, read the same pages and write on the same paper topic. It's that easy to get a liberal arts education, and you don't have to waste time and money in classes. We all have 168 hours a week and you spend a hell of a lot of it sleeping and drinking, why spend it on something you can learn faster on your own?
    You could say something substantially similar for most college majors, including business. outside the fields where you need equipment/facilities, the substantive stuff can easily be learned on your own, and even through lectures of "famous" professors through the use of iTunes U or MIT's opencourseware (and I think a few other schools do something similar). If anything, liberal arts education is what should be taught in a college setting precisely because it's not about "What year did the WWI begin?" or the impact of using LIFO or FIFO in keeping track of your inventory. Shoot, even my public high school didn't teach history that way. The entire point of liberal arts education isn't to teach you the material, but rather the pursuit and the process--something that is abstract (and yes, in and of it self, useless) to a point that one does stand to benefit from dialogue and debate from professors and classmates.
    No, numbers and sciences aren't easy--and they do hire math and science majors for positions that actually require hard numbers and real science skills. On the other hand, most business positions require a lot less mathematical ability than some would have you believe. Even less important than ability, depth of understanding--at least the kind that requires one to fill his entire undergraduate curriculum with "business" classes.
     
  2. apocalypse later

    apocalypse later Senior member

    Messages:
    452
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    You could say something substantially similar for most college majors, including business. outside the fields where you need equipment/facilities, the substantive stuff can easily be learned on your own, and even through lectures of "famous" professors through the use of iTunes U or MIT's opencourseware (and I think a few other schools do something similar).

    If anything, liberal arts education is what should be taught in a college setting precisely because it's not about "What year did the WWI begin?" or the impact of using LIFO or FIFO in keeping track of your inventory. Shoot, even my public high school didn't teach history that way. The entire point of liberal arts education isn't to teach you the material, but rather the pursuit and the process--something that is abstract (and yes, in and of it self, useless) to a point that one does stand to benefit from dialogue and debate from professors and classmates.


    No, numbers and sciences aren't easy--and they do hire math and science majors for positions that actually require hard numbers and real science skills. On the other hand, most business positions require a lot less mathematical ability than some would have you believe. Even less important than ability, depth of understanding--at least the kind that requires one to fill his entire undergraduate curriculum with "business" classes.


    So you're saying the point of college then, is to engage in scholarly debate and dialogue and develop skills in that manner. Great--I'm on board, however I challenge you to find universities where most classes are structured in a manner such as this. I went to a halfway decent university (USNews ranked it in the top 50, anyways) and I would say only 1/3 of my liberal arts classes were structured this way. The rest were simply lecture, paper, test, lecture. My business classes inspired debates about ethics, social responsibility, and creative problem solving, where as my liberal arts classes rarely inspired anything beyond sleep from the other students.

    If this is the philosophy that provosts of universities stand by, they are doing a piss poor job. I will never forget my Philosophy of Ethics class when my prof would basically run through a series of 10 questions and we were supposed to debate them. Question asked, no hands raised, just bored looks on student faces. Uninspired. Sad, but participation is perceived as lame and talking in the back of the class is cool. Students come out of college learning how to cram for tests, how to conduct self-serving research for their crappy papers, and how to drink. Well, one of those important.

    Lastly, I acknowledge your point about about many business jobs not needing as much math as you think. I wasn't trying to prove the worth of a numbers-based degree as much as I was trying to disprove the worth of a liberal arts degree.
     
  3. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

    Messages:
    4,892
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Lastly, I acknowledge your point about about many business jobs not needing as much math as you think. I wasn't trying to prove the worth of a numbers-based degree as much as I was trying to disprove the worth of a liberal arts degree.

    Success in math classes is a pretty good proxy for brains and work ethic.
     
  4. Reggs

    Reggs Senior member

    Messages:
    5,531
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The Internet
    Success in math classes is a pretty good proxy for brains and work ethic.

    Social skills, sex life, and hygiene as well.
     
  5. Satorialist

    Satorialist Senior member

    Messages:
    154
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    <----- Bachelor of Business Administration here. From my first hand experience it is a toxic waste of a major to be avoided at all costs.

    The BA route made sense at the time because like so many others, early-on I absolutely knew I wanted to 'be in business' but without knowing precisely what type of business or role...

    It was a mistake.

    If I could turn back the clock and star over, a thought I have at least once a day, then I'd have selected a specialty degree such as Finance, it's all the rage now considering how much the US economy subsists of Finance sector jobs (the consensus among my posh circle of friends both then and now is you're either 'in Banking/Finance or a poor peon,' and with the high-moneyed dream jobs they have now, they were right); Economics, a major that gives a far superior understanding of business and how the world works than a BA ever will or could; or Engineering and Mathematics, both eminently respectable and useful. Each lends you levels of instant credibility and open doors that the BA absolutely does not or can not.

