1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Brass Nails used to impede shoe wear

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by lucidream, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. lucidream

    lucidream Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    The following images are, in my opinion, examples of brass nails used to protect soles in common wear areas.

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]



    I'm wondering if anyone has any knowledge base on this?

    My goal is to have a cobbler add these as an alternative to shoe taps, and to slow down the wear of my heals. Curious what level of success I may achieve?
     
  2. meister

    meister Senior member

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    
    Don't waste you time. Just have rubber or alternatively tips or recessed plates.
     
  3. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

    Messages:
    20,575
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Location:
    Heavenly & Northstar
    

    i too am curious..
     
  4. CTBrummie

    CTBrummie Senior member

    Messages:
    707
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    You'll skid a lot if you have nails in your heels...
     
  5. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

    Messages:
    20,575
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Location:
    Heavenly & Northstar
  6. lucidream

    lucidream Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    Still hoping to get some first hand experience on this topic, as all replies to date seem to be general? I don't have a local cobbler that does recessed taps, the ones I had installed are also now rusting. I'm looking for a far more elegant solution. I may simply have a cobbler add some brass nails to some so-so florsheims that I have as an experiment, but I don't want to topy or add unrecessed taps to any more shoes.
     
  7. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

    Messages:
    18,044
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Central Booking
    

    That solution is not elegant....unless after shaking someone's hand, you take off your shoes and show them the bottom!
    Just get rubber...
     
  8. dbhdnhdbh

    dbhdnhdbh Senior member

    Messages:
    330
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2012
    Elegance is in the eye of the beholder. If the OP likes the look, why not? But you don't need a cobbler for this, just some nails. Give it a try and see what you think. You may have to keep up with countersinking as the softer material around the nails wears down.

    Just make sure the nails are short enough that they do not go too far through the toe. Heels, no problem. The nails and V cleat of the old Florsheims are slippery. You may want something over them to avoid landing on your face.
     
  9. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

    Messages:
    20,575
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Location:
    Heavenly & Northstar
    Let us know what you find. I too think they are a better solution than plastic especially if you don't have a b.nelson in your town.
     
  10. onix

    onix Senior member

    Messages:
    3,847
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    As a related discussion, this is how I solved my problem, nearly 3 years ago (see original discussion). They worked beautifully. I now don't do that anymore, since I now have enough shoes in my rotation.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  11. upintheair

    upintheair Member

    Messages:
    9
    Joined:
    May 16, 2012
    I spent some time chatting with a bespoke shoe maker when i visited Florence (her site http://www.saskiascarpesumisura.com/it/) and she was of the opinion that nails in the heels are purely decorative and do nothing for increasing longevity in the sole. She will add nails for the shoes she makes for display purposes but doesn't for any of the actual shoes for her clients.
     
  12. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,995
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    

    IS that a piece of leather?
     
  13. lucidream

    lucidream Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    yes, suede

    edit: I maintain that this is a topic that has been touched upon in insufficient depth.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  14. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,995
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    

    That's very clever, a little piece of suede glued on the tip. That looks very nice, albeit only works in dry days. Thanks for sharing.
     
  15. bubba04

    bubba04 Senior member

    Messages:
    322
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2010
    Location:
    Hotlanta
    Anyone has experience with this?

    [​IMG]
     
  16. dbhdnhdbh

    dbhdnhdbh Senior member

    Messages:
    330
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2012
    I have been using that anti slip tape method for a few months now. So far it is working great. It does fine in wet weather. It protects the sole and improves traction on smooth floors and carpet. I have only walked on ice once with the tape in place. I was careful and did not slip, but it is too soon to tell how well it works for winter wear. I use grey tape, rather than black. I think it looks better. Much cheaper than rubber sole protectors, and does not make the shoe hot. I find the sole protectors provide so much insulation that they get make the shoes uncomfortable.
     
  17. dddrees

    dddrees Senior member

    Messages:
    9,161
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Interesting, never heard of this before.
     
  18. dddrees

    dddrees Senior member

    Messages:
    9,161
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Interesting, looks like a pretty decent DYI alternative.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  19. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,238
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Brass nails do slow down the wear on leather heels, and, provided they do not cut the inseam, could do the same for leather soles. The brass is harder than the leather but not so hard as to cause significant slipping.

    Brass nails in rubber are borderline ridiculous.

    Solid brass nails are expensive and good ones hard to find.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  20. dbhdnhdbh

    dbhdnhdbh Senior member

    Messages:
    330
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2012
    Some people asked for details on the anti slip tape, so here it is

    I use 3M anti slip tape. It is available from Amazon. I first got a short 2 inch wide roll. This is somewhat of a hassle, since it takes several strips to cover the sole. However, 4 inch and wider rolls are available only in very long lengths. I wanted to make sure I liked it before spending that much. Once I decided I liked it I found a source that sells rolls in 4 and 6 inch widths. The 6 inch was too expensive, so I got 4 inch. I will see whether I can find where I got it. Using the 4 inch, my material cost is a little under $2 per pair.

    The AAAC poster "Crownship" gave detailed instructions, but basically you lightly scuff the sole, apply glue (2 coats), then apply the anti slip tape. Trim the edges with small scissors. It pays to be very careful about fully coating the sole with glue, since the edges are where peeling occurs. Crownship used rubber cement. I tried that, but it does not hold all that well. He used tiny nails to tack down the edges when they came up. I picked up some Barge cement from my cobbler, but it is also available from Amazon. I used the new toluene free (blue tube) version. Apparently the old (yellow) version had higher VOC but also held better. I find the blue stuff works very well, so I am not considering a switch.

    If you use rubber cement, you apply one coat, let it dry ~ 10-15 minutes, then apply a second coat and put on the tape immediately. You get a few seconds while it binds and you can reposition the tape during that time. If you use Barge, you apply one coat, let it set ~15-20 minutes, apply a second coat, wait another 15-20 minutes, then apply tape. It will bind instantly, so be very careful of the position of the tape, you will not be able to change it.

    I don't know how much it matters, but I put the tape on the center first, carefully smooth it towards the edges, then first press, then lightly pound it in with a hammer. I saw a cobbler hammering a glue down resole, so I figured it was worth a try. He was really banging hard, which I am not willing to do to my shoes.

    The first shoes I did have now had 15 wears 6 of these one wet pavement, 3 of those with long walks (~2 miles) on wet pavement. No detectable wear yet.

    I also tried Jessup safety tape, which comes in a translucent version. It lets the original color of the sole show through, but it does not seem to be nearly as sturdy.

    DWFII,

    Always interested in anything you have to say. Why are brass nails in rubber ridiculous? Is the problem brass, specifically, or putting any nails in rubber? I can find brass nails listed online that don't seem that pricey. How would we do it ourself types know good from bad nails?

    thanks
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by