1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Australian Members

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by earthdragon, Nov 18, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

    Messages:
    5,540
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    
    Nice. I am pretty set for boots though. I have two pairs of tan chukkas, some RMWs and a pair of Grenson ankle boots similar to those in style. So I'm pretty right there. I am looking more for dress shoes for work.
     
  2. Petepan

    Petepan Senior member

    Messages:
    1,525
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2012
    Nice bottle though:



    But this still triumphs:
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2014
  3. Romp

    Romp Senior member

    Messages:
    1,808
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney? Melbourne?
    Want these Edward greens but unsure on model

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Romp, they look great.

    I have never seen EG make a punch captoe chukka boot before, so are you absolutely sure that they are EG?

    I'd suspect that the easiest way to identify them might be to either e-mail EG directly (and I've received prompt responses, within a day, on the couple of occasions that I've e-mailed them), or to ask a knowledgeable reseller - perhaps the brothers at Double Monk might know.

    Alternatively, you could post the pic in the Edward Green thread here, and see if one of the knowledgeable people there, including affiliate vendors, recognises them.

    If they are an MTO or a special run from a few years back, then you might be out of luck as I've heard that EG are much less flexible with MTO shoes and boots now than they used to be, unfortunately.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  5. jmills

    jmills Senior member

    Messages:
    398
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2012
    Location:
    Australia
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  6. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    And now, some depressing news for anyone studying law at present, or anyone thinking of studying law.

    An article from today's AFR reinforces what most of us already realised - that there is a massive glut of new law grads, at a time when the legal market is contracting:

    http://www.afr.com/p/national/law_degree_the_new_arts_degree_students_1K7jPfP5dRkaZGVazcMAEP

    There are about 60 000 legal practitioners in the Australian legal marketplace, but 12 000 people graduate from either undergrad or postgrad degrees each year. Each year! Clearly, not many of those lawyers retire each year and the legal market is, at most, stable and, at worst, shrinking and yet the market is being flooded by people with expensive law degrees.

    What frustrates me is that now it seems that law is being marketed as a "generalist" degree - this is certainly not the first time I've read this kind of statement:

    The president of the Law Institute of Victoria, Geoff Bowyer, said law degrees should now be considered a good generalist qualification.

    “The law degree is changing from being a career-specific [degree] to a broad degree,” he said. “Law degrees are seen in corporate and government as a good base for making good administrative people. Arts used to be seen as that generalist field. In a soc­iety where regulation is increasing, being able to [understand it] is a skill.”


    I understand his point, but to say that law is a generalist degree is, in my humble opinion, a load of bollocks.

    Yes, a law degree should, ideally, teach you how to research, how to think analytically, and how to write logically and so it does give you skills that you can apply in a general sense to a wide variety of jobs.

    However, people with a decent Arts degree or a decent Psych degree or a variety of other degrees can also do research, can also think analytically, can also write logically – and they'll also be applying for those generic, or government grad jobs.

    I don't think that a law degree is a hindrance in such circumstances, but I don't think that it's really a help, either (as in, although it's a degree, it's not as though an employer outside the legal field will look at you and think, "Oooh, he's got a law degree, I'd better employ him because he's a good analytical thinker.").

    The unfortunate thing about the "law is a good generalist degree" is that it is wrong. A law degree is a professional degree – it's designed to enable graduates to practice in the profession of law. We don't talk about other professional degrees as "good generalist degrees". After all, I wouldn't study accountancy if I didn't aim to become an accountant. I wouldn't think, "Oh, well, at least if I don't become an accountant I'll be good with numbers!"
     
  7. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

    Messages:
    5,540
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    

    Not to worry JM; Tones is on the case. By the time he's finished with all the Royal Commissions, Inquiries and court cases into anybody who even thought about voting against him at any point since 2007, available lawyers will ba as scarce as strippers at the parish picnic.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  8. Oli2012

    Oli2012 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,267
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    There are two issues:

    (1) the glut of Gen-Ys whose parents told them they would be golden children who would go onto study medicine or law (because, you know, those two are totally related)
    (2) the universities who use the high fees and low costs of law faculties to subsidise their other departments

    The golden days are over.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  9. PapaRubbery

    PapaRubbery Senior member

    Messages:
    783
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    http://www.waitbutwhy.com/2013/09/why-generation-y-yuppies-are-unhappy.html

    Great great article.

