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Bespoke VS. Brioni

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by oldskool, Mar 18, 2005.

  1. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Well-Known Member

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    My respect for the Foxx has disappeared [​IMG] Foxx, how can you claim this if you've never had a bespoke suit.? For what it's worth, I agree with Foxx that Brioni's tailors are absolutely superb (despite the fact that I'm not a huge fan of Brioni style). My tailor, when I asked whether he thinks Brioni or Kiton makes the better product, said Brioni. Overall, you'd be hard pressed to find a tailor who could make a Brioni quality suit, and even far fewer who could make a Brioni quality suit that is a carbon copy of Brioni styling. The catch is that you may find that a good bespoke tailor can make certain stylistic decisions that are actually an improvement on Brioni for your particular body. The biggest draw for bespoke though is that you get total control over the process (or, almost total control). That is part of the benefit and also part of the pleasure. As one who has mulled over the decision of whether to try a bespoke suit or be able to get two super high quality (i.e. Oxxford, Isaia) suits at discount for the same price, I can tell you that the only reason I'm going with the former is because I know that the experience of working with the tailor will be worth a few hundred dollars itself to me. I like the craft.
     
  2. lisapop

    lisapop Well-Known Member

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    johnnynorman, if you, like me, enjoy watching the art and craft of custom tailoring, make sure the tailor you select actually creates the clothes in his shop and does not outsource the garment to a factory, which would negate the whole experience.
    Grayson
     
  3. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Well-Known Member

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    My tailor does everything in house -- he even refuses to shirts for the sole reason that he would have to outsource. I've personally seen him stitching buttonholes and doing the canvas on suits before.
     
  4. lisapop

    lisapop Well-Known Member

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    Excellent. Sounds like he's "tailor made" for you. Such old-school tailors are a fast-declining breed.
    Grayson
     
  5. marc37

    marc37 Well-Known Member

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    (RJMan @ Mar. 18 2005,10:31) Shark-fin collar, maybe?
    Are the front edges curved? Â That's a shark-fin collar. Â I don't like those, either.
    What on earth is a shark-fin collar??? Could someone provide a picture. Great topic btw.
     
  6. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Well-Known Member

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    I have asked this too, but sort of posed the question differently. Assuming you can get top RTW - Kiton, Brioni, Zegna Couture - for around $1500 on sale or online, is it preferable to purchase those or some cheaper MTM (Hickey, Polo) or Asian bespoke. The question, ultimately, turns on the question of what is more important - fit or quality of construction. My conclusion, and the conclusion of many others, is that fit is far more important than how much handwork went into the garment. Having the best of both worlds - perfect fit and impeccable construction - is obviously the supreme yet elusive ideal. But if you have to compromise, I say always choose bespoke or MTM over expensive RTW. You simply look better and feel better.
     
  7. naturlaut

    naturlaut Well-Known Member

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    As I might have mentioned this before, I think buying RTW and bespoke are two different stages in a gentleman's sartorial conquest.  One cannot start off his life on Savile Row without knowing what he wants.  At this stage, he will rely on the Brionis and Kitons of the market, as I once did.  The merits of having been 'educated' by these RTW is invaluable, as they will teach you how to identity the basics of good tailoring --- buttonholes, pick-stitching, horse hair canvass, shoulder pads, etc., just to name a few points.  Ultimately, if he is determined to improve his wardrobe, he will begin to notice the inadequacies of RTW.  He will then seek out his other option --- bespoke tailoring.  Armed with the basic knowledge of the tailoring art, he will now be able to communicate with this tailor on matters of styling, personalization, craftsmanship and other minor details.  This will, no doubt, be another long journey, but it is one journey that he will enjoy for the rest of his life.  

    To decide whether to purchase Brioni or have a suit bespoken for you, you need to know where you are on the sartorial conquest.  If you are a newbie, chances are, even at the hands of Mr. Hitchcock or Mr. Beaman (or for that matter, Mr. Kabbaz), you will have completely no idea what they've just made for you --- and to the dismay of the craftsman, you are not yet equipped to enjoy their creation, not to mention your possible dissatisfaction of the final product, as it may not be what you are aiming for.  On the other hand, if you have had quite a handful of Brionis and Kitons already sitting in your wardrobe, my humble advise is, move on to bespoke tailoring, even if it is just a local artisan.  The first one or two suits may not be entirely satisfactory, but thereafter, oh what more can I say: the endless selection of cloths, the communication with the artist/craftsman, the inexhaustible imagination, and the final work of art --- note: art is not represented by its monetary value, whether it costs $10,000 or a mere $1000, if the suit fits perfectly and the craftmanship superb, it is a work of art.  A bespoke suit is made for and belongs to you.  An off-the-rack suit belongs to the rack.

    JMHO.
     
  8. The_Foxx

    The_Foxx Well-Known Member

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    Northern VA, USA
    johnnynorman--

    huh? i thought I lost your respect a long time ago, when you learned I like to wear one jacket sleeve button undone..
     

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