• I'm happy to introduce the Styleforum Happy Hour, our brand new podcast featuring lively discussion about menswear and the fashion industry. In the inaugural edition, a discussion of what's going on in retail today. Please check it out on the Journal. All episodes will be also be available soon on your favorite podcast platform.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Blücher-spelling

andrew96

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
272
Reaction score
3
Okay, people "blücher" is not spelled "blucher". That funny looking "u" with the dots is called a u-umlaut and changes the letter completely. It can be substituted with "ue"(as can any umlaut). So, if you don't know the code(right alt + 0252) just add an "e",bluecher.

It comes from Germanic language. Before you say anything bad about Der Deutsch read this sentence:

I had to polish the Polish furniture.

Source:
Ich komme aus Deutschland.
Also, my name is spelled with an umlaut.
 

blahman

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
4,559
Reaction score
372
Or the alternate spelling: d-e-r-b-y :p

Thanks for the little language trivia though.
 

cmacey

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Messages
207
Reaction score
1
Originally Posted by andrew96
Okay, people "blücher" is not spelled "blucher". That funny looking "u" with the dots is called a u-umlaut and changes the letter completely. It can be substituted with "ue"(as can any umlaut). So, if you don't know the code(right alt + 0252) just add an "e",bluecher.

It comes from Germanic language. Before you say anything bad about Der Deutsch read this sentence:

I had to polish the Polish furniture.

Source:
Ich komme aus Deutschland.
Also, my name is spelled with an umlaut.


I knew I woke up today for a reason...
 

andrew96

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
272
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by blahman
Or the alternate spelling: d-e-r-b-y :p

Thanks for the little language trivia though.


You just don't sound cool and educated if you say derby though. It's such a barbaric term.
 

Hans

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Messages
159
Reaction score
3
While we are on the topic, though, does anybody know why derby shoes are named (in US English) after Generalfeldmarschall von Blücher? He didn't invent them, did he? After all, he was a hussar, and presumably wore boots.
 

andrew96

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
272
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by Hans
While we are on the topic, though, does anybody know why derby shoes are named (in US English) after Generalfeldmarschall von Blücher? He didn't invent them, did he? After all, he was a hussar, and presumably wore boots.

I don't think it was named after him. I believe that in those days Blücher was a common name.
 

Mark from Plano

Lifestyle change - no homo
Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Messages
10,850
Reaction score
392


You don't say!
 

Hans

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Messages
159
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by andrew96
I believe that in those days Blücher was a common name.

... and then the Blüchers became extinct??
 

andrew96

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
272
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by Hans
... and then the Blüchers became extinct??

"Amongst the great surnames of Germany that of "Blucher" is one of the most prominent. Like many such surnames it is of residential origins, and derives from the village of the same name near Boizenburg, on the river Elbe. The placename is of Slavonic origin, and it is thought that it describes a particular type of log cabin common in the region in ancient times. The surname is also found in the spelling forms of Bluecher and Bluechert. Not only is "Blucher" one of the most prominent of German surnames, with Coats of Arms granted to nameholders in Bavaria, Pomerania, Prussia and Mecklenburg (the epicentre of the surname) it is one of the earliest, as shown below. The most famous of the nameholders is probably Gebhard Leberecht Von Blucher, Prince of Wahlstadt and victor of Waterloo (1815) with the Duke of Wellington. Other (Church) recordings include Anna Maria Von Bluecher, who was baptised at Sukow, Mecklenburg, on June 1st 1598, and Joachim Bluecher, who married Elspeth Hamborg at Schlagsdorf, Mecklenburg, on April 29th 1662. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ulrich Von Blucher, which was dated 1214, in the "Medieval Land Charters of the Province of Mecklenburg", Germany, during the reign of Emperor Frederich 11 of the Holy Roman Empire, 1214 - 1250. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Blucher#ixzz1E54pFP71"


No, more likely they became spread out and then the name pool of Germany was diluted with middle eastern names. Most traditional names have been destroyed unfortunately. How many Oestmann's do you know? I'm one, we're from Hamburg and it was once a very common name in Germany.
 

L'Incandescent

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
16,386
Reaction score
7,597
Originally Posted by andrew96
Okay, people "blücher" is not spelled "blucher". That funny looking "u" with the dots is called a u-umlaut and changes the letter completely. It can be substituted with "ue"(as can any umlaut). So, if you don't know the code(right alt + 0252) just add an "e",bluecher.

It comes from Germanic language. Before you say anything bad about Der Deutsch read this sentence:


Note the bolded words. It comes from German. But it came to English. Blucher is an English word. Bluecher is not. If you don't want to take my word for it, try OED.
 

andrew96

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
272
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by L'Incandescent
Note the bolded words. It comes from German. But it came to English. Blucher is an English word. Bluecher is not. If you don't want to take my word for it, try OED.


Sure you can omit the diacritic in cafÃ
, but it looks like crap and shows you ignorance. I love the OED as much as anyone, probably more, although English is made of of many languages. All languages are. English is a Germanic language, and people should understand Germanic symbols. If you didn't know better and you read that, you'd think it was pronounced incorrectly.
 

L'Incandescent

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
16,386
Reaction score
7,597
Off topic, but I'd just like to state for the record that Eau d'Orange Verte is a very good Köln.
 

BevisFrondFan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
62
Reaction score
0
Originally Posted by andrew96
You just don't sound cool and educated if you say derby though. It's such a barbaric term.

Well, in that case... I'm sure we all want to sound cool and educated. By the way, just how is derby a barbaric term?

I wore cologne in Köln.
 

andrew96

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
272
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by BevisFrondFan
Well, in that case... I'm sure we all want to sound cool and educated. By the way, just how is derby a barbaric term?

I wore cologne in Köln.


Nothing really wrong with it. I'm a Kraut though so I'd rather use the German.
 

Featured Sponsor

How many pairs of shoes do you own?

  • 1 - 4

    Votes: 2 2.2%
  • 5 - 10

    Votes: 13 14.4%
  • 11 - 20

    Votes: 28 31.1%
  • 21 - 30

    Votes: 21 23.3%
  • 31 - 40

    Votes: 8 8.9%
  • 41 - 50

    Votes: 4 4.4%
  • 51 - 60

    Votes: 2 2.2%
  • 61 - 70

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 71 - 80

    Votes: 6 6.7%
  • 81 - 90

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 91 - 100

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 100+

    Votes: 6 6.7%

Related Threads

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
427,302
Messages
9,196,476
Members
193,141
Latest member
jfq12

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Top