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billion dollar home

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by GQgeek, Nov 27, 2010.

  1. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Yikes, what an eyesore.

    We've talked about this on other threads, and there is no PC way to put it... but as somebody who works/has worked with many international students and their families, I've found that many who come from "emerging" markets or formerly brutal regimes now enjoying great wealth have no idea where to draw any tasteful lines.

    A Chinese family I know who bought a beautiful home here in the States, and decorated it with the most hideous, plastic crap furniture I've ever seen. Mauve couches, those awful black plastic-framed mirrors, etc.

    This looks like more of the same; as others said... it looks like a bad hotel in Tokyo that was decorated during the "Bubble" economy years. There are tons of them... $400 a night and you get to pretend its the boom days of 1983!!! Woot woot!

    That being said, I like the IDEA of living in your own skyscraper... just not a hideous one.
     
  2. aj_del

    aj_del Senior member

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    ^^ I dont want to defend Ambani's ugly ass house, but hasn't everyone who has spend enormous amounts of money in the last 20 years on a house made an ugly house. Basically, if you spend more than a certain amount your fantasy is to live in a gaudy palace. Your taste runs more towards the Venetian hotel rather than Venice. You belong to the more is definitely more school of thought.

    It would be interesting to see recent homes which SF considers classy and cost more than 100 million at the time of building.
     
  3. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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    ^^ I dont want to defend Ambani's ugly ass house, but hasn't everyone who has spend enormous amounts of money in the last 20 years on a house made an ugly house. Basically, if you spend more than a certain amount your fantasy is to live in a gaudy palace. Your taste runs more towards the Venetian hotel rather than Venice. You belong to the more is definitely more school of thought.

    It would be interesting to see recent homes which SF considers classy and cost more than 100 million at the time of building.


    Wafic Said built a new house in Oxfordshire (Tusmore House) that is very classical in style. It's gigantic, obviously, but really works as an English country house.
     
  4. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Are you actually being serious? If you think this building is garish and unseemly, I really must question your knowledge of how many "old money" families made their fortunes. You're talking about slave labor, colonialism in the worst sense and a level of exploitation that would make most liberals faint and even cause blushing in staunch fiscal conservative Republicans.


    shut up, moron.
     
  5. SField

    SField Senior member

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    shut up, moron.

    Why? Because you're fucking wrong?
     
  6. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    You don't even know what I'm talking about. This has nothing to do with how the money was made. It's about how tacky and classless people with new money usually represent it. Rach agrees with me.
    Yikes, what an eyesore. We've talked about this on other threads, and there is no PC way to put it... but as somebody who works/has worked with many international students and their families, I've found that many who come from "emerging" markets or formerly brutal regimes now enjoying great wealth have no idea where to draw any tasteful lines.
    Quite honestly, I don't think many countries with new money are good at looking he part. Whenever you hear about some rich guy doing outlandish shit, it's usually from a developing region like India, Singapore, or Oman. Old money really does have a knack for class.
     
  7. SField

    SField Senior member

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    You don't even know what I'm talking about. This has nothing to do with how the money was made. It's about how tacky and classless people with new money usually represent it. Rach agrees with me.

    Well consider that "old money" generally inherit many of their properties and possessions.
     
  8. vitaminc

    vitaminc Senior member

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    You don't even know what I'm talking about. This has nothing to do with how the money was made. It's about how tacky and classless people with new money usually represent it. Rach agrees with me.

    500 years from now the building will be an estate representing the wealth of India in early 2000s. It will not be as 'classic' as those 'old' money estates today, but it will become 'classic' in couple centuries.
     
  9. intent

    intent Senior member

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    500 years from now the building will be an estate representing the wealth of India in early 2000s. It will not be as 'classic' as those 'old' money estates today, but it will become 'classic' in couple centuries.
    500 years from now that building will be eclipsed by others towering over it.
     
  10. SField

    SField Senior member

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    500 years from now that building will be eclipsed by others towering over it.

    Funny that that hasn't happened to some of the great buildings of Europe.

    If the Sears tower were next to the Louvre, it wouldn't make the latter any less significant.
     
  11. aj_del

    aj_del Senior member

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    But isnt the life of modern building like 100 years or something. I dont think they are designed to last more than that.
     
  12. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    But isnt the life of modern building like 100 years or something. I dont think they are designed to last more than that.

