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Australian Members

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by earthdragon, Nov 18, 2008.

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  1. ColdEyedPugilist

    ColdEyedPugilist Senior member

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    QFT

    That phrase is starting to piss me off but good.
     
  2. tailoredstuff

    tailoredstuff Well-Known Member

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  3. Axel Ferguson

    Axel Ferguson Senior member

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    Yeah SF approved is such en empty concept. The audience of this forum ranges from fashionistas to people who want to party like it's 1929 to people who will slouch to work and then play dress up to impress the boss. It's as inconsistent as it gets. It's mainly a lot of brands getting touted.
     
  4. tone76

    tone76 Senior member

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    I think the SF Approved[​IMG] tag can be useful for those starting out on their sartorial journey, particularly when it comes to certain brands to look out for. That said, I don't care for some stylistic elements that are SF Approved[​IMG], and I actually quite enjoy other stylistic elements that would get me escorted from any of the WAYWRN threads in disgrace.

    I have a number of non-SF Approved[​IMG] garments in my wardrobe, mainly by virtue of the fact that the brands aren't well known in the US. However, they fit well and look good, so I'll cope. Most people wouldn't know the difference anyway.

    Perhaps we need an SF Approved[​IMG] Australian Edition, as a buyer's guide? It's a given that P Johnson, MJ Bale, Herringbone and R&B would be on that list.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  5. meister

    meister Senior member

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  6. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    I thought the only thing that was Style Forum approved was trying to dress with a bit of style.
     
  7. tobiasj

    tobiasj Senior member

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    I agree.

    I've bought Loake and Herring shoes, Howard Yount trousers, Sam Hober ties, Modern Tailor shirts, Gold Toe socks, a Fulton umbrella, R&B and Kent Wang pocket squares... All of these brands are 'SF approved' to some degree at least -- by which I mean, they are talked about on here, suggested to new members and attract generally positive reviews -- and with the exception of Loake, I would never have heard of any of them were it not for SF. I'm very happy with pretty much all of my purchases, so as far as 'SF approved' means 'brand/thing to look out for', I'm all for it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  8. Henry Carter

    Henry Carter Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    The SF tag can almost be split in to 2 different meanings I think, firstly the SF Approved Brands as Tobias mentions above which I've bought from many of them also and are happy for the most part with my purchases.

    Then there is the uglier side of SF approved in where members try to dictate whats approved to wear or how to wear them. Take for example a few of the more annoying commentators on WAYWRN that incessantly try and critique outfits (while never posting there own) with the same critiques everytime with the likes of "add a white pocket square and change the knot to a double four in hand and this would be great" bollocks. How have they come to these conclusions anyway other than simply being on SF? Things like DFIH knots scarcely exist in the outside SF world and that's where it becomes a bit of a wank, but I think the whole SF approved concept as far as my latter definition goes has had a bit of a backlash of late in anycase, which is only a good thing. I think in most cases when posters try and dress SF approved and dont know what they are doing they mainly end up just looking like young blokes dressed like old blokes, having forgotten about whether they actually look good or not.
     
  9. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Well put.

    Maybe the only phrase used should be 'Style Forum approved supplier', as in they sell decent stuff at an appropriate price and are reliable in terms of quality and delivery.
     
  10. bhall41

    bhall41 Senior member

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    Hoping that TM sign is meant tongue in cheek, god knows there is enough bollocks posted on this forum already. Tone, in response to your question, the answer is no :)
     
  11. ColdEyedPugilist

    ColdEyedPugilist Senior member

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    Couldn't have said it better myself.

    Through SF, I was introduced to artisans such as Charle Nahkle, Sam Hober and Patrick Johnson. If not for SF, I might not know of the Armoury or Vanda Fine Clothing. As a clearinghouse for information related to style, SF is quite unmatched.

    What I dislike is said smart-arse posters who almost slavishly adhere to SF groupthink.

    Back in 07, there were regular posts by Sator, Manton, Iammatt, Vox, Will and others. They made for enjoyable, informative reading. These days, I tend to avoid WAYWN altogether.

    Such is life.
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. lennier

    lennier Senior member

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    Think you've hit the nail pretty squarely on the head here Jason. All the "short cuffed suit pants with sockless brogues is SF approved but having a cuff button undone is not" type of rubbish is a whole world away from the extremely valuable collective knowledge of forum members about the quality or otherwise of particular 'SF approved' products or services. Note that I am not condemning nor endorsing either of the above stylistic choices :)
     
  13. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    Your right about this more so when one has to order from OS due to the scarcity of decent RTW apparel available here. It took five days by Fed Ex to deliver from BB to ACT which is good, mind you it costs enough but with the boxing day sale prices still a bargain.

