Built an exotic hardwood nightstand

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by SkinnyGoomba, Jun 13, 2009.

  1. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,643
    Likes Received:
    1,709
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    This is my first real 'woodworking' project, i had some exotic hardwoods laying around from my days of building knives as a hobby. Built from Macassar and Gaboon ebony, Honduras Rosewood, Brazilian Kingwood and Cherry (just the dowels). All solid hardwood, everything is 3/4, 4/4 or 8/4 sawn. All of the joints are sliding dovetails. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] The finish is Linseed oil and Paste wax, and part of my idea was to build the entire thing out of natural materials, only thing man made is the glue used on the joints and dowels. [​IMG] Pic of the drawer right before it was finished. Only thing left to do is add some sort of knob on the drawer.
     


  2. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

    Messages:
    19,407
    Likes Received:
    3,871
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    looks damn nice, I love the legs on that thing. Beautiful wood. How is the Honduras Rosewood? I'm only familiar with the magnificent Brazilian and the much more common Indian Rosewood.



    also, where did you land the ebony? I'm looking for a big piece to make a coffee table.
     


  3. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,643
    Likes Received:
    1,709
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    Willard Bros in Trenton NJ has them, that being said recent prices on Gaboon and Macassar are pretty expensive ($100 bd/ft in 8/4) They usually have the gaboon and macassar cut down to about 2 or 3 ft lengths, since from what i understand the harvesters backpack this stuff to the wood mills in africa. The Hondo is great, its hell to cut and when planing take very small cuts, but it comes out nice when finishing. I finish everything by hand, with nothing more then a block and sandpaper, i take it down to 1000 grt, then finish with 0000 steel wool, wipe it down then linseed. Nice tight grain, and really comes out smooth, less expensive then Brazilian Rosewood. If you get a chance to check out the showroom over there, i think you'll be pretty impressed, I'm sure they have Padauk slabs (might want to call ahead on that one) and I've seen a bunch of Walnut slabs. I think for the next project i'm going to switch to Tung oil, as my guy at Willard Bros warned me that the linseed oil is dangerous. Thanks for the compliments. http://www.willardbrothers.net/
     


  4. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    20,840
    Likes Received:
    2,053
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    I'm impressed that you are able to make things like this. Obviously, the style is not to my taste, but I'm curious: what was the reasoning behind making it so thick and heavy looking? Did you do it for durability's sake or to get a certain look? Is it easier or harder to make something more streamlined and low-profile?
     


  5. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    16,118
    Likes Received:
    1,088
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Location:
    Tombstone
    Is it easier or harder to make something more streamlined and low-profile?

    Both, really. Beginning woodworkers typically start with blocky, simple shapes, usually in fairly thick wood. But it gets more complicated as you go from there, whether you go for thick and heavy or for sleek and minimalist.

    Nice work, Skinny. Looks like you did a great job on the finishing.
     


  6. Pariolino

    Pariolino Senior member

    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Looks like crap, really.
     


  7. radicaldog

    radicaldog Senior member

    Messages:
    2,638
    Likes Received:
    43
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Good craftmanship, and the texture on some of the woods is quite attractive. The overall result is not to my taste, but why should you care. It's certainly quite a unique piece.
     


  8. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,643
    Likes Received:
    1,709
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    I'm impressed that you are able to make things like this. Obviously, the style is not to my taste, but I'm curious: what was the reasoning behind making it so thick and heavy looking? Did you do it for durability's sake or to get a certain look? Is it easier or harder to make something more streamlined and low-profile?
    Thanks foof, Obviously I designed it for myself, working around what I had on hand, so the design takes that into consideration. The heft of it, for a few reasons: I like heavier furniture primarily, for functionality and durability reasons i like heftier pieces. One of my goals was to have a drawer that slides in/out nicely without much side to side movement, i accomplished that. The legs, skirts, and Top were sized according to what i felt was appropriate. I had originally planned to use a thinner skirt, but in the end it would up being a bit too light/small looking.
     


  9. tiecollector

    tiecollector Senior member

    Messages:
    7,031
    Likes Received:
    11
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Location:
    Germany
    I rather like the style, looks mid-century to me. I think it would function better as a couch end table than a night stand.

    Since renovating my house I've started buying contractor grade equipment and I'd like to see your shop.
     


  10. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,643
    Likes Received:
    1,709
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    I'll take a shot of the shop tomorrow, and post it up. I grew up metalworking, so i have a metal working shop primarily with a few woodworking tools.

    I did the Sliding doves, dowels and M&T's in a Bridgeport Milling machine w/ DRO that I've adapted for woodworking.
     


  11. dl20

    dl20 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,298
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    The execution looks pretty good but the design and material choice is random. The piece is to clunky and there is to much going on. You could probably remake the piece with the same stock and slim the proportions down a bit. I would have also waited on using such expensive materials. Perhaps until your second piece?

    I rarely use macassar stock. If i'm not making draw pulls or small details I resaw it for veneer. That leg stock would have made some nice panels as well. what made you mill it down for legs?

    dl
     


  12. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,643
    Likes Received:
    1,709
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    Veneer.....No thanks.

    Other than that, sure I'll work on the design aspects of the next project, but this is done/finished and left for nothing more then opinions and use.

    Next project, Black Walnut bed, which this will find a nice home next to.
     


  13. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

    Messages:
    32,350
    Likes Received:
    153
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Looks like great craftsmanship. Congrats!

    My brother just built a fabulous wine cellar and used coca bola wood for the table/shelf. Looks superb.
     


  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,643
    Likes Received:
    1,709
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    Thanks AF,

    Cocobolo is an awesome wood, i love the stuff.
     


  15. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

    Messages:
    27,312
    Likes Received:
    1,617
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Location:
    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    Impressive work. I agree with Tiecollector that it looks more like an end table.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by