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Australian Members

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by earthdragon, Nov 18, 2008.

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  1. sliq

    sliq Senior member

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    yes; also if you wear a neck tie.
     
  2. Plestor

    Plestor Senior member

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    I like mine. The control makes it somewhat more forgiving than most filter based methods. I tend to the faffing around end of coffee making however as have pretty exacting brew temperatures / weights / times /grind routines. This isn't really needed however and I can make very good cups without timing / measuring anything. Its certainly easier than any manual cone based variants I've tried (CCD / V60 / chemex).

    One thing that should be mention here is that I prefer metallic over paper filters in all of the above. Both the (new) kaffeologie and able are good here and my favourite depends on the bean. My current brew method is 18-20g (roast dependant) into an inverted, preheated tube pour 50ml 85* water for 30s then preinfuse for 30s. Add 150ml over another 30s and brew for 1 min 15s. Flip and extract over 30s till the hiss starts, discarding the remainder.

    I take out the old bodum FP when making filter variants for lots of people, although in most cases they tend to want me to the on the portofino.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. JimmyHoffa

    JimmyHoffa Senior member

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    Same answer if you wear a navy suit?

    Black tie = black suit, white shirt and black bow tie only?
     
  4. Henry Carter

    Henry Carter Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    ^More or less. Midnight navy tux is good too, but probably rarer than black tuxes.
     
  5. Stiva

    Stiva Senior member

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    Ivory/white/cream jacket in the tropics or resorts or in high summer is also OK. Plain black suits are a bit dodgy - depending on the occasion - because they don't have the satin or grosgrain facing and trouser stripe details a dinner suit has. I've seen velvet smoking jackets look OK on the very young and the very old. Black patent leather shoes are preferable. Never liked the opera pumps. Black bow tie only. Unless you are going to the Oscars or the ARIAs, in which case all bets are off. But all this might be considered a bit anachronistic now, because I've been to a lot of black tie dos where only about 20% of the blokes are wearing anything approaching black tie. When we had black tie dos at Sydney Uni - in the mid-80s I'm talking about - we just went to the op shop and got whatever they had and however it fitted and whatever the era. When I go to black tie dos now, my favourites are the old blokes wearing the most moth eaten, stained, beat up dinner suits you could imagine. Testament to many big nights guzzling port and falling in the hedge afterwards while waiting for taxis or staggering to the nearest pub. That is true sprezz.
     
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  6. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Technically a Black Tie invite should mean not just any old black suit and any old black tie but a Dinner Suit, or what our american friends call a Tux, short for Tuxedo or Tuxedo Suit, and a black bow tie. No ifs and no buts.

    But I must say the small number of black tie events I've been to in the last 5 years or so I've never seen more than 20% of men in a dinner suit. They were all small events of less than 100 persons and actual dinners.

    In that time of also been to two cocktail hour (s) functions at government house where the invite said lounge suit although according to some "rules" a dinner suit would be appropriate. No one wore a dinner suit and a few didn't even wear ties.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  7. Petepan

    Petepan Senior member

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    Congratulations, time to buy more shoes to go with your socks.:D
     
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  8. Stiva

    Stiva Senior member

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  9. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Heh stiva, just saw your post. Great stats. Consensus.
     
  10. Stiva

    Stiva Senior member

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    Statistical AND stylistic correlation. We must be right.
     
  11. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Yes.
    One thing. I can remember when you could walk into an opshop and pick up a hardly worn, nice dinner suit for $10 from a rack of 30 or so. No more. Rarely see one in an opshop these days.
    Code:
    
    
     
  12. ajc2162

    ajc2162 Senior member

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  13. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Stiva, I also reckon a velvet smoking jacket, in dark blue, black or deep burgundy can look good for the right person. Crushed velvet even better. Must have bow tie. Looks suitably nighttime and if you made an effort. Certainly not office/business wear. Can look a bit rock n roll. The velvet jacket can work well in other night time outings.
     
  14. andrewjamesdean

    andrewjamesdean Senior member

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    Does anyone here have an Otto / The Little Guy? I'm interested in picking one up...
     
  15. Coxsackie

    Coxsackie Senior member

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    I was always under the impression that "evening dress" on an invitation meant either white or black tie. If one wished one's guests to wear a normal suit, one would write "lounge suit".

    I was invited to an "evening dress" function in Shanghai a few years back. It was for the launch of the (now defunct) Gerald Genta watch brand in China. CEO Gérald Roden was there, as well as Thomas Mao from the PuristsPro website and various other international watch industry luminaries. You'd think that if they specified evening dress, it meant evening dress.

    So I turned up in a dinner jacket with black tie. (Ok, some details were wrong - no patents, wing-collar shirt, and a pre-tied bow tie). Of course, I was the only one. A few guests had bothered to don business suits. There was a smattering of sports jackets. Several people wore jeans, and one or two were even sporting shorts and T-shirts.

    Ridiculous. I felt out of place at an "evening dress" function because I was in a tux. Oh, for shame.
     
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  16. cappedncollared

    cappedncollared Well-Known Member

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    I had an extended loan of one. They are certainly capable of good coffee, but it felt like a lot of work getting everything heated up and then dialling in shots.

    I've had the luck of being able to try a lot of home coffee solutions and always find myself coming back to the commandante hand grinder, alternating between the hario v60 and kalita wave. Cheap, clean, simple and a both capable of a great cup.
     
  17. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Thanks all for the coffee info so far . Faffing about excused - after all I do have a vacuum glass tower thingo. Ms. wants a HARIO type drip thing. I pretty much only use my little italian man Bialleti ? Stovetop these days.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014
  18. Stiva

    Stiva Senior member

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    fhx, I have also seen a few very dark green velvet jackets look good in the formal context. They can look either very trad or, as you say, very rock n roll, depending on how they're worn. Never done it myself, and probably never will (except perhaps in eccentric retirement), but I appreciate it when I see it done well.

    Cox, as you clearly know "evening dress" means black tie (if you accept that white tie is all but dead now) - no ifs or buts. You should never feel out of place if that's the code advised and you dress accordingly. As my wife says, "A well tailored suit is to women what lingerie is to men, and no man looks better than when in black tie".
     
  19. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    I must add that a few mates of mine who are in large national/international corporates tell me that the companies have one or two semi compulsary black tie events each year, for awards, corporate rah, rah, bullshit etc. There almost everyone wears a dinner suit. The funny thing is most of the schlebbs wear at best one or two scruffy old badly fitting blackish suits all year in between equally scruffy kathmandu fleeces and athletic shoes. I'm told its marvellous what a rented penguin suit can do for some blokes. Equally stunning is how bad some blokes can manage to make a dinner suit look.
     
  20. Plestor

    Plestor Senior member

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    The Otto is a stovetop and makes coffee that has more in common with that than normal espresso, I've had a shot from one but otherwise haven't used one for long enough to comment more other than warning that the grind requirements make it questionable for travel. Unless you really want stovetop there are other things I'd get in that price range depending on your exact requirements.
     
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