Books on modern etiquette

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Oli2012, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. Oli2012

    Oli2012 Senior member

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    Hey,

    I'm 23 and am nearing the end of law school. I'm finding myself at lunches/functions with people older than me and am adjusting to dinners with multiple forks, red wine, small talk with clients etc as opposed to my usual beer and pizza. Dating is becoming very much the same too.

    I was wondering if you could suggest some one stop books with information on rules regarding manners, behaviour and proper etiquette in such situations?

    Thanks!
     
  2. YOLO EMSHI

    YOLO EMSHI Senior member

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    Parents? Older Relatives?
     
  3. Oli2012

    Oli2012 Senior member

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    Solicitors, barristers, their wives, etc.
     
  4. YOLO EMSHI

    YOLO EMSHI Senior member

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    No I mean shouldn't this be the sort of thing your parents (or any other older relatives) know about, indeed have taught you by now?
     
  5. Oli2012

    Oli2012 Senior member

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    The finer details haven't. I'd really like to learn to give off the air of a modern gentlemen rather ran a random collage of rules.
     
  6. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Well its probably too late for that isn't it? Gotta give the guy credit for recognizing his shortcomings and wanting to improve them.

    I mean fuck--most of my friends don't seem to realize a knife can be used for more than just cutting things. They will instead use their fingers to push food onto their forks. Ask them to set a table and they need to know what is cooking so they can gauge whether or not they have to put out knives.

    Oddly enough...I bet they all know which fork to use (but that's a trope that shows up in so many movies/tv shows that I imagine everybody knows now).
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  7. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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  8. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    it's always appropriate to order champagne.
     
  9. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    Except at a wake. Hard liquor only.
     
  10. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    What if the person that died loved champagne?
     
  11. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    You are permitted to place sentimental gifts in the casket with the body. But the wake isn't about the dead person, it's about the living finding a way to numb their feelings. Hard liquor or gtfo.
     

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