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best way to cook steak on a regular electric stove?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by GQgeek, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Kobe / Wagyu is marbled, in fact extremely so. The difference is that it is marbled throughout with the tiniest flecks of fat very equally distributed. American beef is generally marbled with thicker more prominent streaks of fat. While a 300 gram portion of each may contain the same amount of fat, the smaller more dispersed marbling of the Kobe allows the fat to soften during quick cooking and distribute into the meat, also melting in the mouth

    Result is a very tender steak. Without larger globs of fat in certain places

    K


    Sounds interesting. The texture of fat makes me gag. You're saying I could bite in to a kobe steak and not feel that sensation? I'm usually a filet mignon or a trim-off all the fat with a scalpel kinda guy.
     
  2. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    Sounds interesting. The texture of fat makes me gag. You're saying I could bite in to a kobe steak and not feel that sensation? I'm usually a filet mignon or a trim-off all the fat with a scalpel kinda guy.

    Another thing about Kobe is that the fat is of a different type. More unsaturated or something. I dont know the exact fat content / distributon. Basically, it is so light that it even starts to break down at room temperature. Chefs cannot keep it in warm parts of a kitchen as the fat will melt prematurely.

    That fat consitency along with the very fine marbling makes a steak that does not taste fatty at all. I do recommend you try it. Kobe if you can get it, or Wagyu at least. If done right, it will slaughter a good filet. That said, it can also be done wrong. See my comment above on Kobe steak sandwiches and hamburgers. The name is becoming overextended, and you are ending up with alot of subpar dishes being branded Kobe.

    K
     
  3. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    Sounds interesting. The texture of fat makes me gag. You're saying I could bite in to a kobe steak and not feel that sensation? I'm usually a filet mignon or a trim-off all the fat with a scalpel kinda guy.

    I don't like chewing on chunks of fat. Well marbled, dry aged meat is good because the fat becomes absorbed into the denser flesh during grilling so you get the flavour without that disgusting gag inducing fat problem.

    That being said, my two favourite cuts are probably filet mignon and Striploin. Filet mignon is good because it's essentially a muscle lining the spine of the animal, which because of not much use, is very tender and pretty lean I suppose (which is why some places wrap it in bacon).

    I agree about terrible supermarket steak... in Montreal the quality of beef is abysmal. The best you can get here is like a little 200g piece of dog meat that costs you $10 and is totally useless. When I make beef for myself here, I usually just make a roast.
     
  4. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    I can't believe there's no place in montreal to buy good meat. The restaurants have to get it from somewhere. My sister knows the chefs from Bronte and Europea so i'll ask where they get their meat. I'm sure that if you make a large enough order you can get it delivered from a commercial supplier.
     
  5. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    I can't believe there's no place in montreal to buy good meat. The restaurants have to get it from somewhere. My sister knows the chefs from Bronte and Europea so i'll ask where they get their meat. I'm sure that if you make a large enough order you can get it delivered from a commercial supplier.

    Provigo and Metro have a higher grade of dog meat. I think there might be some jewish delis on St. Laurent that are good... but that's a bit out of the way.

    Ask Queue de Cheval where they get their steak.
     
  6. bigbadbuff

    bigbadbuff Senior member

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    Short loin tenderloin (ie Filet Mignon) is actually one of the higher fat content cuts you can get. I swear. Someone will link with confirmation, I'm sure of it...
     
  7. Histrion

    Histrion Senior member

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    As for meat in MontrÃ[​IMG]al, perhaps there are farmers selling their own meat in the markets? I know that in QuÃ[​IMG]bec City, at the MarchÃ[​IMG] du Vieux-Port, there is a guy selling his own biological beef. I once bought some of it, and it was quite good.
     
  8. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Provigo and Metro have a higher grade of dog meat. I think there might be some jewish delis on St. Laurent that are good... but that's a bit out of the way.

    Ask Queue de Cheval where they get their steak.


    I doubt they'd tell you because you can actually buy your steaks from Queue de Cheval, but that's a bit overkill cause they naturally mark it up more than if you got it from a good butcher.
     
  9. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    I doubt they'd tell you because you can actually buy your steaks from Queue de Cheval, but that's a bit overkill cause they naturally mark it up more than if you got it from a good butcher.

    Well i'm sure if you get to know a waiter it's possible.
     
  10. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    So I did my first steak on my new lodge pan last night, what a difference! I got grill marks and everything. It actually looked like a steak prepared in a restaurant. Kudos to Stax for the recommendation.
     
  11. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    I use my Lodge more than all my All-Clad pans combined. Cast iron is truly what God would cook with -- well, other than His laser vision eye beam.
     
  12. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Oh and the smoke was really bad... Does this mean it was perhaps too hot? The oil was smoking before I put the steak on but after I put the steak on smoke filled the apartment pretty quickly (almost like a fog machine). The steak was still a lot better than on my old pan but I think I can do better. Oh and I was using canola oil. I'm thinking it was too hot so I'll try it at a lower temp tonight.
     
  13. Arethusa

    Arethusa Senior member

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    Yeah, too hot. Canola's smoke point is extremely high, and even for searing, you don't need that much heat.
     
  14. countdemoney

    countdemoney Senior member

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    Real Japanese Kobe is still illegal in the US, but I'm not sure about Canada.

    I had real Kobe on my last trip to Hong Kong. I'm also a very lean meat, cut off all the fat guy and was concerned when I saw that marbled monster. No need for the concern.

    It's definitiely a different kind of fat and it's definitely fantastic beef. We had it in a Japanese restaurant and they sliced it thin and then seared. Really, really good. Definitely no "fatty" taste. I found that I didn't mind the smaller portions, because the beef is very good. I'd say the same for home use. I couldn't imagine eating more than 6oz in one sitting.

    You can buy wagyu online if your butcher doesn't carry it.
     
  15. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    So I did my first steak on my new lodge pan last night, what a difference! I got grill marks and everything. It actually looked like a steak prepared in a restaurant. Kudos to Stax for the recommendation.

    happy to help.
     
  16. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    Those who are interested in Wagyu and ever stop by Tokyo, I recommend Imahan, it's a chain with several locations around Tokyo that does Wagyu sukiyaki and steaks. Reasonable prices for what it is, as in 5000Y-10,000Y a head. The beef literally melts in your mouth. I ate at the one in Shinjuku Takashimaya Times Square (9F or 10F? forgot) and it was probably the best beef experience in my life and will be going back shortly.

    I really really want one of those Lodge pans.
     
  17. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    Real Japanese Kobe is still illegal in the US,

    Really? What's the rationale?
     
  18. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    Really? What's the rationale?

    mad cow disease import bans
     
  19. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    <Slaps head with hand> I knew that, for some reason I was not thinking of Kobe as BEEF, go figure.

    Regards,
    Huntsman
     
  20. Arethusa

    Arethusa Senior member

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    A bit back towards the original topic, are there any particular cuts you guys find work better than others when pan frying and finishing in the oven?

    [edit]

    Well, that's an unimpressive thousandth post.
     

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