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Jupiter_rain

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The original Tyrolean shoes, such as the Paraboots, Heschung, and other brands, are made and intended for the snowy European Tyrolean mountains: their sole, construction type, and Norwegian stitching make them suitable for such environments.
How about the Nordic climate? It get get either way here - a winter with little snow and winter with a lot of snow.
 

Mercurio

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How about the Nordic climate? It get get either way here - a winter with little snow and winter with a lot of snow.
I really can't tell you for sure: they still being shoes, that won't protect your ankles. A pair of Tyrolean shoes won't replace a pair of taller, warm-lined chunky boots, which probably would be more suitable footwear for cold weather with a lot of snow.
 

Jupiter_rain

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I really can't tell you for sure: they still being shoes, that won't protect your ankles. A pair of Tyrolean shoes won't replace a pair of taller, warm-lined chunky boots, which probably would be more suitable footwear for cold weather with a lot of snow.
What would be an example of a chunky boot? Guess, they are a more in nowadays compared to narrower models.
 

Mercurio

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What would be an example of a chunky boot? Guess, they are a more in nowadays compared to narrower models.
I used the word "chunky boots" to refer to some water and weather resistance but with style as well, as some of the ones displayed in this thread. I was not thinking of waterproof boots, as these need to be or use tech materials, such as the ones used for trekking.

Which ones? It would depend on how you intend to use your winter footwear. Are you going to spend most of your time outdoors? They would be different from the ones needed for an indoor office environment. It depends as well on how you dress for your daily activities, is it casual, relaxed, or formal, dressed-up?

If you give us more details, we could suggest some alternatives. Don't forget to mention your intended budget. In any case, I might advise getting at least two pairs for a minimal rotation.
 
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Genericuser1

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*Looks at cool boots, sees hair on pants, looks at avatar* It checks out, a fellow cat owner! :D I can relate to always having some hair on my clothes, no matter how diligent I am with the lint roller.
Used a lint brush too, he is murder on black clothes. Fur everywhere.
 

Jupiter_rain

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I used the word "chunky boots" to refer to some water and weather resistance but with style as well, as some of the ones displayed in this thread. I was not thinking of waterproof boots, as these need to be or use tech materials, such as the ones used for trekking.

Which ones? It would depend on how you intend to use your winter footwear. Are you going to spend most of your time outdoors? They would be different from the ones needed for an indoor office environment. It depends as well on how you dress for your daily activities, is it casual, relaxed, or formal, dressed-up?

If you give us more details, we could suggest some alternatives. Don't forget to mention your intended budget. In any case, I might advise getting at least two pairs for a minimal rotation.
Thanks for ellaborating. Have you seen my first post in this thread on the previous page? I have described the context and preferences for shoes pretty accuratelly in that post. I do aim to expand my collection of shoes and can do this gradually due to a limited budget.

By the way, I have some good experience with Loake shoes and am curious to try Paraboot Chambord Cafe. The Paraboot ones would probably work with a pair of thicker socks duting winter.
 
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ajay199127

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Gents, from a fit perspective. How does a one-piece whole cut (like Burnham) compare to a side seam Chelsea?
 

Mercurio

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Thanks for ellaborating. Have you seen my first post in this thread on the previous page? I have described the context and preferences for shoes pretty accuratelly in that post. I do aim to expand my collection of shoes and can do this gradually due to a limited budget.

By the way, I have some good experience with Loake shoes and am curious to try Paraboot Chambord Cafe. The Paraboot ones would probably work with a pair of thicker socks duting winter.
Sorry, I didn't relate your previous post to your Paraboot question. I thought you were referring to their Michael model, not the Chambord Cafe, which is a wonderful pair of shoes for what you need, that would pair perfectly with thicker socks and the kind of clothes you use.

I own a few chukka boots from the 1880 Line from Loake: two Pimlico pairs, one pair of Kempton, and another made by Loake for Herring. Since that, I moved to Cheaney models which have in my opinion, better quality leather and construction, at least in the models that I own, even though I appreciate Loake.

Have you considered the chukka or the Chelsea boots as a possible alternative? They could fit your style and there are different options from Loake, Cheaney, and other brands.
 

Mercurio

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Gents, from a fit perspective. How does a one-piece whole cut (like Burnham) compare to a side seam Chelsea?
From my experience, there isn't a noticeable difference in fit. I own a pair of R.M.Williams Chelsea boots which are a one-piece whole cut, and a few other pairs from Cheaney, Loake, and other brands which have a side seam.
 

Jupiter_rain

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Sorry, I didn't relate your previous post to your Paraboot question. I thought you were referring to their Michael model, not the Chambord Cafe, which is a wonderful pair of shoes for what you need, that would pair perfectly with thicker socks and the kind of clothes you use.

I own a few chukka boots from the 1880 Line from Loake: two Pimlico pairs, one pair of Kempton, and another made by Loake for Herring. Since that, I moved to Cheaney models which have in my opinion, better quality leather and construction, at least in the models that I own, even though I appreciate Loake.

Have you considered the chukka or the Chelsea boots as a possible alternative? They could fit your style and there are different options from Loake, Cheaney, and other brands.
Thanks. Do you mean Paraboot Chambord Cafe would work fine with my prefered smart casual style? I have interest in trying wider pants and less slim fitting items in general, but maintain the elegant look at the same time. Paraboot Chambord seem to be a bit dressier variant, which might work and add some desired variety to the wardrobe.

Absolutely, I love Chelsea boots and still have an old pair of suede ones. I am curious to try leather Chelseas (Loake or other brand) and see how they would work in autumn in early winter. There definitely are a few appealing dactors about them - easy to put the on and off and thw more formal look they give to the outfits. I avoided wearing my suede Chelseas in rain and snow, but maybe leather variants are more suitable for that?

As for Chukka boots, I am still to try them. Have not had a pair yet.
 

Mercurio

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Thanks. Do you mean Paraboot Chambord Cafe would work fine with my prefered smart casual style? I have interest in trying wider pants and less slim fitting items in general, but maintain the elegant look at the same time. Paraboot Chambord seem to be a bit dressier variant, which might work and add some desired variety to the wardrobe.

Absolutely, I love Chelsea boots and still have an old pair of suede ones. I am curious to try leather Chelseas (Loake or other brand) and see how they would work in autumn in early winter. There definitely are a few appealing dactors about them - easy to put the on and off and thw more formal look they give to the outfits. I avoided wearing my suede Chelseas in rain and snow, but maybe leather variants are more suitable for that?

As for Chukka boots, I am still to try them. Have not had a pair yet.
Absolutely, the Paraboot Chambord can be dressed up or down very easily.

On the other hand, suede is a resilient material, more than one would expect. Use a nano protector spray and they would withstand most kinds of weather. On the chukka boots, I am an addict: they are extremely versatile, as they are in between shoes and boots. Maybe you should have a look at the following thread:

 

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