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best way to cook steak on a regular electric stove?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by GQgeek, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. j

    j Senior member Admin

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    Fixed. That notion is likely from the 2006 pre-Christmas road trip thread in which I recommended Original Joe's as offering a good hamburger. The recommendation was seconded. But Tokyo Slim lacerated his mouth with the French bread crust of the hamburger at Joe's and lamented about the absence of salt and pepper at Tommy's Joynt. Eating anything other than a hamburger at the counter of Original Joe's is a waste of time and money.

    You gents never did report on the girls of Glide Memorial.
    __


    Haha, I had forgotten about that. I got the Joe's special as I wanted to try "the original" version of it, and it was pretty good. I can't remember which one Tommy's was now, but a couple of the places we went to eat were quirky and cool but lacking good food. No big deal, we survived.

    I don't remember anything about Glide Memorial... were we supposed to check it out? The girls in SF were generally pretty attractive and friendly compared to here, but that's all I can really report about that.
     
  2. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Senior member

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    Tokyo Slim lacerated his mouth with the French bread crust of the hamburger at Joe's and lamented about the absence of salt and pepper at Tommy's Joynt.

    Yeah, that "bread" caught me by surprise. I wasn't expecting it to be full of razor blades.
     
  3. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    I did not read every post here, so sorry if I am repeating, but here is my technique, and it's very effective: Preheat oven to 400 Preheat grill pan on stove Season the steak w/ salt, pepper, etc. Put the steak on the grill pan, for about 1-2 minutes / side Finish in oven for about 6 more minutes, depending on thickness of steak and desired doneness. OR... you could sous vide [​IMG]
     
  4. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    OR... you could sous vide [​IMG]

    This.
     
  5. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    OR, you could rip out the useless electric burners and under-plates and build a proper fire in the oven underneath and grill the steak like proper men.
     
  6. BrooklynHighpost

    BrooklynHighpost Senior member

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    I did not read every post here, so sorry if I am repeating, but here is my technique, and it's very effective:

    Preheat oven to 400
    Preheat grill pan on stove
    Season the steak w/ salt, pepper, etc.
    Put the steak on the grill pan, for about 1-2 minutes / side
    Finish in oven for about 6 more minutes, depending on thickness of steak and desired doneness.


    OR... you could sous vide [​IMG]


    What if we don't have an oven? Does cover the pan and turn to low heat as a "oven"ing option work?
     
  7. A.K.A.

    A.K.A. Senior member

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    Hi, I'm relatively new here, but I cooked two 2" thick filets this way yesterday.

    You cannot substitute a covered pan for an oven. The covered pan will cause condensation to form and your steak is then braised, not seared.

    My stove top to oven method (taken from Cook's Illustrated) for two filets - rare to med rare:

    1. Preheat oven to 425, with oven rack set to middle position.
    2. Heat heavy 10" stainless steel saute pan/skillet (cast iron is good, too) on Med. Hi for 2-4 minutes, add 2 Tbsp canola oil - heat until oil shimmers or begins to smoke.
    3. Seasoned, towel dried steaks at room temperature. Wet steaks don't sear, they just turn gray.
    4. Place in pan and don't move meat for 3-4 minutes.
    5. Turn and sear opposite side for 3-4 minutes. A nice crust should form on the meat's surface.
    6. Hold steaks together with tongs and sear circumferential sides for 30 sec to 1 min.
    7. Place face down again, and put pan in oven for 4 minutes.
    8. Remove and let rest for 15 minutes, lightly cover with foil on a warm plate.

    It makes one hell of a mess. Grease pops and spatter everywhere. If you don't have a real rangehood which drafts to the outside (I have a fairly useless pop-up downdraft), expect to fill your kitchen and any other adjacent room with smoke.

    It tastes as good as the grill. I think grill pans are BS. You can't beat an Allclad saute pan or a well seasoned cast iron skillet.
     
  8. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    I have an all-clad saute pan, and if I were cooking a fillet, I might use it b/c I might want to make a sauce. The thing about the grill pan is that it does not require oil.
     
  9. $aam

    $aam Well-Known Member

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    i literally george foreman everything
     
  10. Jericho

    Jericho New Member

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    Hi, I'm relatively new here, but I cooked two 2" thick filets this way yesterday.

    You cannot substitute a covered pan for an oven. The covered pan will cause condensation to form and your steak is then braised, not seared.

    My stove top to oven method (taken from Cook's Illustrated) for two filets - rare to med rare:

    1. Preheat oven to 425, with oven rack set to middle position.
    2. Heat heavy 10" stainless steel saute pan/skillet (cast iron is good, too) on Med. Hi for 2-4 minutes, add 2 Tbsp canola oil - heat until oil shimmers or begins to smoke.
    3. Seasoned, towel dried steaks at room temperature. Wet steaks don't sear, they just turn gray.
    4. Place in pan and don't move meat for 3-4 minutes.
    5. Turn and sear opposite side for 3-4 minutes. A nice crust should form on the meat's surface.
    6. Hold steaks together with tongs and sear circumferential sides for 30 sec to 1 min.
    7. Place face down again, and put pan in oven for 4 minutes.
    8. Remove and let rest for 15 minutes, lightly cover with foil on a warm plate.

    It makes one hell of a mess. Grease pops and spatter everywhere. If you don't have a real rangehood which drafts to the outside (I have a fairly useless pop-up downdraft), expect to fill your kitchen and any other adjacent room with smoke.