    I've seen how indians mix concrete - that building ins't going to last more than 100 years
     
  13. mkarim

    mkarim Senior member

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    I've seen how indians mix concrete - that building ins't going to last more than 100 years

    Maybe so but that's not much better than materials used in the US.
     
  14. aj_del

    aj_del Senior member

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    I've seen how indians mix concrete - that building ins't going to last more than 100 years

    Please share what you saw.

    Btw, are you an expert in construction on top of being an expert in all thinggs Indian?

    I wonder why you were contemplating getting a new wardrobe made by an indian tailor since you are well versed in how india and indians work. If the concrete in ambanis home is so poor you can imagine the quality of your suits.
     
  15. ljrcustom

    ljrcustom Senior member

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    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    You all are very entertaining.

    -LR
     
  16. CouttsClient

    CouttsClient Senior member

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    I wish more incredibly wealthy people built gigantic homes. A wealthy person who does so really is making a choice to employ many people just for the pleasure of living in a huge home. Here in America people complain so often about distribution of wealth but whenever someone who can afford to build a monstrous house builds one...they complain about that as well. Those things are money pits for the owners mostly because staffing them is incredibly...even the entry level handyman/housekeeper expect a minimum of $40-$50k. When I was looking for staff in LA the agency sent me the resume for a House Manager who worked without the founders of Google for 8 years...the salary requirement was outrageous. I'm sure he was worth it to them but I couldn't afford it. [​IMG] I say we all encourage the wealthiest to spend as much a possible. I would rather they build the largest home they can and directly employ 50+ people than for them to live in a 2500 sq ft tract home and employ 0 people. I don't care how ugly it is.
     
  17. SField

    SField Senior member

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    I wish more incredibly wealthy people built gigantic homes. A wealthy person who does so really is making a choice to employ many people just for the pleasure of living in a huge home.

    Here in America people complain so often about distribution of wealth but whenever someone who can afford to build a monstrous house builds one...they complain about that as well. Those things are money pits for the owners mostly because staffing them is incredibly...even the entry level handyman/housekeeper expect a minimum of $40-$50k. When I was looking for staff in LA the agency sent me the resume for a House Manager who worked without the founders of Google for 8 years...the salary requirement was outrageous. I'm sure he was worth it to them but I couldn't afford it. [​IMG] I say we all encourage the wealthiest to spend as much a possible.

    I would rather they build the largest home they can and directly employ 50+ people than for them to live in a 2500 sq ft tract home and employ 0 people. I don't care how ugly it is.


    Not to mention that projects like this, despite their ugliness, lead to innovation.
     
  18. not_a_virus.exe

    not_a_virus.exe Senior member

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    I thought he died fighting the Zerg.
    best post in this thread.
     
  19. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Employment for the sake of maintaining that house falls under the broken window fallacy. The redistribution of money from the owner to the servants is beneficial, but it comes at the expense of more worthwhile labor. The services rendered, let's say feather dusting this guy's forty mantles, provides no lingering benefit. It's not much different from suburban lawncare. In many instances, grass still grows back, is hidden behind a fence for nobody to use, and take away 50 man hours a summer to maintain.


     
  20. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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    Employment for the sake of maintaining that house falls under the broken window fallacy. The redistribution of money from the owner to the servants is beneficial, but it comes at the expense of more worthwhile labor. The services rendered, let's say feather dusting this guy's forty mantles, provides no lingering benefit. It's not much different from suburban lawncare. In many instances, grass still grows back, is hidden behind a fence for nobody to use, and take away 50 man hours a summer to maintain.

    Silly argument. Should trash men stop picking up trash because more trash will subsequently be generated? Should janitors stop mopping public toilets because they will just get grimey again? The "lingering benefit" statement makes no sense.

    Also, we are no longer cavemen where everyone has to be hunting or gathering. We live in a modern world in which people can have jobs that don't involve subsistence. This is how we can have artists, actors, writers and other people who produce no "worthwhile labor." It contributes to culture and the world we live in. A community with mowed lawns is nicer than a community with overgrown lawns. Is the world a better place because this guy probably employs someone to fluff his pillows every ten minutes? Debateable, but I bet the employee would rather fluff pillows than shovel shit in an alley or take any number of other crappy jobs.
     

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