Best bespoke commission ever? I think so. *** PICTURES ADDED FOR THOSE LACKING IMAGINATION

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by mafoofan, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    I understand that. But I think you can very safely distinguish between modifying the lines of a cut from adding features, details, lines, etc. that were never there to begin with. Also, to be clear, I would never object to using a tailor merely because he displays a few "signature" things I don't like. Taub's work looks really great--I just don't like the back yoke.
     


  2. Cravate_Noire

    Cravate_Noire Senior member

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    He himself pronounces his name in [kind of] French, that says a lot! Jokes aside, he has an excellent reputation, especially for someone being that 'young'.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013


  3. Lovelace

    Lovelace Senior member

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    The evolution of tailored clothing isn't just a matter of modifying lines though, it also includes both the addition and deletion of features.

    We'd still be wearing frock coats if this wasn't the case.
     


  4. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    And as a client, one must discriminate between such "features" that are meaningful improvements and those that will appear silly after a few months or years of use. For reasons already discussed, I don't like Taub's back yoke detail because I think it is much more the latter than the former.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013


  5. Eustace Tilley

    Eustace Tilley Senior member

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    +1 - I was tempted to try Gieves solely because of Taube's presence. Luckily for my wallet, he doesn't travel across the Atlantic.
     


  6. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    I'm not sure why we're looking at it as anything more than a design detail. Though I enjoy classic tailored clothing, some people want a bit more edge to their style. Anything else will be boring to them right out of the box, let alone a few months or years from now.

    More of Taub's work, taken from a friend's blog.

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    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013


  7. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    excellent
     


  8. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Have to say, that doesn't make me like Taub's work any more.

    I think when it comes to the realm of classic men's clothing, it is always important to question these sorts of newfangled "design details." After all, what is the reason for dressing the way we do, as opposed to they way they do over on SW&D? Is it really just because we like things to be "made better?" Then what's with all the suits and ties?

    I like classic men's clothing because it is a highly developed language. You can say a lot with it so long as you learn how to use the words. Thus, adding to the vocabulary should never be taken lightly.
     


  9. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    I like classic clothing because I like the look, but I can't say it's any different than why someone else likes another aesthetic. To me, this is like arguing whether or not jazz is better than classical or something. Some people like some music, others like other kinds of music. And each form will have its own rules and principles. I agree Taub is adding stuff that shouldn't be added in classic clothing, but he's also not working with that spirit in mind.

    I think I've said this elsewhere, but I also like his stuff even if I personally wouldn't wear it, just as I like art that I personally wouldn't want hung in my house.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013


  10. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    Social convention and because they like the clothes?

    You are one of the least costume-y people on this forum. For you, that means fastidious dedication to conservative clothing; you wear what you like. For others it means wearing nice stuff with nice design.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013


  11. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    The only thing preventing me from putting any art I like in my house is that I cannot afford it. :)

    You have successfully distinguished between two different viewpoints: (1) one way of dress is better than another (at least in some particular ways), and (2) all ways of dress are equally valid, so it just a matter of subjective preference. However, that doesn't settle which is closer to the truth. No one can ever prove one over the other, but as with so many other similar situations, I choose to act as if the former is true. I'd rather always be hunting to improve, even when I must commit to educated guesses, than simply settle on a world where everything is different in meaningless ways.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013


  12. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    I mean this in all sincerity: that's maybe the highest praise you could give me! Thank you.
     


  13. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    It's not about the validity of a certain method of dress, it's about doing what you do well.
     


  14. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

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    Cashmere lining? Aggressive. Reckless? I've found the lining of my overcoats to be the thing most prone to wearing out, out of my whole wardrobe. Cashmere is not a hard-wearing fabric. Good cashmere wears much better than bad cashmere, but still...

    In my (cashmere) Loro Piana coat, the lining is 85% cotton, 15% cashmere, and I'm glad it's that mix vs. 100% cashmere, because I'd worry about wearing it out.

    Good luck!

    P.S. And cashmere is not slick - A lot of friction on the lining as you put the coat on and take it off...
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013


  15. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    I really like Goya, but there's no way I would want one of his creepier pieces in my hallway.
     


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