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Bespoke Suit Tips Before Meeting Tailor?

garthbernstein

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I am scheduled to meet Riccardo Verolo of Sartoria Lemmi in Italy, what suggestions do you have for preparing for the meeting? I know I want a tan/off white linen suit, and can choose the basics in advance, but do you have a process/tips that help you get the absolute most out of the bespoke process?
 

dieworkwear

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Stand naturally when being measured and fitted. Bespoke clothes are meant to fit not only your body's measurements but also your natural posture.

I also recommend going with a slightly heavier fabric. Lightweight linens can wrinkle in an unpleasing way -- sort of like Kleenex tissue. Whereas heavy linens rumple more than wrinkle.

Lastly, if this is your first bespoke suit and/ or you're relatively new to high-end tailoring, I recommend staying conservative with your choices, so this can be something you'll wear for a long time. Stay close to the language of classic men's dress. If you're doing a single-breasted linen suit, do a three-roll two or two-button, notch lapels, etc.
 

garthbernstein

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Stand naturally when being measured and fitted. Bespoke clothes are meant to fit not only your body's measurements but also your natural posture.

I also recommend going with a slightly heavier fabric. Lightweight linens can wrinkle in an unpleasing way -- sort of like Kleenex tissue. Whereas heavy linens rumple more than wrinkle.

Lastly, if this is your first bespoke suit and/ or you're relatively new to high-end tailoring, I recommend staying conservative with your choices, so this can be something you'll wear for a long time. Stay close to the language of classic men's dress. If you're doing a single-breasted linen suit, do a three-roll two or two-button, notch lapels, etc.
Thx, I like the idea of a DB irish linen (off white/tan/etc.) as I do not have a summer suit.
 

yanagi

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As a general tip, don't micro-manage the tailor.
  1. Tell them what you want (e.g. DB, 6x2, double vents)
  2. Answer questions that they ask you during the fittings.
  3. If something feels off, speak up.
Otherwise, trust them and just enjoy the process.
 

TheIronDandy

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I agree with DWW - if this is your first bespoke, play it safe. Get it in a style you already wear frequently.

When I first got into bespoke tailoring, I made the judgement error of getting the stuff I felt I couldn't get off-the-rack. Double breasted that actually fit me, unusual fabrics, peak lapels. Those early suits are now spectacular but rarely worn because my dressing habits didn't actually involve a lot of double breasted or chalk stripe flannel. I sometimes find an excuse to put them on, but they get less use TOGETHER than one of my later bespoke jackets (that is less spectacular but far more wearable).

Of course, if you're already a big DB wearer, that might not apply. But I really would suggest you order something in a style you know you will get lots of wear out of.

Irish linen is a great summer fabric, I would probably go tan over off-white since off-white stains so much easier, and you really don't want to have to clean a bespoke suit too often.

Best of luck!
 

garthbernstein

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I agree with DWW - if this is your first bespoke, play it safe. Get it in a style you already wear frequently.

When I first got into bespoke tailoring, I made the judgement error of getting the stuff I felt I couldn't get off-the-rack. Double breasted that actually fit me, unusual fabrics, peak lapels. Those early suits are now spectacular but rarely worn because my dressing habits didn't actually involve a lot of double breasted or chalk stripe flannel. I sometimes find an excuse to put them on, but they get less use TOGETHER than one of my later bespoke jackets (that is less spectacular but far more wearable).

Of course, if you're already a big DB wearer, that might not apply. But I really would suggest you order something in a style you know you will get lots of wear out of.

Irish linen is a great summer fabric, I would probably go tan over off-white since off-white stains so much easier, and you really don't want to have to clean a bespoke suit too often.

Best of luck!

Thank you! This is my fourth bespoke/semi bespoke MTM suit, I do love the feel and look of the two DB that I have already. Agreed on the tan, off white linen, Lyle Roblin has a great DB linen on IG that I love.
 

usctrojans31

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Listen to them when it comes to the specifics of the cloth. The tailor knows how the cloth performs against the tailor's work.

Luckily, it sounds like you're open minded on this and just have the style in mind and can determine together accordingly.

Looking forward to seeing the result. I like what I have seen of Lemmi online.
 

garthbernstein

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Listen to them when it comes to the specifics of the cloth. The tailor knows how the cloth performs against the tailor's work.

Luckily, it sounds like you're open minded on this and just have the style in mind and can determine together accordingly.

