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Bottom sleeve buttonhole

zjpj83

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On most suits I have the bottom button is 1 1/2 inch from the end of the sleeve. But, I believe I read somewhere that 1 1/4 is actually the proper measurement.

At the risk of addressing the "rules," is there one here, one way or the other?
 

von Rothbart

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It ranges from 3/4" to 1 1/4", measured from the center of the button to the sleeve edge. Â My opinion is that this too depends on a person's height. Â The distance should never be greater than 1 1/4".
That's according the "rules" as stated by Manton. Origin of the above quote. Â On page 5.
 

Renault78law

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That's according the "rules" as stated by Manton.
Don't you mean, "Manton's rules"? Haha, kidding Manton, kidding.
And zjpj83, shame on you for missing page 5 of that post.
 

zjpj83

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ah, missed that one. Ok, thanks.
 

Manton

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The Savile Row standard, to the best of my knowledge, is that the bottom button should be no further than 1 1/4" from the edge of the sleeve. That's measured from the center of the button, not its edge (i.e., from the buttonhole itself).

I have seen it done as close as 3/4", which looks good on shorter guys. But no closer.
 

zjpj83

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I do actually have one with 3/4 inch and I think it looks really silly, like it was a second hand jacket that had the sleeves shortened.

I'm going to go with 1 1/4 inch. thanks.
 

BjornH

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I had handsewn buttonholes put on a jacket recently. I got convinced that 1 1/4 was the proper distance and we even took out a measuring tape in the store and measured a few suits (borelli, corneliani and more) and they were all more or less like that.

However, when I got my coat I realized that I should have listened to 'my inner voice' and insisted on 3/4 or so. That beeing said, they also disregarded my instructions and made the sleeves the usual 1/2 inch too long so I suppose I could fix both problems with out problems in one go. BTW, I'm 5'9 so YMMV.

B
 

uppercase

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In all of these minute issues, a good tailor will take care of you.

There's no need to guide him on such minutae. Give him some credit that he is schooled in the traditions and knows what he is doing.

I would focus, in bespoke, on the larger issues such as house style; material: is it suitable to your purpose , your coloring , is it flattering; silhouette, again is it flattering and suitable and do you like his general style. Etc.

School yourself in the larger issues of what looks good on you and let the tailor take care of the details and take care of you. I place alot of trust in a good tailor; if he is skilled and has a reputation, put yourself in his experienced hands. He can guide you.

Know what looks good on you, give him a good idea of what you would like him to produce for you, and let your tailor take care of the rest, the 1/4" here and there. Many tailors are artisans, have much more experience than you, can guide you and can exceed your expections.

Choose your tailor well - one whose house style you already like, put your trust in him, develop a cordial, professional relationship with him, and I'll bet he produces a suit you'll be very happy with.
 

imageWIS

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In all of these minute issues, a good tailor will take care of you.

There's no need to guide him on such minutae. Give him some credit that he is schooled in the traditions and knows what he is doing.

I would focus, in bespoke, on the larger issues such as house style; material: is it suitable to your purpose , your coloring , is it flattering; silhouette, again is it flattering and suitable and do you like his general style. Etc.

School yourself in the larger issues of what looks good on you and let the tailor take care of the details and take care of you. I place alot of trust in a good tailor; if he is skilled and has a reputation, put yourself in his experienced hands. He can guide you.

Know what looks good on you, give him a good idea of what you would like him to produce for you, and let your tailor take care of the rest, the 1/4" here and there. Many tailors are artisans, have much more experience than you, can guide you and can exceed your expections.

Choose your tailor well - one whose house style you already like, put your trust in him, develop a cordial, professional relationship with him, and I'll bet he produces a suit you'll be very happy with.
Yes, but it is better to go through a checklist to make sure that you don't forget about anything. Better to be safe than sorry, especially at bespoke prices.

Jon.
 

zjpj83

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I don't know, uppercase - the thing about bespoke is you specify the deatails. They do the house style/silhouette, but you say how wide you want your lapels, and how far apart you want your buttons, how you want your pockets to look. I think it's the details that the customer has the most say over.
 

uppercase

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Well, in my view, my principle interest in having a bespoke suit is to have a suit made to flatter me: the material, the proportion and the silhouette.

I would choose a tailor for his reputation, house style, one having a specific ethic, view and standard.

I wouldn't presume to tell an experienced tailor how wide to make the lapels nor where to place the buttons on a double breasted for example. I would trust that his eye is better than mine.

I would paint a picture for him of what I wanted to achieve, the big picture. If I wanted crescent pockets, for example, I would discuss the matter with him and be guided by him. If his view was that they would not be suitable, for a this particular suit, I would respect, and take, his view.

But generally, if I have chosen my tailor well, and know my taste and his style well, I would be guided throughout by his ethic and rely on his taste and design sense.

A good tailor will not only sew you a suit but gently guide you and steer you right throughout to get the best result. And that's why you want to look for an artist, and listen to his advice, and not someone who only operates a sewing machine.

It's a pleasure to work with a tailor with strong views and standards and a great learning experience as well.
 

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