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Australian Members

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by earthdragon, Nov 18, 2008.

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  1. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Anyone worn anything made from bamboo fabric?
     
  2. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    A fair few things. Underwear,pyjamas, a shirt or two. What's the problem?
     
  3. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Not a problem, curiosity is all.

    How does it feel and wear?

    Or should I be saying what's the hand and drape like?
     
  4. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Complicated question. Iirc There's bamboo fibre long and crushed pulped converted fibre . the latter can be/is called viscose. Viscose can also be wood pulp. These, and a few others, are called natural plant based manufactured materials.

    I'm not sure of the labeling laws, they are difficult to interpret at times, and it can depend what has precedence, country of origin of material, country of manufacture of garment or country of sale. But you know all that.

    Mostly it seems to me that clothing labelled bamboo is, usually, the uncrushed long fibres. It, largely, seems to act and feel and handle like a linen/ cotton mixture. Washes well, softens over time etc. Technically could be said to be as good as cotton and or linen and on some criteria can be said to be slightly superior.

    For average use doesn't seem to offer anything different to cotton or linen or a blend.

    There are possibly some sustainability/ green advantages in supply chain, growing etc.
     
  5. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Cheers.

    You can get everything from undies to sports coats made from it now.
     
  6. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

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    I used to have a bamboo curtain, but it's gone now.
     
  7. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    The horror. The horror.
     
  8. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Its always been around but the hippy/greenie sustainability mob have been smitten by it for some time lately. The anti bacterial properties are often touted. But they are weak/minimal in untreated fibre and destroyed in treated. Paradoxically it often has chemical anti bacterial stuff added later. Its not easy being green!

    People rarely realise that viscose is renewable and plant based and can be called natural.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2014
  9. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    Not too bad, although I've heard some concerns about longevity. Techniques may have improved, but I saw some examples made by Italian companies that were early adopters of bamboo-blend fabrics that wore out more quickly than expected.

    Just watch out for giant pandas, particularly if you're wearing bamboo undies.
     
  10. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Lots of chemicals involved though.
     
  11. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Lots of chemicals involved in growing wool and cotton and in treating bothboth materials in the manufacturing and finishing processes.
     
  12. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    True, but I thought viscose was basically a chemical compound with some mushed up stuff (from what, I wonder?) then spun into a fibre.
     
  13. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Viscose is mushed up pulp. Probably an oxymoron as mushed up is pulp and pulp is mushed up stuff. What is usually mushed up into pulp is wood fibre. The pulp is treated with chemicals to make a viscose, one type is rayon.

    If you put your hand down into your well made slim flattering trousers, or someone else's trousers, you will feel, amongst other things, the lining around the crotch and down to knee is usually Bemberg - a name for a version of viscose /rayon. If you are in a public area or a sensitive soul you could instead open your exquisitely tailored suit jacket and you will notice that the inner visible lining is Bemberg a form of viscose/rayon. highly prized for its qualities in this role.

    There is confusion because variations of viscose are trademarked/branded so the brand names often also reference a manufacturing variant/method. A bit like Biro etc.

    Rhetoric about chemicals from activist partisans on either side - rapacious capitalist manufacturers vs. whacky hippies etc aside - evaluation of sustainability/ green issues is difficult unless an objective evaluation of the whole supply chain, including from growing to ease of recycling/reuse, is undertaken and comparisons made. I don't have a strong view at the moment but it clearly isn't a simple issue.
     
  14. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    I'm well familiar with fondling Bemberg.

    Usually with few complaints.
     
  15. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

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    Cupro is another name for a type of Bemberg/rayon. Have also heard it referred to as Modal though funnily enough only in women's clothes. As fxh says a lot of these are trademarked names from companies like DuPont etc. that invented them.

    They are all variations on a theme and differ generally only in the type of plant/byproduct that is used in the pulp.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2014
  16. Foxhound

    Foxhound Senior member

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    Terrible photo, but today's layer game.
    [​IMG]

    Barbour - Luxire - Kamakura
     
  17. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Modal is used by some brands in men's undies.
     
  18. Liber

    Liber Senior member

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    Y U NO POP THIRD COLLAR?
     
  19. Petepan

    Petepan Senior member

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    How I envy you. I'll just listen again to Cole Porter's I Love Paris...

    Nothing bought yet? Why not take the RER A out to La Vallee factory outlets? From memory, Hackett stuff is pretty good value. Try on some shoes from Markowski, Septieme Largeur and for some laughs, even Aubercy. RTW Suits from exclusive Paris houses as recommended by Parisian Gentleman. Have a browse at Lander Urquijo in St Germain, unique Spanish menswear.

    If you are into fragrances, there are stuff that you could only buy in Paris, such as Dior Jules, L'Artisan Safran Troublant, Atelier Cologne Sous Le Toit de Paris, and Maison Francis Kurkdjian 754 EDP.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2014
  20. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    +1 on PeterPan's suggestions.

    In regard to affordable shoes (as opposed to Corthay, Aubercy and Lobb Paris, for example), in addition to Septieme Largeur, the Carmina store in Paris is well worth a look. It's at 4 Avenue de l'Opera.

    Also, just for the sake of history, have a look in the Charvet store at 28 Place Vendome. It's a wonderful store and really a must-visit location for anyone keen on menswear.
     
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