• I'm happy to introduce the Styleforum Happy Hour, our brand new podcast featuring lively discussion about menswear and the fashion industry. In the inaugural edition, a discussion of what's going on in retail today. Please check it out on the Journal. All episodes will be also be available soon on your favorite podcast platform.

  • Styleforum Gives - Holiday Charity Auction 8: Cuir de Russie card case from Equus Leather

    We are very proud to present this year's edition of the Styleforum Holiday Charity Auctions, this year in support of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Spokane (www.rmhcspokane.org). Each Auction lasts 24 hours. Please follow and bid on all the auctions.

    The 8th auction is for a Cuir de Russie card case from Equus Leather. Please bid often and generously here

    Fok and the Styleforum Team.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Avoiding suits that wrinkle. Any tips?

Interface

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2008
Messages
50
Reaction score
0
Greetings.

I have a few suits. Their materials differ somewhat with respect to their tendency to wrinkle. For instance, I have an off-the-rack suit that does not seem to wrinkle much. On the other hand, I have a made-to-measure (and therefore more expensive!) suit that wrinkles much more easily "” the pants wrinkle the most behind the knees and in the crotch; the jacket wrinkles the most on its back.

Is there a way to avoid this? How can I determine before buying a suit whether it is wrinkle-free? What questions should I ask the tailor? Should I have any reason not to search for wrinkle-free fabrics in the first place? (I ask that last question because, who knows, maybe there is much less variety of such fabrics, and maybe those fabrics have other disadvantages I don't know about?)

To summarize: I severely dislike wrinkles on my suits. Any advice on avoiding wrinkles on my future suits is greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Interface.
 

Cary Grant

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2008
Messages
9,674
Reaction score
411
The off the rack is likely made with a lesser grade/thicker wool. When you get into the finer woools aka "super-120's" and higher numbers, while they feel great on the hand, they will be prone to wrinkles. It's a trade-off.
 

Milhouse

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 11, 2007
Messages
2,059
Reaction score
1
Buy suits made from more substantial fabric. My garments made from thick flannel cloth almost never wrinkle. My garments made from light and thin super 120s tend to wrinkle much more.
 

Zenny

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2008
Messages
1,845
Reaction score
2
Tweed never wrinkles.
 

Concordia

Distinguished Member
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Oct 6, 2004
Messages
6,642
Reaction score
978
There are some fabrics specifically woven to avoid wrinkles-- they will be tagged with such descriptors as "high-twist," "Fresco," "3- (or 4-) ply," "travel," and so on. Not usually the softest, most expensive, or most elegant but they will hold up better over a long day.

Otherwise, avoid many (not all) high-Super #s, cashmere blends, and similar deluxe touches. The old-fashioned English merchants tend to produce sturdier stuff than the Italians or other continentals. That's a gross generalization of course, but if you avoid "Super 180 Loro Piana with cashmere" you have a running jump on the problem.
 

Interface

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2008
Messages
50
Reaction score
0
Okay, many thanks. My made-to-measure suit indeed has a super-120 material. Guess that explains it then.
 

pabloj

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
1,163
Reaction score
3
Wool-Mohair should be wrinkle resistant
 

Interface

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2008
Messages
50
Reaction score
0
Originally Posted by Cary Grant
The off the rack is likely made with a lesser grade/thicker wool. When you get into the finer woools aka "super-120's" and higher numbers, while they feel great on the hand, they will be prone to wrinkles. It's a trade-off.
Originally Posted by Concordia
Otherwise, avoid many (not all) high-Super #s, cashmere blends, and similar deluxe touches. The old-fashioned English merchants tend to produce sturdier stuff than the Italians or other continentals. That's a gross generalization of course, but if you avoid "Super 180 Loro Piana with cashmere" you have a running jump on the problem.
Out of curiosity, what does the number after "Super" really tell you? In what ways is Super 120 different from Super 180? Does a lower Super-number necessarily mean it is more wrinkle-resistant?
 

Interface

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2008
Messages
50
Reaction score
0
Noone has an idea? I try asking again. Does
a lower Super number​
always lead to
more wrinkle-resistance?​
 

johnny_flapjack

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2007
Messages
1,694
Reaction score
2
Originally Posted by Interface
Out of curiosity, what does the number after "Super" really tell you? In what ways is Super 120 different from Super 180? Does a lower Super-number necessarily mean it is more wrinkle-resistant?

Search on this. I think I remember Manton explaining well it not too long ago.
 

Doc4

Senior Member
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
799
Reaction score
2
Originally Posted by Zenny
Tweed never wrinkles.

Linen always does.
 

Tarmac

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2006
Messages
7,219
Reaction score
33
Originally Posted by Interface
Noone has an idea? I try asking again. Does

a lower Super number​

always lead to

more wrinkle-resistance?​

I don't think this is a rule. I have seen very fine 120 or 140 at Borelli which was really tough to wrinkle, while their heavier denser suitings wrinkled more easily. Maybe someone else can explain this
 

Concordia

Distinguished Member
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Oct 6, 2004
Messages
6,642
Reaction score
978
Originally Posted by Interface
Out of curiosity, what does the number after "Super" really tell you? In what ways is Super 120 different from Super 180? Does a lower Super-number necessarily mean it is more wrinkle-resistant?


The number is the number of something (spools, I think) one can make out of a given measure of raw wool. So a finer batch of fibers can be spun into a very fine thread, which can be stretched a long way. Kiton plays the inverse of this, which is to quote the thickness of their fibers in microns. A lower number <=> finer.

There are some really excellent cloths made of high-Supers threads. Just don't expect them to be cheap.
 

grimslade

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Mar 31, 2006
Messages
10,883
Reaction score
49
There are a bunch of threads on what Super #s do and don't mean if you search for them. I have Super 180s that are very wrinkle resistant, but I wouldn't suggest that that is typical of anything.
 

JimInSoCalif

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2007
Messages
313
Reaction score
1
I understand that the number after the word 'Super' is an indication of how fine the thread is, but what does the term 'Super' indicate and is there a term for cloth that is not so super?

Thank you, Jim.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

How many pairs of shoes do you own?

  • 1 - 4

    Votes: 30 3.6%
  • 5 - 10

    Votes: 143 17.3%
  • 11 - 20

    Votes: 270 32.7%
  • 21 - 30

    Votes: 130 15.8%
  • 31 - 40

    Votes: 71 8.6%
  • 41 - 50

    Votes: 48 5.8%
  • 51 - 60

    Votes: 25 3.0%
  • 61 - 70

    Votes: 22 2.7%
  • 71 - 80

    Votes: 17 2.1%
  • 81 - 90

    Votes: 7 0.8%
  • 91 - 100

    Votes: 9 1.1%
  • 100+

    Votes: 53 6.4%

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
429,121
Messages
9,229,339
Members
193,736
Latest member
Beebsta R.
Top