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Blundstone polishing disaster

digits

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Hi all,

I bought a pair of new blundstone boots (black, dress boot model). At work, they want the shoes to be polished, so I thought, no problem, I'll polish the new boots to make them look more shiny.

I've never polished a shoe before, but armed with some youtube tutorials and a shoe shining kit, I started going at it.

1) Brushed the shoe
2) Applied polish
3) Removed excess polish
4) Used the brush to make it shine

I waited a day and repeated these steps. It looked pretty good.

That was a week ago. I decided to wear them in in the house. I wore them for 20 minutes and they looked absolutely destroyed. The polish is flaking off, if I touch it my hands are black.


Any suggestions on how to fix this properly? Or did I just completely ruin everything?

Thank you,
digits
 

David J. Cooper

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Some leather finishes aren't meant to be polished or are corrected grain. I believe Blundstones are oiled. It should wipe clean eventually.
 

digits

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Some leather finishes aren't meant to be polished or are corrected grain. I believe Blundstones are oiled. It should wipe clean eventually.
What product should I wipe it with?

For reference, I used this youtube movie as a tutorial, which specifically used blundstones:
Not saying you are wrong of course, as I obviously did something wrong...
 

circumspice

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You probably applied too much polish - where you see the white stuff appears to be the flexible parts of the boot = your movement is breaking up dried out, extra polish.

If you have a scrap t-shirt, tear in into rags. Moisten them a bit, and use as buff cloths. As they pick up black polish, switch to clean portions of your rag.
 

digits

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You probably applied too much polish - where you see the white stuff appears to be the flexible parts of the boot = your movement is breaking up dried out, extra polish.

If you have a scrap t-shirt, tear in into rags. Moisten them a bit, and use as buff cloths. As they pick up black polish, switch to clean portions of your rag.
Thank you.

You are correct, all the ugly stuff is happening on the area of the boot that is "flexible". The rag does take some polish off, but now there is a fairly rough surface remaining. It looks a bit like an orange peel. Do I just keep buffing, or should I add polish again, or something else?
 

breakaway01

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I think two issues: too much polish and you probably used a wax polish. Although it shines better, it is inflexible and tends to crack where the leather flexes, especially if the wax layer is too thick. At this point you may have to use a stripper like Renomat. Use a black cream polish for the flexible areas and a wax polish for the toe and heel.
 

digits

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I think two issues: too much polish and you probably used a wax polish. Although it shines better, it is inflexible and tends to crack where the leather flexes, especially if the wax layer is too thick. At this point you may have to use a stripper like Renomat. Use a black cream polish for the flexible areas and a wax polish for the toe and heel.
Thank you, I will look for that.

Would the stripper damage the leather if applied too thick or too long? Just want to know how sensitive it is and what the risk is of damaging the shoes :)
 

breakaway01

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Same principle applies to using a stripper/cleaner like Renomat as to applying polish—small amounts at a time and patience. Apply it to a clean rag and rub it in, don’t pour it on the boot and walk away.
 

Dandy_dapper

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What product should I wipe it with?

For reference, I used this youtube movie as a tutorial, which specifically used blundstones:
Not saying you are wrong of course, as I obviously did something wrong...
so cool, brave job man
 

maxalex

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Unfortunately Blundstone is one of those companies that decided to go for quantity over quality. These “Australian” shoes are now made in Asia of crap corrected-grain leather that can’t really be polished; I guess they figure their buyers are mostly people who just want knockabouts and don’t care if they look dull as a horseshoe.

Beyond that, the rubber soles will crack and deteriorate in a couple years.

If it’s nice shiny Chelsea boots you want, spend more and get a pair of R.M. Williams, which are still made in Australia of fine leather. They’ll last a lifetime—you can get the Goodyear welted soles replaced by the factory—and always take a good shining. Many other English brands are good too (and often more expensive), but I find R.M. Williams hit the sweet spot between quality and value.
 

David J. Cooper

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In the FAQ section of the Blundstone site basically tells you that the leather is oiled and should mot be polished.
 

digits

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Unfortunately Blundstone is one of those companies that decided to go for quantity over quality. These “Australian” shoes are now made in Asia of crap corrected-grain leather that can’t really be polished; I guess they figure their buyers are mostly people who just want knockabouts and don’t care if they look dull as a horseshoe.

Beyond that, the rubber soles will crack and deteriorate in a couple years.
This is the model in my picture: https://www.blundstone.com.au/mens-or-womens-black-dress-boots-style-063

Their description says "Black Full Grain Leather"
Is that just a marketing gimmick or is there more to it than meets the eye?

Just trying to learn :)

I got some cream polish, I'll hope to see some good results tomorrow after it dries up nicely.
 

maxalex

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In the FAQ section of the Blundstone site basically tells you that the leather is oiled and should mot be polished.
That’s right—which is their weaselly way of acknowledging they can’t be polished because the leather sucks.
 

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