B&S Etiquette: Buyers not making offers but instead asking what your lowest price is

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by stylenewbie, Jun 27, 2013.

  1. stylenewbie

    stylenewbie Senior member

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    Does anybody else think this is poor etiquette? This really grinds my gears. It's essentially making the seller counter his own offer imho. I feel like the seller has already made an offer by setting his price, and it's up to the buyer to make a counter offer.

    I had one buyer ask how low I could go and I stupidly gave him another offer. Then he gave me a range of $100 he might consider, but still refused to give an actual number. I told him to make me an offer instead. So he pussyfooted around and said he couldn't get around to making a set offer until I would tell him if I would accept an offer in that range. I told him I'd prefer if he just sent me an offer. And he never responded.

    Argggh :fu:
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013


  2. AZsundevil

    AZsundevil Well-Known Member

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    "What is the highest you are willing to pay?"

    or

    Just repeat the asking price that you listed in your ad.
     


  3. stylenewbie

    stylenewbie Senior member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013


  4. TM79

    TM79 Senior member

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    Ugh - yeah, OP, I hate this crap.

    I haven't sold anything here but I sell things on Craigslist a lot and I've been seeing it happen there constantly instead of seeing real counteroffers. I delete those emails because I don't even want to waste my time with someone like that.

    It also seems like the worst bartering tactic ever and a sure fire way to piss someone off and make them not want to deal with you.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013


  5. Stugotes

    Stugotes Senior member

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    I get this all the time. It pisses me of to no end. I've stopped responding to these messages by now.
     


  6. PapaRubbery

    PapaRubbery Senior member

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    My response to low-balling is always:

    "Sure I'll sell it to you for $x less. Of course I'll need you to permanently loan me $x and never ask for it back again"

    Paying interest is against my religion.
     


  7. Ilovelobbs

    Ilovelobbs Senior member

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    Quote:I think you should start naming and shaming these time wasters...
     


  8. Veremund

    Veremund Senior member

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    My answer: "That's not how this works. Make me an offer."
     


  9. tonylamer

    tonylamer Senior member

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    I disagree with everyone who posted above. I've done a lot of business in the B&S, and it's basically a flea market. It's not like asking a sales associate for a better price; you're asking the person who's selling to give you an honest price on the pre-owned Polo sportcoat that they've listed for $400. (If it were listed at $100, there would've been multiple offers and it would have sold before the PM.) It doesn't waste time; it's how I've made a lot of sales and built a lot of my wardrobe.

    The reason why the B&S is dozens of pages deep with unsold stuff is because a lot of sellers don't understand that the guy who asks you for your best price is willing to work with you on a deal. And pre-owned clothes don't retain 100% of their value. If you're set on getting $900 for your pre-owned Lobbs, then just make it clear in your post that you won't accept or respond to any offers.
     


  10. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    I don't see that as a problem, you always have guys come back and forth on an item. I seldomly sell clothe here (or anywhere for matter), but the few times I did fit your description. It's clear what their intentions are, i.e. if they give you a range and refuse to be nailed down, then you can be sure it's toward the bottom of the range. You just have to work with that, you can always just say I need a firm number otherwise I can't work with you.
     


  11. stant62

    stant62 Senior member

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    I don't find this to be an issue - it's 1000x more polite than huge lowball (40+% below list price) on relatively inexpensive items. For example I just wanted to get rid of an item I had and countered that the buyer covers my PP and shipping and he/she balked. You can honestly fork out $10 more for a $100 item? Jeez...
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013


  12. Holdfast

    Holdfast Senior member

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    I don't think it's reasonable to expect a particular negotiating etiquette; everyone will bring their own style to the table. It's up to you as a seller to develop a range of responses to meet the range of negotiating styles people have. Which includes gauging how much effort to put into particular conversations, based on whether they're likely to be a dead-end.

    Quite a few years ago, I sold a moderate amount of NWT stuff on the forum and it was noticeable just how different people were in discussing price. In those days, I prioritised rapid turnover of items, so would cut my prices aggressively to find the market value that moved the item within the timeframe I wanted. These days, I only occasionally sell used items from my own wardrobe instead, so tolerate a much longer wait and can ask a commensurately higher price as I've no need to turn stock over.

    Perhaps I'm just naive, but I don't think anyone's ever set out to deliberately waste my time over those years. It's more that every item has a different value to each person that sees it, and some people are more willing to test the waters even if they haven't fully convinced themselves they actually want the item. I wouldn't view it as annoying or time-wasting; instead, it's an opportunity to present the item in the best light to them and if it's rapidly obvious that you're not in the same ballpark on price, to part amicably (but swiftly) until the next item comes along... or you decide to cut your price.

    Getting annoyed over a negotiation is only likely to harm the maximum value you can extract from the negotiation because you'll go on tilt. Zen it out, dude , Zen it out. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013


  13. Cedric

    Cedric Senior member

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    :rotflmao:

    I am a sales guy.

    And this is a known a sales/negotiating technique.
    It could also be used to see how desperate the seller is.

    Buyer asks seller the lowest price he;d be willing to sell for, when seller responds, then buyer makes offer from that particular price point, instead of the original asking price.
    Car salesmen use it all the time " How much are you willing to put down, How much can you afford to pay every month" ... same stuff.
     


  14. laufer

    laufer Senior member

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    Cedric,

    got it right. It is all about leverage. I do not get upset I give them my lowest price and that's that I do not go below that.
     


  15. MalfordOfLondon

    MalfordOfLondon Senior member

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