Bespoke Shooting Suit- recommendations

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by NorfolkMan, Mar 4, 2013.

  1. JDMills

    JDMills Senior member

    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    29
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2010
    I dont know how many shooting suits he cuts, but Graham Browne I've heard good things of (for city suits anyways), or like everyone else I suggest Bookster (got an overcoat from them, amazing quality and great customer service!)
     


  2. bboysdontcryy

    bboysdontcryy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    227
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Location:
    London
    

    I'm not sure about that -- 1870 is quite a long time ago so I don't profess knowledge as to what they wore, but you might be right. I can only speculate that the fit of the coats might have been different? Today, coats are relatively well fitted and it's almost impossible to draw your gun fast enough without the aid of bi-swing pleats, if you wear a shooting jacket. Or you might like to see it as a feature that enhances performance. There's no reason why just because a feature was not present during the golden age, means that its inclusion doesn't enhance performance today.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013


  3. Leaves

    Leaves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    4,774
    Likes Received:
    2,979
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2010
    Location:
    Sweden
    

    I can recommend Graham Browne (city tailors off Bow Lane near Bank). They have made up a couple of heavy tweed sports coats for me, not shooting jackets but still. Love their stuff and reasonably priced; about £ 900-1200 for a two piece suit depending on mats.
     


  4. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

    Messages:
    8,661
    Likes Received:
    412
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    

    Well, in the interests of empirical testing, while wearing a W.W. Chan Shetland tweed jacket I happened to have on, I took out my nice English-style sidelock double gun from Grulla of Eibar and tried mounting and swinging it on birds in my yard. I could not discern that a conventional sport coat handicapped me in the least. Nonetheless, I would be the first to admit that I am not nearly as proficient in wingshooting as I am with with either pistol or rifle.

    Among other sources, I checked Game Shooting by the eminent British gunmaker, shooting authority and forensic ballistician Robert Churchill (of "XXV" fame). In most of the illustrations he was wearing a garish-looking shooting suit in a bold houndstooth tweed, complete with breeches and a matching cap. It did not have the pleated, bi-swing back, and this was well after they had come into vogue.

    As far as enhancing performance goes, Lord Walsingham and Lord Ripon are still, I think, ranked as the two greatest game shots of all time, and they managed without the bi-swing back.

    If a man wants to get a shooting jacket or suit with this feature, it's fine with me, but I don't think it should be considered a sine qua non of a good shooting suit.

    On a final note, what do you mean by "drawing" a gun in this context? Here in the States we "draw" our handguns. Our shotguns we "mount."
     


  5. bboysdontcryy

    bboysdontcryy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    227
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Location:
    London
    

    You're missing the point -- just because a feature wasn't included (long ago before tailors decided to innovate) doesn't mean that it's inclusion doesn't increase performance, no matter how marginal. Who's to say that Ripon wouldn't have shot even more game had his tailor decided to add pleats?

    Just because you don't think so, and it seems like you don't have one with a bi-swing back (gauging from your posts, I think it's sufficient for me to infer so), doesn't mean that it doesn't aid performance. Logically, think about it, extra room created by the addition of pleats is for show? If you think so, be my guest.

    To give you another example -- it's considered correct form not to have vents for a dinner suit. Sure, people got by. Comfortable? I don't think so.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013


  6. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

    Messages:
    8,661
    Likes Received:
    412
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    

    Of course, I don't have a shooting suit! I am an American, and Americans don't commonly wear shooting suits. Besides, if I wore one at the start of dove season, I would surely die of heat prostration, and in a lot of our quail country--amid the mesquite, manzanita, prickly pear and Spanish dagger--well, it would mean the rapid demise of a nice tailored garment. Anyway, as I noted early on, I don't think too many British shooting men wear them these days.
     


  7. David Reeves

    David Reeves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    3,122
    Likes Received:
    2,076
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Location:
    New York
    Does Cordings do a made to measure maybe?
     


