Austro-Hungarian school of shoemaking

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by fritzl, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. Sonny58

    Sonny58 Senior member

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    I'm not sure exactly how long it takes. The article says:

    It goes on to say that to become a 'master' the journeyman had to make a shoe that was to be judged by the whole guild, that this process took longer than the process of becoming a foot surgeon today, and that a master shoemaker knows as much about feet as a modern foot surgeon.

    It also described one such 'journeyman' who went to England not to return. His name was Tuczek and apprenticed George Cleverly.
     


  2. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    glad, you love the thread. your contribution is extremly helpful.


    nowadays, it's a commission of selected persons. the knowledege about orthopedic is still an important part of the apprentice education and training. fwiw, i've been told by a german maker, that the austrian system is one of the strictest in the world.

    there's a habit, that the journeyman makes a shoe for the master, who trained him and donates it to him.


    a fact, which is often ignored around this places, anyway.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2011


  3. Sonny58

    Sonny58 Senior member

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    Thanks but it is not my contribution, it is The Rake. It is a good publication.
     


  4. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    yeah, but you typed it. very generous.
     


  5. Newcomer

    Newcomer Senior member

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    Now that has got to be the most interesting thing I have heard in quite some time on these boards.
     


  6. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    funny enough, that it has been brought up periodically, while the big shoe "battles". :D
     


  7. luk-cha

    luk-cha Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    note to self - get rake this month!
     


  8. F. Corbera

    F. Corbera Senior member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011


  9. luk-cha

    luk-cha Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    dunno i have never been to SG
     


  10. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Work your way through this thread, with contributions of various members of the Tuczek family (who must have found it through google).

    http://www.styleforum.net/t/14822/history-of-tuczeks

    Apparently, it wasn't Nikolaus Tuczek, society shoemaker of London's Clifford Street, who was the migrant from Austro/Hungary but his father who was also called Nikolaus, a shoemaker. who arrived in 1846 and later became a naturalised Englishman. I have no idea, whether the father was trained as shoemaker in his homeland and, if so, whether he was a journeyman or a qualified master.

    Before that bit of information that the shoemaker who trained George Cleverley was English-born, I had always wondered how he could have had a well-run business throughout WW1. (Cleverley (the firm), says in their literature that Cleverley (the man) returned from the war and started work with Tuczek, a high society shoemaker in London's West-End. Had Nikolaus (junior) been the migrant, he would have been interned as an 'enemy alien' and any business he might have had before the war would have been in ruins.

    I haven't seen that Rake article, so I have no opinion either way, but that direct link between Austrian shoemaking and Cleverley seems to be a bit far-fetched.
     


  11. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    omg, this is so stubborn. nvm.
     


  12. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    fwiw, the nicest pair of boots i have seen is yours and it's made by the workshop of master shoemaker Georg Materna, Vienna. so what's your problem?
     


  13. Sonny58

    Sonny58 Senior member

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    I had no idea there was a controversy around this matter. But, to hopefully add some clarity to The Rake's account:

     


  14. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    actually, no controversy. imo, bs is just a freak. nvm.
     


  15. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I agree, no controversy!

    See how the second quote from the Rake, tallies with the information here, while the first one missed some 70 years, between Tuczek (senior) arriving and George Cleverley starting with the son's firm in 1919. (Fair to presume Tuczek (senior) was dead by 1919.)

    Here is a time table for the history of the firm:

    http://www.classicshoesformen.com/s...gue-slipper-master-nikolaus-tuczek-circa-1950

    Who was the author who wrote the piece for the Rake, did he really have the two (each other contradicting) statements in the same article?
    In this case, it is either sloppy research or sloppy editing.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011


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