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Best cocktail or bartending books?

impolyt_one

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A lot of them are rather unfortunate; a lot of the older Japanese cocktails from before the bubble era taste like punch or something. The Million Dollar, as invented by the bartender at the Grand Hotel in Yokohama, would be one. The Pure Love, another. I can't remember off the top of my head, or even what goes into those things. For novelty, they are fun to try once.
The standby western cocktails though, the Japanese are definitely adept at.
 

MetroStyles

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Originally Posted by impolyt_one
Huntsman: ever been to Tokyo, or even Angel's Share in Manhattan? The Japanese truly obey traditional cocktail culture.

I have a Japanese bar I go to locally here in Korea as a local outpost of some Ginza place, they have a jawdropping single malt selection, as well as an internationally competitive bartender. They have a pretty extensive cocktail menu, to include a lot of the Japanese cocktail inventions of the 1960s-1980's and they even list the origin and inventor of the drinks, and to which contests the drinks have been taken. Still, and it's pretty a good little bar with $20-$50+ drinks, it pales in comparison to a real Japanese cocktail bar IN Japan, they're on a level that is rarely if ever seen in America anymore. Hand carved iceballs for scotch, exacting precision and mixing techniques, really thoughtful stuff. Even the bar snacks in Japan are taken very, very seriously. I read some article about a bartender who made his own Jamon in Akita-ken because he felt real Jamon was too salty to pair with single malt scotch.


Yeah, see while this is kind of cool in a quaint way, I think it takes drinking alcohol way too far. But that's just me.
 

rk9

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If you like Tiki drinks then check out http://www.painkillernyc.com/

It's the website of a Tiki cocktail bar in NYC that is worth a visit. Interestingly they put all of their recipes online in case you want to attempt the same. I have tried and it's worked out well. Even made some homemade orgeat for Mai Tais.
 

bullrams

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Don't know what books did the guys there read, but Devil's Acre's 'Call a Treuse' in San Francisco has inspired me to peruse cocktails.

There is so much information to process in these threads - great recs all around!

Thanks for sharing!
 

Cark

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Huntsman: ever been to Tokyo, or even Angel's Share in Manhattan? The Japanese truly obey traditional cocktail culture.

I have a Japanese bar I go to locally here in Korea as a local outpost of some Ginza place, they have a jawdropping single malt selection, as well as an internationally competitive bartender. They have a pretty extensive cocktail menu, to include a lot of the Japanese cocktail inventions of the 1960s-1980's and they even list the origin and inventor of the drinks, and to which contests the drinks have been taken. Still, and it's pretty a good little bar with $20-$50+ drinks, it pales in comparison to a real Japanese cocktail bar IN Japan, they're on a level that is rarely if ever seen in America anymore. Hand carved iceballs for scotch, exacting precision and mixing techniques, really thoughtful stuff. Even the bar snacks in Japan are taken very, very seriously. I read some article about a bartender who made his own Jamon in Akita-ken because he felt real Jamon was too salty to pair with single malt scotch.


Yeah, see while this is kind of cool in a quaint way, I think it takes drinking alcohol way too far. But that's just me.
i just drink my liquor neat, that is the best way to drink it, all these fancy yancy boy techniques for fetishing alcoholic drinks are for snowflakes.
 

Cark

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You

You’re an idiot.
I am going to have to disagree with you. My way to drink is best, better than any cocktail, liquor is best drunk neat. Unless it is low quality, then sure, go add some sugar water to it to make it drinkable. You might as well have a $1 can of pop instead.
 

Bhowie

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I am going to have to disagree with you. My way to drink is best, better than any cocktail, liquor is best drunk neat. Unless it is low quality, then sure, go add some sugar water to it to make it drinkable. You might as well have a $1 can of pop instead.
AD2D5E66-C68C-48A1-9E3F-BD3036F4C250.gif
 

Cark

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due to the diabetes epidemic in the states it is not surprising you would prefer a juice (with a splash of liquor) instead of a real drink. go enjoy your alcoholic fruit juice you fancy boy, it will tickle your dainty tastebuds lol.
 

Ambulance Chaser

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I'm looking for some new recommendations. The problem with a lot of well-regarded cocktail books is that they're not written with the home bartender in mind: The recipes call for exotic bottles and homemade infusions that I don't have the money to buy, space to store, and time to make. So I'd like books with recipes containing fewer, more basic ingredients. Based on my research, Regarding Cocktails by Sasha Petraske and 3-Ingredient Cocktails by Robert Simonson seem to be up my alley. Any experience with these books or other books I should look into?
 

dylanturner

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You don't need to go to a fancy cocktail bar to have a great drink. These books will show you how to whip up some of the the tastiest and prettiest cocktails you've ever seen, perfect for impressing your friends at your next holiday party.
 

tropics

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I'm looking for some new recommendations. The problem with a lot of well-regarded cocktail books is that they're not written with the home bartender in mind: The recipes call for exotic bottles and homemade infusions that I don't have the money to buy, space to store, and time to make. So I'd like books with recipes containing fewer, more basic ingredients. Based on my research, Regarding Cocktails by Sasha Petraske and 3-Ingredient Cocktails by Robert Simonson seem to be up my alley. Any experience with these books or other books I should look into?
3 ingredient cocktails is great. I have a ton of cocktail books but I find myself reaching for this very frequently .
 

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