Bespoke Shirt Fitting - What to Look For?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by PSNY, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    If it essentially is a throw away, I use some vintage blue fabric that is a really tough shade to sell.
    It is wearable as a shirt, and even a decent quality. but I have a lot of it and it was bought for $1.00 per yard.

    at charvet prices. they can afford to use a basic white
     


  2. Dempsy444

    Dempsy444 Senior member

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    You could fly to Torino Italy and have Mary Frittolini make your shirts;)

    http://www.maryfrittolini.com/il-prodotto/
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2013


  3. johanm

    johanm Senior member

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    Even if you do trial shirts with muslin or throwaway cloth, there is going to be some trial and error.

    For example, I've found that cloth weight plays a role in how the fabric drapes. Lighter cloth tends to fall straight down, so extra fabric doesn't disturb the silhouette, whereas heavier cloth tends to bunch around the waist and flare along the back and sides. So to achieve a consistently slim silhouette, my shirtmaker eliminates the side pleats and puts more fabric inside the darts on my oxford shirts.
     


  4. Griffyndor

    Griffyndor Senior member

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    Ive thought about seeing her in paris. The thread with her work here displayed one of the bet fits I've seen. But I need someone in NY or I'd just stick with Charvet.
     


  5. Dempsy444

    Dempsy444 Senior member

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    Makes sense. Does she ever come to the States?
    Have you ever tried Alex?
     


  6. Griffyndor

    Griffyndor Senior member

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    I don't believe she comes to the states. Never tried Alex. I thought he stopped taking new customers but I may be wrong. I don't see many examples of his work but I'd try it.
     


  7. Stugotes

    Stugotes Senior member

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    I found out that you can basically go to any town in Italy and find a small camiceria. For example, I found one near my parents' summer home where a family works above their small showroom and the fit is spot on. After a year of wear, they show no real sign of wear.

    They couldn't recommend a local sartoria, though, that seems to be a whole other level.
     


  8. David Reeves

    David Reeves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    Lots and lots of new young people getting into custom clothing these days but a lot of them are bizzarely scared to death by the process......it's really, really easy actually. If you don't know what your opinions and tastes are though it may be wise to take some professional advice until you develop your own.

    Having said that a lot of custom makers dress like shit so I can understand the anxiety to a degree.
     


  9. AlexE

    AlexE Senior member

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    I think a good starting point would be to think about some basic aspects
    - What is the basic look you are striving for? A classic silhouette or a fashionable slim cut? In the latter case, will it be acceptable at the occasions (e.g. work) where you intend to wear the shirt or will the shirt be doomed to stay in your closet?
    - Next I would look up pictures of people with shirts falling into the chosen fit category, which you really like
    - Then I would note down any features which are particularly important for you, e.g. special type of cuffs, collar etc.

    The next step is to go to a reputable tailor in your proximity and discuss what you are looking for in broad terms (should the tailor try to argue with you whether your basic fit choice is right or wrong, you should leave since it does not help you if you are talked into a classic or fashionable look which you do not want). Discuss which features are not negotiable for you and discuss the example pictures you have found. Listen to the tailor and consider any recommendations coming from him/her ... then go with one trial shirt which you should wear for a while until you figure out what works / does not work for you.

    If you should decide to post fit critique photos here, take the responses with a grain of salt since fit is to a large degree a question of personal taste.
     


  10. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    As a shirtmaker, I would disagree.

    most of my customers have difficulty getting the fit they are looking for in a RTW shirt.

    yesterday I had 4 customers
    1: size 17 neck on a 15.5 body with short arms.
    2: very slim and long arms with a slightly larger neck then what his chest size would come with.
    3: Could fit into a slim fitting dress shirt, but might take a number of tries to find the one that works. (Brooks slim would be too large, The Brooks extra slim would not work for his shoulders)
    4: arms shorter then average. and buys lots of nontraditional patterns.