    JM - my fiancee is a final year JD student. Half her course are getting JD's (paid for by their employer) as a CV boosting exercise to help them reach management positions (because lord knows what makes a good boss is another Uni degree, not any form of competence!), and the other half actually *want* to practice law.

    Also getting a LLB/JD from a second rate Uni with a law department which didn't exist five years ago is hardly going to make you competitive against a graduate from a globally-recognised Uni. So that explains a lot of graduates who would struggle to enter the practicing profession.
     
  10. Osiris2012

    Osiris2012 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,747
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane
    My opinion on these topics is often unpopular but I think a law degree, an accounting degree and most degrees - by themselves - are indeed generalist degrees. It is the post degree regiment that really lends itself to the professional by way of elements of supervised employment, study and time before one is considered a practitioner in that field.

    An accounting degree by itself barely qualifies you to handle an individual tax return through e-tax in the same manner that a medical degree or psychology degree does not quality you to start treating people.

    It is not until one has completed the post degree elements that one would become a recognised professional in the field and truthfully that's how you should want it because if a degree alone is the standard of a professional then you are lowering the bar for your own profession.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  11. Petepan

    Petepan Senior member

    Messages:
    1,525
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2012
    

    Not sure that i agree with this. Getting a law degree does not qualify me to do the post degree elements to become a doctor or a psychologist, and same applies vice versa. Perhaps you are referring to actual practical experience rather than the specific pathways of particular professions. A real generalist degree would be something like say Arts or Business Admin.
     
  12. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Osiris, you do make a good point.

    However, I still think that a law degree is certainly not a generalist degree in the same way that an Arts degree is. After all, if you're interested in fields like history, literature, philosophy, religion of a multitude of other fields, you will find something to interest you in an Arts degree. An Arts degree typically does not prepare you for a particular career, which is both a strength and (nowadays) a weakness.

    However, in a law degree you study law. That's it. Of course, you are able to do some other subjects as part of your degree but for something like 85% of the time, you study law. Once you've finished your four-year degree and done a six-month legal training course to gain admission as a solicitor, that's it - you are a lawyer.
     
  13. herringbonePete

    herringbonePete Senior member

    Messages:
    221
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Location:
    Australia
    Will almost certainly get to the next Wear Event having paid and failed to get to the Christmas event.

    Saw some familiar faces from the Spring event in the Bond photos.

    PS, for winter, I also want to get a padded jacket - just missed out on a Barbour Endurance on the Bay.
     
  14. Foxhound

    Foxhound Senior member

    Messages:
    2,748
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Just finished a 16 hour shift. Been working the last few days for the florist down the road. I'm so happy that a lot of the 86 posts I had to come back to read where small puns. Some were even mildly entertaining. Getting up at 6 to pull apart the kitchen with old man so we can start tiling and install the new kitchen. The joys of life.

    I'm surprised there haven't been any posts concerning Valentines Day. I hope you all had a much better one than me.

    Working in a florist has given me a real appreciation for the day, and I now sincerely think that it recieves far to much critism. Marketing scam or not, I delivered dozens of different flower orders. I saw an uncountable amount of faces light up with smiles as I delivered their flowers. Many men also chose to send flowers to not only their significant other, but also their daughters, often quite young, which was really sweet. I walked past many resturants jam packed with people laughing and smiling, all enjoying themselves. It's a day that makes a lot of people very happy, I think it's a fantastic thing, and recieves far too much critism. It also brings very little harm with it.


    As for the PJ discussion, I just would like someone to answer my very simple question, yes or no. It's really quite funny, people seem to go to extensive lenghts to avoid asnwering it. Is Patrick a tailor? If I was to provide him with the cloth, could he sit down and make me a jacket himself, perfectly fitted?

    Thanks to Oli as well for sending me a copy of Fuck Yeah Menswear to read. I'm a little disappointed that there aren't more words and too many pictures. Going to read ZAMM afterwards.

