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Australian Members

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by earthdragon, Nov 18, 2008.

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  1. tobiasj

    tobiasj Senior member

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    God there is literally nothing you can't do with vinegar.
     
  2. thebrownman

    thebrownman Senior member

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    Is white vinegar also useful for getting the musty smell out of vintage clothing?

    I've got some jackets that want to be worn this winter, but I don't want to stink out the joint..
     
  3. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    Air then and then put them back in closet with fresh lavender that works for me.
     
  4. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Hang them outside in the breeze on hangers on a mild windy day. Not today when it's raining.
    Or in too much direct sun.

    Sometimes the smell is actually in the dust and other matter in the material , so a dry clean is often the best first step.

    If that doesn't get rid of the smell then sprinkle them with bi carb powder and leave for a day then brush off.

    If still there are problems then a bit of the old Nil Oder in discrete places like inside pockets lining, under arms etc can help.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2012
  5. tobiasj

    tobiasj Senior member

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    I must admit fxh, you know stuff :)
     
  6. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    I think someone else has mentioned it. It usually when you take them to cleaners its to get them cleaned.

    Mostly a good brush with clothes brush after each wear for wool, jackets and trousers. But who really does that. So just remember to do it every now and then.

    Hang them out on line on hanger in light breeze for a few hours.

    Hang them on hanger always. Shouldn't need saying but you'd be surprised how many people fold them or something.

    For smallish stains and stuff, don't underestimate the old finger nail. A lot of stuff, like chocolate, sauces, will often just be on the surface and once it drys will scrape off witha bit of discrete fingernail scratching , even in a meeting. Or a nail brush. The old nail brush is useful for lots of things, like suede etc. It's a bit stiffer than a clothes brush, but not as stiff as wire. Similarly an old stiffer type toothbrush should always be on hand.

    Bi carb soda is always useful to have. You can get bulk dry cleaning fluid, called white spirits, **at Bunnings cheap. Surely I needn't point out to use it carefully and after testing.

    The theory is with moths that they only feed on the organic material like food etc in the fabric, not on the fabric itself. So dry cleaning at least once a year is important if you store stuff. All vintage stores drycleaner their stuff at least every year.

    Whilst dry cleaning wool every two weeks or monthly will eventually rob it of life buy sucking out the natural "oils" dry cleaning more than once or twice a year is nothing to get worried about.

    Naturally as a refined gentleman I would have no advice to give about how to get vomit out of clothes.

    ** this is useful for spot cleaning a small spot with a cotton bud .

    Don't underestimate the usefulness of a bit of spit on a clean white hankie.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2012
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  7. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    ^ What I had recommended is to hang the suit in the bathroom and let it steam when your having a shower.

    I was told by a rural woman that putting clothing out over night if you know there is a frost due will get perfidious odours out of garments. Does work tried it with jumpers a few times in the past.
     
  8. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    One theory is that a lot of smells are caused by active bacteria. (I'm guessing inactive bacteria are dead or neutral) . So that the aim is to kill the little buggers. Often the treatment is to place the item, table clothe, curtain, cushion cover, jumper, jacket etc in a waterproof bag inside freezer for 24 hours or so.

    Freezing works for chewing gum and wax amongst other things. Can work for chocolate and some fats.
     
  9. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Even more accurately:: I know a lot more than I let on.
     
  10. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    I know from my Masters placement that museums in Australia when given garments and other fabric items freeze them for 48 hours to kill off any potential threat, bacteria, bugs before accessing them to a collection.

    With gum the best way I found was to get an ice cube or pack and hold it on the offending site and then wait for it to go brittle and scrap it off.
     
  11. Manuhiri

    Manuhiri Well-Known Member

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    I've often been searching the house for my jeans before remembering they are in the freezer. Pretty chilly putting them straight on.
     
  12. Naka

    Naka Senior member

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    I have read an article from a dry cleaner on the Forvm that stated to never hang higher-end suits in the shower to remove creasing and whatnot, as it nullifies the ironwork done to a garment during it's construction, and has the potential to burst seams.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2012
  13. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    I see J Crew are still treating us like idiots. Just picked a random pair of pants.

    US site - Bowery oxford cloth in classic fit $88.00
    Aust site - Bowery oxford cloth in classic fit AUD 128.70


    Was prompted to compare after watching this:

     
  14. blahman

    blahman Senior member

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    ^^ It will be worth it once our dollar slides back down to about US$0.75 to the Aussie dollar :laugh:
     
  15. sirgodard

    sirgodard New Member

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    Long time lurker here so I thought I will finally contribute something. Since there's no flush toe caps in Melbourne (and I find the raised ones very uncomfortable) I asked my local North Melbourne cobbler to install a Topy on the tip on the sole only (I didn't want the full Topy because the sole of these particular shoes is already quite thick). So here's what I call flush Topy toe cap.


    [​IMG].
     
  16. quar

    quar Senior member

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    Must be some questionable seams on your coats if they are at risk of bursting from sitting in a humid room.
     
  17. Naka

    Naka Senior member

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    I'm sure that a burst seam would be an extreme case, but I have seen it happen before as a result of both poor dry cleaning and home steaming.
     
  18. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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  19. Plestor

    Plestor Senior member

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    Last edited: May 25, 2012
  20. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Nothing beats getting touched up in your suit
     
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