    It tastes as good as the grill. I think grill pans are BS. You can't beat an Allclad saute pan or a well seasoned cast iron skillet.


    Perfect. Thanks man. [​IMG]
    Letting it sit 5 minutes is better for me though.
     
  11. Ludeykrus

    Ludeykrus Senior member

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    Anyone ever had a problem with scorching a cast iron pan when searing meat at high temp?

    I cooked a steak and a salmon fillet a little while back, and it seemed to scorch the center where the meat sat pretty bad, looked like down to the metal. Took a bit of cooking before I could cook eggs easily in it again.
     
  12. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    Anyone ever had a problem with scorching a cast iron pan when searing meat at high temp?

    I cooked a steak and a salmon fillet a little while back, and it seemed to scorch the center where the meat sat pretty bad, looked like down to the metal. Took a bit of cooking before I could cook eggs easily in it again.


    What oil did you use? You need something with a high smoking point, like canola, grapeseed or safflower oil. Also, you can cook on high heat for a shorter period of time and finish in the oven.
     
  13. shasta

    shasta Senior member

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    intriguing read - i have tried to use my cast iron pan several times in my apartment (its square shaped with grill ridges) that i have carefully seasoned per imstructions with crisco in an oven several times, but all i seem to end up with is a smoking, sticky mess that i cant even get the meat to release cleanly from. what am i missing? i cant stink/smoke up the place like this anymore - can cast iron be used with little to no smoke?
     
  14. Ludeykrus

    Ludeykrus Senior member

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    North Georgia
    What oil did you use? You need something with a high smoking point, like canola, grapeseed or safflower oil. Also, you can cook on high heat for a shorter period of time and finish in the oven.

    Canola. I'm not a fan of the oven, mostly because I tend to set things on fire in it.

    I cooked the steak perfectly at max temp on the electric burner. Canola oil worked decently, the entire apartment was smoked out, but the steak crusted and released well. Problem was where the steak sat, it took all of the non-stick properties along with it.
     
  15. ShirazAddict

    ShirazAddict Active Member

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    I'm in the food & wine business, and after 10 years of eating & cooking my way around the world, here is my method for producing the best home-cooked steak.
    1. Buy 15-30 day, dry-aged, NY Strips, or Ribeye, from Bryan's Fine Foods in Corte Madera: http://www.bryansfinefoods.com/ . I'm not going to argue about Lobels or heaven forbid Omaha or whatever crap you can buy at Costco. If you are serious about steak, and want the very best, Bryan's Private Reserve aged steaks are where it is at. If you are wanting filet, get it from anywhere as frankly once you get to prime in filet, the differences are minimal & I find it doesn't work well for my method of steak preparation---though Bryan's filet tails are ridiculously good for an appetizer while you cook your steak.
    2. Let the steaks come to room temp.
    3. Heat up your oven, or preferably an outdoor grill, to 375-400 degrees.
    4. Put your seasoned cast iron skillet in the oven to get hot. You'll need 1 skillet for every 2 N.Y. strips.
    5. Turn on your burners, again preferably outdoors as you are about to generate a crap-load of smoke, as high as they will go.
    6. Move the skillets from the oven to the burners. Let them get as hot as possible.
    7. Once the skillets are as hot as possible, quickly season the steaks on both sides with your preferred salt & pepper seasoning. Personally I prefer McCormicks Montreal Seasoning as it is pretty basic & simple + avail nationwide. DO NOT USE OIL OR EVEN WORSE BUTTER! OIL BURNS & AFFECTS THE FLAVOR OF THE STEAK!
    8. Gently lay the steaks on the skillets. Leave them alone for 2-3 minutes, depending on how much char you want.
    9. Turn them over once, using tongs. Leave them on the skillet on the buner for about 1 minute, then quickly move the skillet into the grill/oven at 375 degrees.
    10. Don't do anything else.
    11. 3-4 minutes in the oven = rare. 4-6 = medium rare. 6-7 = medium.....and frankly overcooked. Do not cut into the steak to check done-ness---learn to use the touch method to determine wellness.
    12. Immediately plate the steaks right out of the oven, again using the tongs. Do not cover them with aluminium foil.
    13. If you prefer a bit of xtra richness, Whole Foods has a very nice butter-Blu Cheese or butter-Gorgonzola mix that works well---apply a small pat/smear of this over the top of your steak---thin is the key---you don't want it swimming in it. You could also use clarified butter or ghee. Do not use bacon fat or duck fat---it overwhelms the taste of the steak.
    14. Let the steak rest for at least 10 minutes.
    15. Eat & enjoy.

    If you must have grill marks on your steak, the preferred method is to remove it from the skillet using tongs & put it on the grill for 1-2 minutes before removing. I'm not a fan of grill skillets as they don't seem to sear as well.

    This method is fairly foolproof, and most importantly aside from some ribeyes or porterhouses, the chances of flame-ups are pretty low---I have two 20k btu outdoor burners that I use to heat the skillets & occasionally I will get some scattered flames during the searing portion of the procedure, but I've never had a flare-up once the skillet goes into the grill---a real problem when cooking ribeyes due to the high fat content.
     
  16. Working Stiff

    Working Stiff Senior member

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    I do not trust people who cook thier steaks in the oven.

    Get your cast iron pan very hot. Sear the steak on both sides, adding a generous amount of course salt to the raw side before flipping. It should be well browned on both sides and raw in the middle. Slice, add more salt, and eat.

    Steak should be 2 inches thick.
     

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