  8. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,995
    Likes Received:
    267
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    

    They does, but still in their unflattering cut. Might as well walk across the street and give Huntsman a shout.
     


  9. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,995
    Likes Received:
    267
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    

    My friend, you need to post your awesome b-swing coats to finish the argument!! The new one from the fitting was EXCELLENT!!!!
     


  10. Big A

    Big A Senior member

    Messages:
    2,112
    Likes Received:
    258
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Location:
    At your house, when you're not there
    I have a vintage shooting suit with a conventional back and a newer tweed jacket with an action back (which is the same thing as a bi-swing back, I think). I've shot skeet (and the occasional bird) in both jackets, and it's definitely easier in the action back.
     


  11. Cold Iron

    Cold Iron Senior member

    Messages:
    1,341
    Likes Received:
    601
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Yes it is, and I am looking forward to seeing pictures of what you end up with please!

    In England it does seem like Bookster is still one of the most common from what is posted on shotgun world. And in the US there is still Ermilo Clothier in Pa. http://kermilio.wix.com/ermilio-clothier- among others. I think some are confusing shooting and field. Although Barbour did make a dual purpose jacket for a few years. I recall in the early 70's that it was common for men in suits to be shooting trap and skeet, at least in Upstate NY. Today in the US a shooting jacket is more likely only seen at a few special double gun events with a classic SxS being used. And in the field in the Southeast US at an old style Plantation quail hunt with mule drawn wagons or buggies. But outside of that you will not see one on the trap or skeet field any more, and never for what the English would call rough hunting.

    The original shooting jacket, the Norfolk, was designed with a loose fit across the back and shoulders to prevent restriction of movement. Most action back shooting jackets are now bi-swing. Good shooting to you.
     


  12. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

    Messages:
    8,661
    Likes Received:
    412
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    

    I am still waiting to learn what "drawing your gun" means in this context.
     


  13. Big A

    Big A Senior member

    Messages:
    2,112
    Likes Received:
    258
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Location:
    At your house, when you're not there
    

    [​IMG]

    Too obvious?
     


  14. Rusty G.

    Rusty G. Senior member

    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    I've got a three piece shooting suit, but it's not Bespoke. I bought it for my first pheasant shoot in Exeter about a decade ago. Since that time, I've been on probably 3 shoots in the Borders (Kelso area). Pheasant shoots in Great Britain are elaborate affairs, even though you can get muddy. You wear a dress shirt and tie, vest/waistcoat, suit coat and knickerbocker style pants. You wear long socks and hold them up with flashes: http://www.orvis.com/store/product.aspx?pf_id=3G6X
    When you actually go into the field, you switch to rubber wellingtons because you walk through fields to get to where you will be shooting.
     


  15. bboysdontcryy

    bboysdontcryy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    227
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Location:
    London
    

    I find your raising of this matter borderline weird. When it seems your logic is problematic on your main point, you then try to quibble over a slip which is not even tangentially related. If I mean to use a forum the way I do legal work, I'd proof read my posts many times. Truth is, I don't, this is a source of entertainment and thus, slips occasionally occur because I happened to be thinking about something else when I'm writing. You've never made an unintentional slip? Maybe you have but nobody bothers to point it out to you since it's quite farfetched to do so if it isn't the main point.

    Also, was wondering if you know that handguns have been used for quite some time now when hunting mid-sized games (even big game). Should the gun be drawn then?

    If for the record, you insist on knowing why that slip happened: I can't say for certain why, but from my memory, I happened to be multi-tasking and chatting with an American about football and also about Obama's gun-control strategy though I do not recall what exactly when I was replying. Does that satisfy you? And it might be well be because I was thinking about guns (note I didn't say draw your shotgun ...)

    For the record, I do know that you mount your shotgun, I served in the military for a couple of years.

    On an unrelated note, these days another technique that tailors use is to have a single piece back with multiple darts in them to give allowance and space.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by