Bread Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by why, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    My latest attempt at decent rye bread. Not quite there yet, but getting better. I'm using yeast and a little over half rye flour, let it sit most of the day to get it a little sour. I add an egg to get it to hold together. Very soft and cake like. I really need to just start some sourdough so that I can make proper rye bread. Crappy cell phone pic warning: [​IMG]
    You need to ask for a starter culture or buy good rye bread and use that as a starter. http://www.nordicbreads.com/ Otherwise if you go at it yourself you will need to start with making your own "root" from water, milk and rye flour. Good rye bread is not dependent on yeast at all, but on sour-doe starter, as you already know.[​IMG] Good luck.
     


  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Never made bread before yesterday, but one of our friends gave us a bread baking book for Christmas, so I figured I'd try. Result wasn't too bad: [​IMG]
     


  3. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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  4. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    Never made bread before yesterday, but one of our friends gave us a bread baking book for Christmas, so I figured I'd try. Result wasn't too bad:

    Really? You seem like an accomplished home chef. Seems like you'd have done it before. I've done it and I suck at life.

    Also it looks pretty good.

    If anyone is interested...my cousin has a breadmaking blog with some good recipes:

    http://breadmantalking.blogspot.com/


    Taking a quick look at it, thanks!
     


  5. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    we still can't get much aeration in our baguettes; we have a baguette pan, we mix the dough and leave it overnight and it's very wet the whole way through, and we have several ceramic pots inside the oven giving steam by the time we put the baguettes in to bake; they come out looking okay on the outside, but way too heavy, not enough aeration throughout. What should we do
     


  6. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    ^ this

    i need help with my crumb structure. way too dense
     


  7. Redwoood

    Redwoood Senior member

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    ^ this i need help with my crumb structure. way too dense
    I'm not an expert, but I believe this can have various explanations - wrong temperature - not enough yeast - not enough sugar to feed the yeast - yeast killed somehow (too much salt?) - not enough salt - not enough time for the yeast to work (ie, rise) - dough too dry - dough too glutinous or not glutinous enough - incorrect kneading Try this simple recipe (makes for two baguettes or 6 minis): 1 1/2 cups warm water 1 tbs sugar 1 tsp salt 4 cups bread flour 2 tsp dry yeast Mix and knead the dough (you can use bread machine if you have one). Important: Add water or flour to make sure it's a smooth ball. If you poke it with a finger, it should feel elastic. If the surface of the dough ball feels slimy and sticks to your finger, it's too wet, and you should add a pinch or two of flour, knead thoroughly, and try again. If the ball feels hard and lumpy or breaks where you poke it, it's too dry, add tbs of water, knead, and try again. Then for first rise, let sit in warm covered place (e.g., the machine) for 1 1/2 hours. Afterwards, punch down the dough, let it rise again for 45 minutes. Dump it out onto work surface, divide into two (or 6 for mini-baguettes) slightly flattened ovals, and let rest (covered) for 20 minutes. I use very-slightly oiled-up ceran wrap as a cover. Shaping: Flatten the oval, making it roughly rectangular. Fold the long sides on top of each other, and pinch the seam. Flatten. rinse, repeat. I like to poke into the flattened dough with my fingers (before I fold) to create little cavities, no idea if it helps, but it doesn't harm. If you do this right, the dough will naturally lengthen. You can also roll it up instead of folding it repeatedly. Once you're done with this, roll the dough back and forth to lengthen it and make it cylindrical. When you're done, roll it seam side down and cover again. I like to do this on parchment paper, but you can use some other surface I guess. I like to oil the resting surface slightly (but I guess you can use a floured towel or something), and sprinkle it with corn meal, and re-use the ceran wrap as cover. Let rise for 1 - 1 1/2 hours, it shouldn't quite double in size. Baking: About 15 minutes before you want to start baking, preheat oven to 400 deg F. I like to use a pizza stone. When you're ready to bake, wash the dough/log with water, i.e., spread water onto it, e.g., using your hands. With a sharp knife, cut fairly deep (about one third down) diagonal slashes across the log, about 3-4 inches apart. Remove the stone from the oven (if you use one). Sprinkle it generously with corn meal if you are placing the dough directly onto it. If you use parchment paper, moisten it and transfer it onto the stone. Put the stone back in the oven. Bake for 15 - 25 minutes. It should show a nice reddish brown colour on top, when you tap it, it should sound hollow. Turn off oven, open door a few inches, leave bread inside to cool for 5 - 10 minutes. Then pull it out and let it cool on a wire rack. Tricks: Put multiple mini baguettes inside at the same time, and pull them out at different times to see what is the optimal baking time. You can preheat to slightly more than 400 degrees, and then reduce once the dough is inside, to account for the temperature drop when you open the door. You can place something like a cast iron pan inside the oven and pour boiling water inside the hot pan, right after you placed the dough inside, for additional steam.
     