    Hell, even Psychology is a better degree, I think. Basically, ANY OTHER specialist degree is superior.

    The BA is a master-of-nothing degree. Literally. The moral of all this is: Specialize, specialize, specialize. Stay away from generalist degrees. The poster who earlier described the BA as meant for people who end up being the "manager at XYZ box store at the mall" and never end up doing anything else.... that's painting with a broad brush but is closer to reality than anyone cares to admit. That's how I view the BA degree. If you aspire to anything greater, you had better have a solid plan and have built a golden personal network (should have this anyway but doubly-true with BA degree).

    This will tell you everything you need to know; if choosing between two identical resumes, one having a Bachelor of Business Administration and the other Economics or Finance, which do you call back?

    The Bachelor of Business Administration sorely needs a complete overhaul in terms of purpose and curriculum in order to stay relevant, let alone competitive, vis-a-vis other business degrees because the BA teaches nothing of significance that isn't already common sense and isn't challenging in the least.
     
  6. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    <----- Bachelor of Business Administration here. From my first hand experience it is a toxic waste of a major to be avoided at all costs.

    The BA route made sense at the time because like so many others, early-on I absolutely knew I wanted to 'be in business' but without knowing precisely what type of business or role...

    It was a mistake.

    If I could turn back the clock and star over, a thought I have at least once a day, then I'd have selected a specialty degree such as Finance, it's all the rage now considering how much the US economy subsists of Finance sector jobs (the consensus among my posh circle of friends both then and now is you're either 'in Banking/Finance or a poor peon,' and with the high-moneyed dream jobs they have now, they were right); Economics, a major that gives a far superior understanding of business and how the world works than a BA ever will or could; or Engineering and Mathematics, both eminently respectable and useful. Each lends you levels of instant credibility and open doors that the BA absolutely does not or can not.

    Hell, even Psychology is a better degree, I think. Basically, ANY OTHER specialist degree is superior.

    The BA is a master-of-nothing degree. Literally. The moral of all this is: Specialize, specialize, specialize. Stay away from generalist degrees. The poster who earlier described the BA as meant for people who end up being the "manager at XYZ box store at the mall" and never end up doing anything else.... that's painting with a broad brush but is closer to reality than anyone cares to admit. That's how I view the BA degree. If you aspire to anything greater, you had better have a solid plan and have built a golden personal network (should have this anyway but doubly-true with BA degree).

    This will tell you everything you need to know; if choosing between two identical resumes, one having a Bachelor of Business Administration and the other Economics or Finance, which do you call back?

    The Bachelor of Business Administration sorely needs a complete overhaul in terms of purpose and curriculum in order to stay relevant, let alone competitive, vis-a-vis other business degrees because the BA teaches nothing of significance that isn't already common sense and isn't challenging in the least.


    It's funny how those who hang around these types of people are always miserable. If my entire life consisted of comparing my material success with my "friends" I'd probably be in constant agony as well.
     
  7. Satorialist

    Satorialist Senior member

    Messages:
    154
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    It's funny how those who hang around these types of people are always miserable. If my entire life consisted of comparing my material success with my "friends" I'd probably be in constant agony as well.
    Truly
    great men mustn't compare themselves to anyone at all, right Lord-Barrington? The "Keeping Up With the Jones's" syndrome is unhealthy to be sure, but who doesn't use their circle of friends as an anecdotal frame of reference from time to time?
     
  8. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Truly great men mustn't compare themselves to anyone at all, right Lord-Barrington?

    The "Keeping Up With the Jones's" syndrome is unhealthy to be sure, but who doesn't use their circle of friends as an anecdotal frame of reference from time to time?


    Everyone is tempted to which is why I try to keep people around me who are grounded and have diverse jobs and educational backgrounds. Hanging out with a bunch of young business analysts who are busy comparing bonuses sounds like pure hell.
     
  9. roybello

    roybello New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2014
    say if i wanna have my on photography business. by me studying this would it help me?
     
  10. i10casual

    i10casual Senior member

    Messages:
    721
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
    Texas
    No, it's too bloated for that. Maybe do something else. Then take an intro marketing course. You can read up on simple accounting for personal business and get a business plan tutor.
     
  11. i10casual

    i10casual Senior member

    Messages:
    721
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
    Texas
    I picked up a simple BA. Then I took electives that would help round out my understanding of things. I knew I might inherit my father's factory so I didn't specialize in anything, just partied. Bad move, I should have focused on an accounting MBA. I have a great accountant now and lawyer, two things that are a must for a business, but I think I could plan better if I knew more tax laws and things.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by