Best Scotch Whisky 15 Years and Under

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Augusto86, Aug 27, 2007.

  1. cocostella

    cocostella Senior member

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    Oban and Macallan will see you to the light grasshopper.
     


  2. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    As others have said, Cragganmore makes an excellent single-malt.
    I also quite like Lagavulin.

    From memory - actually something my wife told me years ago, as she's more of a single-malt enthusiast than am I - there are six "classic" single-malt distilleries in Scotland. I just asked my wife again and she said that they are: Glenkinchie, Dalwhinnie, Cragganmore, Lagavulin, Oban and Talisker.
     


  3. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    From memory - actually something my wife told me years ago, as she's more of a single-malt enthusiast than am I - there are six "classic" single-malt distilleries in Scotland. I just asked my wife again and she said that they are: Glenkinchie, Dalwhinnie, Cragganmore, Lagavulin, Oban and Talisker.

    The Classic Malts are a creation of the Diageo marketing machine. Don't get me wrong: they're all good, but it's not as if they have traditionally been recognized as the outstanding examples of their respective styles.

    In response to the original poster, there is a tremendous variety in Scotch, probably more variety than any other type of whisk(e)y. It's impossible to pick "the best" except in reference to your own preferences.
     


  4. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Johnny Walker Black. All you need.
     


  5. dkzzzz

    dkzzzz Senior member

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    As an side question, what's the absolute easiest to drink whiskey/scotch out there? I'd like to acquire a taste for it, but I think I need to start gradually as I don't really drink liquor. A recommended drinking method (ice? a little water? what kind of glass?) would be appreciated as well.

    For single malt : Oban on ice. Let it sit for a few minutes.
    For mixed: Johnny Walker red or black
     


  6. nioh

    nioh Senior member

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    Ardbeg, Lagavulin, Laphroaig Cask Strength.

    Spot on!

    Add Oban to that list and it's more or less complete.
     


  7. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

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    I love Ardbeg, and just picked up a Gordon & McPhail Connoisseur's Choice 10 year-old Ardbeg which seems a bit warmer and smoother than the usual Ardbeg. Ardbeg's very peaty but the tastes are less harsh than a Laphroaig, which I also like. It's not a bad Scotch to try if you're new to Islay malts.
     


  8. Smokey

    Smokey Member

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    I love Ardbeg, and just picked up a Gordon & McPhail Connoisseur's Choice 10 year-old Ardbeg which seems a bit warmer and smoother than the usual Ardbeg. Ardbeg's very peaty but the tastes are less harsh than a Laphroaig, which I also like. It's not a bad Scotch to try if you're new to Islay malts.
    I think Ardbeg 10 gets my bang for the buck vote as well.
     


  9. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    [​IMG]
    I really love Laphroig, both the 15 and the bargain priced 10.

    Seconded. Also, Macallan, particularly the cask strength.

    I'm a dissenter on Cragganmore. I've always found it fairly bland, and I (as evidenced by my preference for Laphroig), prefer stronger, more distinctive tastes. Lagavulin's a good suggestion, too.

    I respectfully disagree with Piobaire. If you're going to develop a taste for Scotch, you don't want to use mixed drinks. That would be like trying to develop a taste for wine by drinking Sangria. It may be perfectly pleasant, but you're going to lose in the mix the subtleties that draw people to it and that distinguish the various brands/styles.

    I prefer mine with just a tiny bit of water; you can experiment to taste. I started out drinking it on the rocks, but over time moved away from that because I wanted more control over the amount of water (and, obviously, the level of water in your scotch is going to change significantly as ice melts).
     


  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    I respectfully disagree with Piobaire. If you're going to develop a taste for Scotch, you don't want to use mixed drinks. That would be like trying to develop a taste for wine by drinking Sangria. It may be perfectly pleasant, but you're going to lose in the mix the subtleties that draw people to it and that distinguish the various brands/styles.

    I prefer mine with just a tiny bit of water; you can experiment to taste. I started out drinking it on the rocks, but over time moved away from that because I wanted more control over the amount of water (and, obviously, the level of water in your scotch is going to change significantly as ice melts).


    I see what you are saying. It seemed the person asking the question though was basically just not a hard liquor person to start off with, so I thought of the manhattan (a rusty nail would work too) as a way to come as close to straight hard liquor as possible, i.e. not mix it with soda, fruit juice, etc. Diluting it with water would work too but my idea was just to get someone used to drinking a strong drink, i.e. whisky + vermouth, then work your way up to straight Scotch.

    Oh, another Scotch to look at, IMO, is Bunnahabin <sp?>. It is an Islay but the water used flows out of hard rock, so not too peaty or iodiney. I am not a fan of either of those being heavy (hence why I like Speysides).
     


  11. Brian278

    Brian278 Senior member

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    I see what you are saying. It seemed the person asking the question though was basically just not a hard liquor person to start off with, so I thought of the manhattan (a rusty nail would work too) as a way to come as close to straight hard liquor as possible, i.e. not mix it with soda, fruit juice, etc. Diluting it with water would work too but my idea was just to get someone used to drinking a strong drink, i.e. whisky + vermouth, then work your way up to straight Scotch.
    The Manhattan suggestion was appreciated. As of now, drinking straight scotch even on the rocks isn't really doable as I get a mild gag reflex with almost every sip.
     


  12. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    Johnny Walker Black. All you need.

    Philistine.
     


  13. life_interrupts

    life_interrupts Senior member

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    I've really began to love scotch - but I don't have the money to go sampling all the different malts and hating some of them. I like Glenlivet and Bowmore - but I want to try some other ones. Any suggestions?
    Recently got a MacCallan 10 year as a gift. And to my surprise, I really liked it. I also like Dalmore Cigar Malt (a 10 year, also). Glenmorangie 12 year is tasty, too.
     


  14. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Philistine.

    12 years old. Blended from many of the malts praised here. Always consistently excellently good. The only Scotch anyone needs.
     


  15. thepataphysician

    thepataphysician Senior member

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    Manton, I agree with you. a lot of the singlemalts taste unbalanced to me, akin to the american &quot; lets cram as much hops as possible&quot; style of beer. But, I would rather be drinking a manhattan anyway
     


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