    It appears as though 2014 will be the year of the waiting period as well. Waiting for three TOJ's. Waiting for Luxire Mac. Will soon be waiting for RMW's and probably another Oscar Hunt jacket. Not sure what I'll do when I have nothing to wait for though.
     
  15. AndrewRogers

    AndrewRogers Senior member

    Messages:
    1,617
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Location:
    crutches
    

    These look like a Banbury with a punched toe cap. Edward Green do quite a bit of customisation on their MTO and Top Drawer shoes. I had a pair of boots made and they were willing to change some stitching for me, which meant a change in how the leather needed to be clicked. I am sure they can do this for you, as they might have for Taka.

    Best,
    Andrew
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. Pink Socks

    Pink Socks Senior member

    Messages:
    1,708
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Foxy

    Agree with your sentiments about Valentine's Day. My wife and I never really do too much for it but always take a moment to reflect on our wonderful relationship. This year I bought her favourite flowers and organised cheese, Tasmanian sparkling and dinner. She has had a long and tough week and was very happy with it all.

    I cannot be 100% sure but suspect the answer to your PJ question is no. But think the question is looking at things the wrong way. Does an architect need to be able to build your house? Or a chef rear the cattle?

    Look at it with the same joy for life and optimism you look at Valentine's Day. If it makes people happy that is really all that matters.

    At the end of the day is that not the whole point of it all.

    Pink Socks presents - "the Big Picture".

    OK too much rambling, time for bed...though the mattress is a bit lumpy with all that cash stuffed under it (eh PapaRubbery?...).
     
  17. Gerry Nelson

    Gerry Nelson Senior member

    Messages:
    5,615
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2011
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    That's nice, PS. We don't do very much as well. Yesterday, we bought some Japanese food and ate dinner down by the bay while one seagull acted as a security guard and kept every other bird away - it was brilliant!

    On another note, House Of Cards has started for Season 2!
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  18. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

    Messages:
    4,432
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2009
    Location:
    Sydney
    
    The top unis here only offer law as either a combined degree or a postgraduate degree. So you pretty much have to do a generalist degree as part of your legal education.

    Also, it's obvious all the 12,000 or so law graduates do not look for work in the legal profession, and may never work as lawyers. Some see law as a "fall back" qualification, so if they get made redundant at their bank they can always set up as a practicing solicitor (yeah right). Others feel an understanding of the law will be beneficial to their non-legal careers (law faculties have of course been guilty of perpetrating this view); I tend to agree.

    Anyway, if I were a practising lawyer I wouldn't be too worried about the raw number of annual law grads as many of them will probably never actually work in the legal profession, at least not for much of their careers.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. Coxsackie

    Coxsackie Senior member

    Messages:
    3,964
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2013
    Location:
    Melbourne - Sydney - Shanghai
    This idea of law being (or becoming) a generalist degree is actually not so new. My father studied business law in Prague between the wars. Yes, there was a degree in business law. He never intended to become a lawyer, and after the dust of WWII settled he embarked upon a business career in Vienna before emigrating to Australia.

    Turning to Valentine's Day, my wife is back in Shanghai so instead a few friends and I went to dinner at Garfish in Crow's Nest. Now, the Lower North Shore is strictly a haven for monied boomers, and Garfish rarely sees anyone under fifty hobble through their portal. But last night there were several young and handsome couples in attendance. For some odd reason, all of them were Caucasian males with Asian females. A couple of the girls were jaw-droppingly hot, too.

    I suppose the oldies always have enough money to dine out (or if they don't, they can arrange a reverse mortgage on their five-million-dollar semi in Cammeray). Whereas the youngsters have to save up for a special occasion. Or?
     
  20. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    

    I do agree that law schools are guilty of perpetuating the "law as generalist degree" or "law as useful knowledge" view. I've even heard some deans espousing those views, whilst admitting that there are far, far too many law graduates nowadays.



    Oh, exactly. If you're already in the profession, you're set (in general, although even big firms have been downsizing in recent years). If you're trying to get into the profession, however, you're in a lot of trouble.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by