Looking forward to seeing the result. I like what I have seen of Lemmi online.
I like your tip and the previous tips to give the tailor the general guidelines and then follow his lead, that makes it easier than learning/memorizing how suits are made!
 

Despos

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Is a tan/off white linen suit useful in your wardrobe? Do you often have occasions this is appropriate for? How long is the season you could wear this? If you are starting now, you may not get it until the end of summer or even fall, not knowing their turn around time.
From the tailor's side, off white linen is a difficult first suit. You cannot see tailor's chalk well on that color. It's a pain to cut and work on for that reason. Linen creases and leaves crease lines. I never press seams or edges on linen during the fitting stage, only when I'm sure of the fit. The crease line may not come out if I have to lengthen or let out seams to make things bigger. Both hand and machine stitching can leave remnant holes in the cloth if things need to be let out.
Linen drapes differently than wool and this varies amongst the various weights of linen.
Have found many clients can't verbalize what they like when ordering a suit so I ask what hasn't worked for you in the past. Good to know what irritates you about the fit, feel or look of clothing you have and the things you struggle with. You can also communicate the recurring adjustments you need in how other clothes fit. Roll under the collar, tight armholes, restrictive movement, baggy seat on the trouser, trouser doesn't stay up, etc.
Know your preferences, like your tolerance for how close to the body or how easy you like the jacket to fit. How trim you like the trouser leg. Do you prefer a full or trim chest. How much expression do you like with waist suppression. Your general likes and dislikes.
This is the type of info that guides your tailor when fitting the suit. Very hard for a tailor to know how to fit you if he doesn't have an idea of your preferences in how you want the clothes to feel when you wear them. You may want a looser feel or not feel right in a jacket unless the jacket is hugging close to the body. Bottom line/long term appeal is you will enjoy the clothes that feel the best to you because the fit is is in line with your preferences of what feels right to you over the style of the suit.
 

garthbernstein

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Is a tan/off white linen suit useful in your wardrobe? Do you often have occasions this is appropriate for? How long is the season you could wear this? If you are starting now, you may not get it until the end of summer or even fall, not knowing their turn around time.
From the tailor's side, off white linen is a difficult first suit. You cannot see tailor's chalk well on that color. It's a pain to cut and work on for that reason. Linen creases and leaves crease lines. I never press seams or edges on linen during the fitting stage, only when I'm sure of the fit. The crease line may not come out if I have to lengthen or let out seams to make things bigger. Both hand and machine stitching can leave remnant holes in the cloth if things need to be let out.
Linen drapes differently than wool and this varies amongst the various weights of linen.
Have found many clients can't verbalize what they like when ordering a suit so I ask what hasn't worked for you in the past. Good to know what irritates you about the fit, feel or look of clothing you have and the things you struggle with. You can also communicate the recurring adjustments you need in how other clothes fit. Roll under the collar, tight armholes, restrictive movement, baggy seat on the trouser, trouser doesn't stay up, etc.
Know your preferences, like your tolerance for how close to the body or how easy you like the jacket to fit. How trim you like the trouser leg. Do you prefer a full or trim chest. How much expression do you like with waist suppression. Your general likes and dislikes.
This is the type of info that guides your tailor when fitting the suit. Very hard for a tailor to know how to fit you if he doesn't have an idea of your preferences in how you want the clothes to feel when you wear them. You may want a looser feel or not feel right in a jacket unless the jacket is hugging close to the body. Bottom line/long term appeal is you will enjoy the clothes that feel the best to you because the fit is is in line with your preferences of what feels right to you over the style of the suit.
Perfect, I will make notes on my current suits on what I "like" and "do not like" for the tailor
 

Encathol Epistemia

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Pardon me, I know that this has gone cold, but I thought of potentially useful advice from my own experience:

Think about small, practical details that you might have specific preferences about, but that a tailor might by default overlook or execute in a different way than you prefer. The first suit that Joseph Genuardi made for me lacked a pen pocket and the ticket pocket was too small for my card wallet, which holds my transit pass. This has been corrected for subsequent work, but I would have preferred to have taken it into account from the start. (I did, however, at least remember to ask for some additional features on the waistcoat to accommodate a pocket watch and no back pockets on the trousers)
 
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Nobilis Animus

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Know the side on which you dress beforehand. It makes things less awkward.
 

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