    There is a growing percentage of customers , who could find RTW shirts that fit decently.
    They just like the process of having their clothing made for them.

    Carl
     


  11. David Reeves

    David Reeves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    I think Bespoke should be a luxury product, its not for the Proles :D

    Seriously though I think that the trend were people think that beautiful "bespoke" clothes is something within everyones reach is a big con and not helpful. Of course its just marketing and people will kid themselves if the price is low enough, but you really cant do the highest quality work on a shoestring.

    Whats wrong with being in the luxury business anyway?
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014


  12. johanm

    johanm Senior member

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    Kind of a douchebaggy way of putting it, but if that's what your customers respond to...
     


  13. David Reeves

    David Reeves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    Not really. It's about being realistic and "cutting your cloth to your means" (and there is no shame in that).It's highly pretentious for people to expect to dress up like a prince but pay peanuts....that is being a "douche bag" or it's just sad.

    I would love everybody to be able to buy beautiful bespoke clothes, believe me. But that's just not realistic. These posts on here often going on about full canvas this and that, just put undue pressure on young people on styleforum with its young demographic. I remember being 19 looking at GQ and it had an article about things you need to be a man, one of them was a suit that's made for you bespoke. At the time I was sort of like whoa really? It's the male equivalent of thigh gap.

    From my perspective what I do is very much a luxury business and thats the core of what that business stands for, its unfortunate that it cant be for everyone but that is just the nature of the business and life.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014


  14. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    the term Luxury is just as fake as the term Bespoke.
    it is overused and almost irrelevant.
    does anyone build a condo in NYC that is not Luxury?

    is all of the clothing turned out by so called Luxury brands.
    Thomas Pink is considered a luxury brand since it is owned by LVMH.
    everything LVMH is luxury. Have you seen some of the crap they sell.
    $200+ for a poorly made shirt from Viet Nam.

    Paying for quality and attention to detail is one thing.
    Paying for a luxury Brand is very hit or miss.

    Luxury is available to the masses. Go to Woodbury commons to buy discounted luxury.
     


  15. David Reeves

    David Reeves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    With respect Carl this just makes you sound like you don't understand what luxury is.

    Here is my opinion on the term bespoke and being in a luxury business (taken from an interview in Luxe in a city)

    In your words, what is the bespoke suit experience? What makes it different to the "made-to-measure" experience?

    Fundamentally, made to measure is an item made from adapted patterns. We make an individual pattern for every client. This is one of the few things that most people can agree on what differentiates a made to measure suit and a bespoke suit.

    Nowadays the term Bespoke is a very trendy word. In London, the Savile Row association tried to legally enshrine what a bespoke suit was. The courts decided that the term had moved on and was applicable to made to measure as well. So does this mean that the term is now useless? Well not really, although today it’s not a guarantee of quality or that you are getting a definitive article.

    As a consumer you need to look beyond the label, look at the product that is being offered and the service. For me the term isn’t a buzzword I discovered last year. When I started in this business 15 years ago, Bespoke was very much a niche luxury business, it was as simple as that and it was important for me to understand this. Is custom clothing in general a luxury business now? I would say less so when you can measure yourself and get sent a shirt a week later cranked out of a factory, order made to measure out of the back of a truck, or be assailed on the subway by suit salesmen because you are dressed well. However, those makers are not dealing in luxury and they do not understand it.

    The Bespoke experience, as I see it, is not simply about having a suit made for you, but having a beautiful garment made for you—it’s always more luxurious, because it’s made for you and you alone. We are getting back to the days when everyone had custom clothing, before they were mass produced. In that time all clothes were not created equally. Naming and semantics aside, I am simply in the business of making some of the best custom made clothing in the world.


    Read more: DAVID REEVES BESPOKE - Tailoring Men Fashion in NYC http://www.luxeinacity.com/blog/david-reeves-bespoke--tailoring-men-fashion-in-nyc/#ixzz2pdgUrbnx
     


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