    As for SF approved styles, well i subscribe to the fact that taste and style are elements of men's dress and deportment which require development over time, and once you find what works for you, you tend to stick with it. ( that is if it stays in fashion; sigh)
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012
  14. Henry Carter

    Henry Carter Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    Wouldn't it be good if this whole forum was as rational as this one thread.
     
  15. __PG__

    __PG__ Senior member

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    I think SF approved can be summed as 'Don't buy crap'. Something either has intrinsic value or quality, or it doesn't.

    That's what I've taken away from SF. People's personal choices and opinions regarding style and flair are just opinions and open to interpretation. But objectively, something is either well constructed or it isn't. And no amount of advertising or an artificially-inflated pricetag to create artificial scarcity and perceptions of consumer exclusivity can change that.
     
  16. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Tinkering with a spy's tailoring - January 19, 2012
    http://www.theage.com.au/world/tinkerin … 1q6ev.html

    The devil is in the detail -and the suit - when designing costumes for spies. By Philippa Hawker.

    MEN in suits. That's what the brief was, for costume designer Jacqueline Durran when she signed on to Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, the film adaptation of John le Carre's celebrated novel of espionage and betrayal. Suits are a far cry from the period flourishes of Pride and Prejudice, for which she was nominated for a BAFTA and an Oscar, and there's no chance to design anything like the emerald green dress that Keira Knightley wore in Atonement, another of Durran's projects.

    Yet it was the constraint, she says, that made it interesting - because of the narrow spectrum, the differentiating detail became vital.
    Durran came to her career indirectly. She studied philosophy at university before realising, in her mid-twenties, that she wanted to be a costume designer for film. She knew no one who worked in the area but eventually got a start assisting costume designer Lindy Hemming, who worked for English director Mike Leigh. And a few years later, when Hemming couldn't do Leigh's 2002 film All Or Nothing, she recommended Durran for the job.

    You could be forgiven for thinking that Leigh, with his stark, often downbeat and dour embrace of realism, would not spend much time thinking about costumes. But you would be wrong. Leigh, says Durran, is "very interested in the idea that the way someone looks reveals the character". What's more, Leigh's painstaking, often improvisatory methods of preparation enhance this further.

    "Because the actors work on their characters for a long time, and it's such a precise portrayal, the costumes can be extremely precise as well."

    She has had the experience, she notes, of being an assistant on films in which the directors are not particularly interested in what their characters are wearing, and it's a miserable task.

    The costume designer's job, as far as she is concerned, is completely focused on giving the director what he or she wants. And if they don't really care, there is almost nowhere for you to go.

    The director of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Swedish filmmaker Tomas Alfredson (Let The Right One In) is an example of someone who cares, she hastens to add.

    For the central character of George Smiley, a former agent who comes out of retirement to hunt down a highly placed mole inside British intelligence, Alfredson gave her a specific brief.

    He handed her some photographs of author (and sometime spy) Graham Greene "that he felt were very Smiley. That was how he imagined him. And it mainly had to do with his reversible mac.'' She went to the traditional firm Aquascutum, who remade one of their archive styles for the production.
    Smiley is played by Gary Oldman in a performance of wonderfully recessive intensity and restraint. Oldman worked with Leigh, very early in his career, in Meantime (1985), and Durran says it's quite likely that this influenced Oldman's approach to what he wears as an actor.

    "Gary is interested from the character point of view in the thing being right, not in style for style's sake." It was Oldman who tracked down an accessory they spent a long time searching for - a key element of his character's self-presentation - his spectacles.

    The figures of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy are almost all men of a certain class and age. The film is set in the 1970s, but the principal characters were not slaves to fashion: they were the sort of people, Durran says, who wore the same suits for many years. To create their wardrobe, she went to a Savile Row tailor who made costumes based on original sample suits from the 1950s.

    Her task was about limitations, she says. "You're not making bold statements or great dresses or anything eye-catching." But small things are being conveyed, all the same. That Toby Esterhase (David Dencik) wears a bow tie with his suits, she says, tells you he is not English. And that Bill Haydon (Colin Firth) wears red socks is an equally clear signifier. "It's an upper-middle-class English thing, the red or yellow sock."

    But one of her greatest challenges was getting bespoke suits made, with duplicates, by Savile Row tailors working not to their own timetables, but to the imperatives of the film industry. In fact, she says, "it was a nightmare trying to get them to do in three weeks what they will take two months to do''.
     
  17. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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  18. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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  19. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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  20. Alexander Scriabin

    Alexander Scriabin Well-Known Member

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    I don't think that this has already been posted, but American Tailors in Melbourne has a bunch of new Carmina models at $525 and their remaining stock of G&Gs are down to something like $795.

    I also think the C&J Handgrades are something like $595 now too.

    Worth popping in.
     
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