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Best pudding?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by DocHolliday, Sep 13, 2006.

  1. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    yeah, like odoreater, i'm forced to eat this out of those tiny pre -made containers. It's sad in a pre-fabricated kind of way.

    Anybody remember those funky choclate flavored Pillsbury? "space sticks" They were in foil and went up with the Apollo space missions? Later a version was sold to little kids like me....parents would recoil in horror now.
    They were definately in that "odd but good" food category.

    I don't remember them, but I'm sure they went well with Tang.
     
  2. Aus_MD

    Aus_MD Senior member

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    Pudding is the manhood.
     
  3. designprofessor

    designprofessor Senior member

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    I don't remember them, but I'm sure they went well with Tang.

    aaahhh,,yyyess, TANG *nostalgic moment*
     
  4. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    Bread!!!!

    Nice one, BTW, Kent.

    ~ Huntsman
     
  5. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    J, Yorkshire pudding can be finnicky to make, but their smaller cousin, popovers, is an absolute snap:

    1 cup reg AP flour
    1/4 tsp fine Salt
    2 Tab. Sugar
    1 Tab. melted butter
    1 cup milk
    2 large eggs, beaten

    Sift and measure flour into a bowl. Add remaining dry ingrediants and mix. Add wet ingrediants, butter last, and whisk to combine. Whisk only to thoroughly combine -- overwhisking will kill the puff. Grease a muffin tin (beef fat is traditional -- a must if you have a ribroast, otherwise Crisco is fine), fill cups 1/3-1/2 full, and bake in a preheated 375F oven for 50-55 minutes. Do not even open the over door for 45min. Avoid calisthenics in the kitchen during cooking time. Remove when quite browned and divine-looking.

    There are all sorts of variants, mainly exceptionally finnicky ones requiring ultra-high smoke point oils and preheating the pan to 400F before adding the batter, and while they are marginal improvements, this is easy and elegant.

    ~ Huntsman
     
  6. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Senior member

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    yeah, like odoreater, i'm forced to eat this out of those tiny pre -made containers. It's sad in a pre-fabricated kind of way.

    Anybody remember those funky choclate flavored Pillsbury? "space sticks" They were in foil and went up with the Apollo space missions? Later a version was sold to little kids like me....parents would recoil in horror now.
    They were definately in that "odd but good" food category.


    Good lord, what a blast from the past. They also had peanutbutter. I remember munching on these as a kid. They didn't stay on the market long, which wasn't surprising, considering that they tasted very artificial, even to a young kid. I could never quite decide whether I liked those things or not, but you could sure pretend you were an astronaut if you ate them while looking up through the window from the luggage space behind the back seat of the Volkswagen.
     
  7. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Senior member

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    J, Yorkshire pudding can be finnicky to make, but their smaller cousin, popovers, is an absolute snap:

    1 cup reg AP flour
    1/4 tsp fine Salt
    2 Tab. Sugar
    1 Tab. melted butter
    1 cup milk
    2 large eggs, beaten

    Sift and measure flour into a bowl. Add remaining dry ingrediants and mix. Add wet ingrediants, butter last, and whisk to combine. Whisk only to thoroughly combine -- overwhisking will kill the puff. Grease a muffin tin (beef fat is traditional -- a must if you have a ribroast, otherwise Crisco is fine), fill cups 1/3-1/2 full, and bake in a preheated 375F oven for 50-55 minutes. Do not even open the over door for 45min. Avoid calisthenics in the kitchen during cooking time. Remove when quite browned and divine-looking.

    There are all sorts of variants, mainly exceptionally finnicky ones requiring ultra-high smoke point oils and preheating the pan to 400F before adding the batter, and while they are marginal improvements, this is easy and elegant.

    ~ Huntsman


    One other note about making popovers: they'll pop best if you use a cast iron popover pan. Muffin tins and the like just don't pack enough punch to make them pop.

    Huntsman, I should have guessed that you'd know what Yorkshire pudding is. It's part of my family's traditional Christmas dinner with roast beef.
     
  8. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    One other note about making popovers: they'll pop best if you use a cast iron popover pan. Muffin tins and the like just don't pack enough punch to make them pop.

    True! But you can still get quite a decent rendition from a muffin tin, especially with a good oven. Popover pans are like hen's teeth.

    Huntsman, I should have guessed that you'd know what Yorkshire pudding is. It's part of my family's traditional Christmas dinner with roast beef.

    Naturally. La dolce vita and all that jazz. [​IMG] English family?

    ~ Huntsman
     
  9. designprofessor

    designprofessor Senior member

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    Good lord, what a blast from the past. They also had peanutbutter. I remember munching on these as a kid. They didn't stay on the market long, which wasn't surprising, considering that they tasted very artificial, even to a young kid. I could never quite decide whether I liked those things or not, but you could sure pretend you were an astronaut if you ate them while looking up through the window from the luggage space behind the back seat of the Volkswagen.

    Yes! Mine was the appliance size cardboard box, a.k.a. spaceship. You know, if you have a chocolate Powerbar, the taste is similar[​IMG]
     
  10. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Senior member

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    Yes! Mine was the appliance size cardboard box, a.k.a. spaceship. You know, if you have a chocolate Powerbar, the taste is similar[​IMG]

    The taste may be similar, but the texture is completely different. I'm not quite sure what to compare it to.

    Those space bars seem to have disappeared from the market in about 1970 and I haven't ever heard anybody mention them since . . . until now.
     
  11. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    Who knew rice pudding had such a following? Perhaps I should follow this up with a "Rice pudding: Raisins vs. no raisins" poll. I like nuts, but no raisins.

    I take mine with no raisins, but with a generous amount of cinnamon in it.
     
  12. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I take mine with no raisins, but with a generous amount of cinnamon in it.

    I agree. I particularly like a nice dusting of cinnamon on top, so that there's a contrast of flavors between the layers. Toss a few walnut bits on there ... possibly the world's best dessert.
     
  13. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Senior member

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    In India, there's a dessert called firni that is a sort of rice pudding with a dusting of pistachio bits on top. It's amazingly good.
     
  14. denimdestroyedmylife

    denimdestroyedmylife Senior member

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    Yummmmm..... Kheer is delicious--------rice pudding, India-style; what could be better?
     
  15. Nonk

    Nonk Senior member

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    I am another fan of bread and butter pudding, must have raisins though.

    Rhubarb crumble is another favourite.Apple pie must have cloves and cinnamon.


    I enjoy both Yorkshire pudding and black pudding.
     
  16. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Senior member

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    Nobody's mentioned figgy pudding or plum pudding, which are traditional Christmas specialties. They are served with hard sauce, which is basically a simple mixture of butter and sugar beaten together.
     
  17. denimdestroyedmylife

    denimdestroyedmylife Senior member

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    Jell-o Pudding Pops [​IMG] Have they been revived yet? [​IMG]
     
  18. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    isn't there a pudding made out of blood? never had it, anyone have?
     
  19. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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  20. designprofessor

    designprofessor Senior member

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