  8. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    I'm not an expert, but I believe this can have various explanations

    - wrong temperature
    - not enough yeast
    - not enough sugar to feed the yeast
    - yeast killed somehow (too much salt?)
    - not enough salt
    - not enough time for the yeast to work (ie, rise)
    - dough too dry
    - dough too glutinous or not glutinous enough
    - incorrect kneading

    Try this simple recipe (makes for two baguettes or 6 minis):

    1 1/2 cups warm water
    1 tbs sugar
    1 tsp salt
    4 cups bread flour
    2 tsp dry yeast

    Mix and knead the dough (you can use bread machine if you have one).
    Important: Add water or flour to make sure it's a smooth ball.
    If you poke it with a finger, it should feel elastic. If the surface of the dough ball feels slimy and sticks to your finger, it's too wet, and you should add a pinch or two of flour, knead thoroughly, and try again.
    If the ball feels hard and lumpy or breaks where you poke it, it's too dry, add tbs of water, knead, and try again.

    Then for first rise, let sit in warm covered place (e.g., the machine) for 1 1/2 hours.
    Afterwards, punch down the dough, let it rise again for 45 minutes.
    Dump it out onto work surface, divide into two (or 6 for mini-baguettes) slightly flattened ovals, and let rest (covered) for 20 minutes. I use greased up ceran wrap as a cover.

    Shaping:
    Flatten the oval, making it roughly rectangular. Fold the long sides on top of each other, and pinch the seam. Flatten. rinse, repeat. I like to poke into the flattened dough with my fingers (before I fold) to create little cavities, no idea if it helps, but it doesn't harm.
    If you do this right, the dough will naturally lengthen. You can also roll it up instead of folding it repeatedly. Once you're done with this, roll the dough back and forth to lengthen it and make it cylindrical. When you're done, roll it seam side down and cover again. I like to do this on parchment paper, but you can use some other surface I guess.
    I like to oil the resting surface slightly (but I guess you can use a floured towel or something), and sprinkle it with corn meal, and re-use the ceran wrap as cover. Let rise for 1 - 1 1/2 hours, it shouldn't quite double in size.

    Baking:
    About 15 minutes before you want to start baking, preheat oven to 400 deg F.
    I like to use a pizza stone. When you're ready to bake, wash the dough/log with water, i.e., spread water onto it, e.g., using your hands. With a sharp knife, cut fairly deep (about one third down) diagonal slashes across the log, about 3-4 inches apart.
    Remove the stone from the oven (if you use one). Sprinkle it generously with corn meal if you are placing the dough directly onto it. If you use parchment paper, moisten it and transfer it onto the stone. Put the stone back in the oven.
    Bake for 20 - 25 minutes. It should show a nice reddish brown colour on top, when you tap it, it should sound hollow.
    Turn off oven, open door a few inches, leave bread inside to cool for 5 - 10 minutes.
    Then pull it out and let it cool on a wire rack.

    Tricks:
    Put multiple mini baguettes inside at the same time, and pull them out at different times to see what is the optimal baking time.
    You can preheat to slightly more than 400 degrees, and then reduce once the dough is inside, to account for the temperature drop when you open the door.
    You can place something like a cast iron pan inside the oven and pour boiling water inside the hot pan, right after you placed the dough inside, for additional steam.


    woah. that was great info. i'm going to implement the tricks and see how it goes. thank du
     


  9. Redwoood

    Redwoood Senior member

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    woah. that was great info. i'm going to implement the tricks and see how it goes. thank du
    note that these tricks will probably not help you with the structure of the bread. Getting the dough right is the most important thing. ETA: BTW, I realized, that for a thin baguette, 15 minutes may be enough. so I extended the range to 15-25.
     


  10. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    Anybody familiar enough with German and breadmaking to be able to tell me what kind of flour I am buying? There is little selection for flours here and the flours that seem to have specialized gluten powers are all German, so I've bought them but don't know what kind of gluten power they're packing, and i know German bread requirements are a little different than what I'll probably be making: I have- -Demeter Roggenmehl -Weizen vollkornmeal (I hope this is not white cornmeal? [​IMG]) -Weizenmehl Type 550 -Same as above, but in many numeric varieties, starting at 450, going up to 1150 I think. I have like 10 different bags of flour here. I had specialized baguette flour from Maison Kayser but that has almost run out.
     


  11. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    Is anyone familiar with this book? It has 580 five star reviews on Amazon and has leavened my curiosity. Thinking about trying it. [​IMG]
     


  12. Redwoood

    Redwoood Senior member

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  13. Nosu3

    Nosu3 Senior member

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    I'm going to try and make bread out of acorns. I'll post pics if I get to making it.
     


  14. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    Are you being serious or not? Acorn flour is actually used in Korean cooking. (0)
     


  15. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    but in mook and not bread. it sounds interesting. post results
     


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