1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Bush wears a rented tux to Buckingham Palace

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by linux_pro, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. AlanC

    AlanC Senior member

    Messages:
    7,805
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Location:
    Heart of America
    I suspect this one. He's dead. [​IMG]
     
  2. uriahheep

    uriahheep Senior member

    Messages:
    265
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Horace: a Roman philosopher
     
  3. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,568
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    No. I think he just hates to dress up.
     
  4. Horace

    Horace Senior member

    Messages:
    1,447
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Yeah, I think Manton was citing me again. He gave me credit, so I cannot complain.
     
  5. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

    Messages:
    1,272
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    East Hampton & New York
    I think not. Might it not be that Texas rules eschew Savile Row in favor of Rodeo Drive and bows in favor of bolos? Perhaps, in the rules of local custom, chaps win out over spats and ten gallons top hats? Would not a base of Crawford rather than Oxford Spur one to consider the style mandates of a different world? IMHO, the Point Collar of Preferred Pique is handily trumped by the Shining Silver of a Collar's Traditional Tips.

    Answers in advance ... because some of we workaday folk have to actually leave the computer to earn our pittances:

    Manton: I know:The Rules are universal and location is unimportant. Perhaps the tenet of the cited article, that the world's most powerful person has the juice to bend 'em a bit, extends all the way to tumbleweed town? In any event, arguing style with a man and his gun rack is usually a losing proposition.

    Carlo: Don't you go stickin' in none of your Jersey transplant "can't believe what they wear down here" stuff.

    JCusey: Whether Lobbs or Leddys, new leather still smells better than weed fuzz.

    RJMan: Allow the postulating prosaicist a bit of latitude with your espousal of elegant English?

    Y'all Giddyiap, Now.
     
  6. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,568
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    Simple: breeches are for riding, which indicates that the wearer owns a country estate and has sufficient income to keep a stable.  Brummell's father was a successful shopkeeper, and left the Beau a few thousand pounds.  This was enough to allow Brummell a nice life in London, until he gambled it away.  But it was not enough -- not nearly enough -- to maintain the kind of country house life of the aristocracy.  So Brummell changed the rules.  He "citified" his look.  The point was to eliminate the horsy status symbols that the upper class wore in town, and make everyone look largely the same.

    Well, you have to allow a writer a little poetic license.
     
  7. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

    Messages:
    1,272
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    East Hampton & New York
    Yeah. It's all you poets that cause 15 guys per year to walk into my studio expecting to walk out looking like Cary Grant. Damn poetic license.
     
  8. RJman

    RJman Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    18,647
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2004
    Location:
    In the not too distant future
    I was present at his funeral procession and was shocked at the public's complete ignorance -- to the point of offensiveness -- of basic respect for the dead. While some on this board may have guessed I did not share the late Gipper's politics I can at least respect the event. The American Jackass throngs in baseball caps -- which they never took off as the cortege passed -- who applauded the casket as if they were glad he was dead -- may have felt grief but they sure as hell could have fooled me by their behavior.

    The tailcoat issue may be another message from certain parties that protocol is for the indolent or the pedantic. However, I submit that a state memorial ceremony for a former leader deserves a certain maintenance of basic formulas of protocol.
     
  9. Etruscan

    Etruscan Senior member

    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    Boston
    Excellent article, Manton. Much as I hate to imagine their thought processes, I think even the non-clothes obsessed would find it a fascinating treatment.
     
  10. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

    Messages:
    8,602
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Uriahheep: "Horace: a Roman philosopher"[sic]. He was a POET, DAMMIT, A POET.... Time was when every educated gentleman could be expected to be intimately familiar with Horace (in the original, of course) and quote him appropriately. In many respects, that was a beter time.
     
  11. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

    Messages:
    1,272
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    East Hampton & New York
    Our view - and by our I mean SF members - is a sheltered, clouded one when it comes to that huge "rest of the world". Your outrage is justified - and would be widely supported among those of a more genteel, mannered upbringing.
    Viewed from another point-of-view, the fact that some knew not to remove their caps was far, far outweighed by the strength, the unmatched force, of "We The People"'s eulogy. Neither politics nor religion, neither rich nor poor, neither sartorially wise nor plumber's butt ... kept the people from paying their respects. The applause you attribute as being to the casket was, in my opinion, applause for the man who in the eyes of so many ended the Cold War, thus removing the fear of nuclear holocaust.
    I wholeheartedly agree that etiquette had an awful, disgusting day. I completely - and respectfully - disagree that respect suffered the same fate.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by