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Bespoke suit made by two separate tailors?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by dirtrider123, Apr 19, 2011.

  1. Fishball

    Fishball Senior member

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    I do it all the time. And I usually provide the cloth, buttons and even silk thread to my tailors.
    But you have to tell your tailors what you want in every details.
     


  2. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

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    not to hijack my own thread lol, but what fabric/pattern is the man on the far left in this photo wearing?

    I could be (very) wrong but that looks like some form of a Russell plaid.
     


  3. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    i once sent the pants to one place and the jacket to another.
    a fantastic rough Indigo linen weave
    when i put the entire suit on, it took we a while to realize what was wrong.
    the jacket was made on one side and the pants on the other.
    it did not match
     


  4. Fishball

    Fishball Senior member

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    i once sent the pants to one place and the jacket to another.
    a fantastic rough Indigo linen weave
    when i put the entire suit on, it took we a while to realize what was wrong.
    the jacket was made on one side and the pants on the other.
    it did not match


    The linen didn't have selvedge, isn't it?
    I can't image a cutter will cut a pant the other way around. Upside down is understandable, but not inside out if the cloth has selvedge.
     


  5. Michael Ay329

    Michael Ay329 Senior member

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    I am experimenting with some old cloth I found.

    I'm having Salvatore make the trousers...after they are ready, I will take my remaining cloth to my local bespoke tailor to make the vest and jacket...after having my tailor personally see Salvatore's work to ensure the cloth on the jacket/vest is made on the same side as the trouser
     


  6. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    I do this a lot.
     


  7. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The linen didn't have selvedge, isn't it?
    I can't image a cutter will cut a pant the other way around. Upside down is understandable, but not inside out if the cloth has selvedge.


    there was no woven selvedge. I had also washed the linen to beat it up a bit. there were still right and wrong sides

    since it is a solid linen. i wear the pieces separately
     


  8. bigbjorn

    bigbjorn Senior member

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    since it is a solid linen. i wear the pieces separately
    Heard in the workshop: "Psst, everyone, Carl is wearing his inside-out pants today."
     


  9. shoefan

    shoefan Senior member

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    I think the one thing, aside from the proper side of the cloth, is the orientation of the fabric if it has an assymetric pattern (for example, a double stripe with a combo of white and blue) or a noticeable nap. If the pants are cut with one orientation and the jacket the other, it would be a problem, so you definitely need to coordinate this. You don't want your pants to have the blue stripe on the inside and the jacket to have it on the outside, or vice versa.

    I recently made a pair of shoes, and the leather has a faint but nevertheless noticeable difference when you look at the leather from different directions. I cut all but one of the 4 quarter pieces in one orientation, and the fourth in the opposite orientation. I can see the difference between them when looking at the finished shoes.
     


  10. Fishball

    Fishball Senior member

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    I think the one thing, aside from the proper side of the cloth, is the orientation of the fabric if it has an assymetric pattern (for example, a double stripe with a combo of white and blue) or a noticeable nap. If the pants are cut with one orientation and the jacket the other, it would be a problem, so you definitely need to coordinate this. You don't want your pants to have the blue stripe on the inside and the jacket to have it on the outside, or vice versa.

    I recently made a pair of shoes, and the leather has a faint but nevertheless noticeable difference when you look at the leather from different directions. I cut all but one of the 4 quarter pieces in one orientation, and the fourth in the opposite orientation. I can see the difference between them when looking at the finished shoes.


    +1

    It is more noticeable on Cordovan than calf.
     


  11. dirtrider123

    dirtrider123 Well-Known Member

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    as an aside from my orginal question, can a bespoke tailor remake a suit from a pre-existing suit (as in a suit that I already own)? I am wondering because I have a suit that I love the fabric of, and it has sentimental value to me but the trouser waistband is going downhill, etc. Could a tailor at least put a new trouser waistband and pocketing in the pants, and new lining in the jacket?
     


  12. Mark Seitelman

    Mark Seitelman Senior member

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    Has anyone ever had a bespoke suit made by two different tailors (i.e. one does the pants, the other does the jacket)? I was wondering this because I have never seen trousers that I love more than the ambrosi trousers, while I am in love with rubinacci jackets. If I was able to provide both tailors with the same cloth, would it be possible to make a bespoke suit that effectively came from two separate tailors?

    Thanks,
    Ben



    Generally, the coat and pants are made by two separate tailors even if they work under the same roof.

    However, if you send the work to two different shops you may have the problem of chasing down one to get the work done. See, e.g., http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=237582.

    By contracting-out the separate parts you are acting as a clothier with all of the attendant headaches, such as getting the work done, getting the work done RIGHT, getting the correct fit, and getting timely delivery.

    One unsung task of the clothier is getting all the pieces made in a timely fashion. If you decide to contract-out the coat to Tailor A and the pants to Tailor B, then you will have to be the coordinator. You may have to chase down Tailor A or B for delivery as well as to rectify mistakes.

    In my opinion it is better to have the suit made by one maker who will take responsibility for getting it done once, getting it done right, and getting it delivered.

    I have a couple of friends who approached a well known pants maker. The pants maker was working "direct" with the customer and charged a low price to reflect that there was no retailer. The price was excellent, but there was one hitch. The pants were never delivered. The pants maker kept-on making promises and eventually ducked the customers. The pants maker finally returned the cloth after getting a lawyer's letter. If the customers had gone to the local retailer they would have paid more, but they would have gotten the pants. It seems that one of the jobs of the retailer is to coax the work from the maker.

    My suggestion is to use Rubinacci for the whole deal. If you want more handwork, order it, and they should be happy to provide it along for an added charge. Incidentally, I have heard that Ambrosi makes Rubinacci's pants. Rubinacci may be able to coax the work out of Ambrosi faster than you could.

    Good luck.
     


  13. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Incidentally, I have heard that Ambrosi makes Rubinacci's pants.

    Rubinacci pants are made in house. Ambrosi used to make them, or some, but Mariano asked Antonio A. to come to LH full time and Antonio preferred to stay independent.
     


  14. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

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    Mariano asked Antonio A. to come to LH full time and Antonio preferred to stay independent.

    He obviously didn't make him an offer he couldn't refuse.
     


  15. Mark Seitelman

    Mark Seitelman Senior member

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    as an aside from my orginal question, can a bespoke tailor remake a suit from a pre-existing suit (as in a suit that I already own)? I am wondering because I have a suit that I love the fabric of, and it has sentimental value to me but the trouser waistband is going downhill, etc. Could a tailor at least put a new trouser waistband and pocketing in the pants, and new lining in the jacket?


    Yes. These are routine repairs.

    I have not had a new waistband done, but I have had new trouser pockets, new trouser lining, and a re-lined coat.

    Just make sure that the rest of the suit is in good condition before undertaking the expense which can run a few hundred dollars.

    Good luck.
     


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