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Bamboo fabric for a sports jacket?

tabcollar

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I was looking at some fabrics for a new sports jacket, and my tailor showed me a nice brown check in a bamboo fabric. I never knew that bamboo cloth existed! Has anyone had experience with bamboo for tailored jackets, and if so, could you comment on the pluses and minuses as compared to wool? The prices are apparently comparable.
 

usctrojans31

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If my memory serves me correctly, I do believe it is known for trapping heat and not holding a crease.
 

tabcollar

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If my memory serves me correctly, I do believe it is known for trapping heat and not holding a crease.
Thanks for your response. Since this would be for a jacket only, I guess not holding a crease wouldn't be an issue. Interestingly, the consultant at the tailoring shop said just the opposite about heat--that the jacket would be cooler than wool would be. I'll look into it further. Thanks again.
 

madhat

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Thanks for your response. Since this would be for a jacket only, I guess not holding a crease wouldn't be an issue. Interestingly, the consultant at the tailoring shop said just the opposite about heat--that the jacket would be cooler than wool would be. I'll look into it further. Thanks again.
I would think the temperature properties would be more tied to the weave than the material. If you're comparing to a fresco wool vs a worsted wool for instance. I would think bamboo would be a looser weave, though, based on the clothes I've handled.
 

tabcollar

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I would think the temperature properties would be more tied to the weave than the material. If you're comparing to a fresco wool vs a worsted wool for instance. I would think bamboo would be a looser weave, though, based on the clothes I've handled.
Thanks. I'll be sure to inquire about the weave.
 

Despos

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Worked with the cloth once and wouldn't again. The cloth was not stable and would stretch and grow. Had to take the jacket in twice. Didn't have much body. Would not recommend when there are so many better choices.
 

Andy57

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I'm not a fan of bamboo myself. The concept feels gimmicky to me. But the cloth is wonderfully soft and those that have used it, that I know about, claim it to be a good warm weather cloth. Matthew DeBoise, of Steed Bespoke Tailors made himself a jacket from bamboo, which he told me he liked a lot. I think there are better choices for a warm weather jacket, but it's really up to you. I'd look for something in a wool, silk, & linen blend, or just silk and linen.
 

tabcollar

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Thank you, gentlemen. This has been very helpful. I'm going to look for something other than bamboo.
 

ojaw

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Thank you, gentlemen. This has been very helpful. I'm going to look for something other than bamboo.
Late to the party, but I didn't see it mentioned upthread - bamboo is just rayon using a different source than wood fibres so it's basically plastic. I would not recommend it when you have so many amazing options in natural materials, especially wools.
 

MBennett

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I would think the temperature properties would be more tied to the weave than the material. If you're comparing to a fresco wool vs a worsted wool for instance. I would think bamboo would be a looser weave, though, based on the clothes I've handled.
Some of what you have written is not quite right. You cannot compare fresco to worsted wool as fresco is a weave and a finish, and worsted wool is a yarn. Fresco cloths are almost always made of worsted wool. All sheep wool is made into either worsted or woolen yarns. The fabric you make from it can be of many varieties including fresco.
Bamboo is a also a fiber and has the property of being able to carry a wide range of finishes. I do not care for it as a cloth myself.
 

MBennett

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I was looking at some fabrics for a new sports jacket, and my tailor showed me a nice brown check in a bamboo fabric. I never knew that bamboo cloth existed! Has anyone had experience with bamboo for tailored jackets, and if so, could you comment on the pluses and minuses as compared to wool? The prices are apparently comparable.
Fibers used to make yarns which are in turn used to weave fabrics fall into various categories.
Natural animal such as wool, cashmere, mohair, camel hair etc.
Natural plant such as cotton, linen, ramie etc.
Man-made such as polyester, nylon etc.
And the weird hybrid category known as Cellulosic Man-made fibers such as rayon, viscose, acetate, bemberg, tencel, bamboo etc.
What they all have in common is that they are derived from some form of plant cellulose which is then chemically broken down and though science/magic are spun into fibers from which yarns are twisted. Those yarns are then woven into fabric.
Each of these varieties is produced from a different source of cellulose such as the cotton fibers left on the seeds after separation, corn stalks, wood pulp, or bamboo. (Bamboo fabric is not actually bamboo fibers as many people think. It is bamboo cellulose, which is chemically liquefied, then turned back into fibers.)
They are all essentially the same chemically, but for various reasons have slightly different properties.
Bemberg, for example makes the best suit linings you can get. It's silky, retains its shape and color, wicks moisture, dries quickly etc.
Bamboo is just another one of these. It has the desirable characteristic of being able to take a wide variety of finishes and has a soft hand and a nice luster. It can appear very luxurious when choosing fabrics.
I DO NOT recommend it as it generally does not retain its shape well at all. It is not particularly strong and often stretches at stress points.
 

GoneToPlaid

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I agree with your choices of fabrics for suits and jackets. I assume that a bamboo sports jacket actually is rayon which is made from bamboo. I bought a few pairs of rayon socks which were made from bamboo. The socks were marketed as "eco-friendly". One issue was that that the socks became wet with foot sweat. The other issue is that my well trimmed big toe nails wore holes in the ends of the socks after a single day of use. The upshot is that rayon does not wear well.
 

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